18 speed Shimano Mountain bike repair

Discussion in 'Survival Gear' started by anykey, Mar 30, 2013.

  1. anykey

    anykey Suspended

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    I called a shop to see about getting my bike fixed and they do not do bearings at all. They also wont do anything to bikes bought at a department store.

    The rear wheel is wobbly- the sproket/bearing is damaged or missing. I used it for a while somewhat wobbly but now the tires is hitting the frame and chain. So I can not use it as I would wreck the chain and incur more needed repairs.

    The guy who cuts my lawn said he would fix it- "when the weather gets nice". Well it is 54 degrees and sunny here- he must be busy with his girlfriend.

    Looking on ebay parts are very expensive for this bike. I had bought it at a moving sale and thought it had been an expensive bike. So I do not know if it is considered bought from a department store.

    I am not the least bit mechanically inclined.

    I feel stranded- even tho I have a car- I do pretty much via bike.

    Even if a facebook friend gives or sells me one of her kids bikes- I still would want this bike fixed at some point.

    It says california design, magna, Shimano equipte grip shift- 18 speed.

    The rear brake could also be made in better working order.

    Bikes have a lot of use- and if it comes to gas rationing- good mode to get some things done.
  2. neophyte

    neophyte Wonderment :) Forum Contributor

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    Bearings

    anykey: Sir, bearings are bearings. :) on one (or both) sides are numbers. Either take the bearing to any bearing supplier. They can match, and get you going.
    Don't save a penny, replace both sides at the same time.
    It is possible to have different size bearing for each side. These are sealed bearings.

    Bearings are at this level relative cheap.

    Look here. Then you tube Shimano service

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Rebuild-a-bicycle-rear-hub/
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2013
  3. anykey

    anykey Suspended

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    Thank you so much Craig.
  4. Kad Skirata

    Kad Skirata G&G Evangelist

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    The reason most bike shops won't touch wally world/sears/target bikes is quite honestly because they are are waste of material.

    A decent set of wheels/hub tend to cost more than the most expensive bikes from discount stores. The components are easily broken, and not generally available as a replacement because they are not sold separately. The target market for discount store bikes are people who will rarely ride, and or possibly never ride. Or for kids who are just going to beat the tar out of their bikes, leave them unlocked, or "trade" them to their friends for something else.

    There is no demand nor profit for a bike shop (especially independently owned shops) in servicing an inferior product that is at best intended to get a seasons worth of riding. It is possible to repair these bikes on your own if you have a small bit of mechanical aptitude and can find parts. (And not spend more than the bike is worth in the process)

    I am a firm believer in fixing old things that will still work with minimal-moderate expense, and hassle. But you are better off looking for an older "brand name" bike on craigslist, or a low end new version for little more than a department store bike. They have the added advantage of being able to rebuild worn components, and options to upgrade the stock components as needed or desired. You can pick up old Schwinns that were still made in Chicago for around $100 (I sold one that was a project bike with minimal financial investment on my part for $75 that was good to go last year) and upgrade it to a decent ride with "modern" components fairly inexpensively.

    The only problem is those who are not minimally mechanically inclined labor fees at a bike shop can get spendy unless you know the guys, or can sweet talk a deal out of the shop owner/manager.
  5. Huey Rider

    Huey Rider G&G Evangelist

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    You can get a new mountain bike at the big box stores for around 70-80 bucks. So if it's gonna cost you near or over that amount I'd consider biting the bullet and buying a new one. Possibly parting the old one out on Craigs List to help offset the cost.
  6. anykey

    anykey Suspended

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    We have a store that sells- things like a pawn shop does- they had 2 bikes last year- one was $125, one was $100. How do I tell if it is worth the cost?

    My bike does not just sit in the garage- I use it a few times a week- year round. I haul groceries and recycling on it. I do errands- go thru terrain and paved surfaces.
  7. anykey

    anykey Suspended

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    from a friend who had seen it

    Its the bearing opposite the sprockets. The sprockets are fine. Bearings are generic. I usually ask for them at places that rebuild electric motors
  8. neophyte

    neophyte Wonderment :) Forum Contributor

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    Good Idea

    anykey: Sir, proper idea, proper attitude. Personally, I'd replace both sides, removing all doubts. (Basic service)
  9. anykey

    anykey Suspended

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  10. anykey

    anykey Suspended

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    The bearing

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  11. neophyte

    neophyte Wonderment :) Forum Contributor

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  12. Kad Skirata

    Kad Skirata G&G Evangelist

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    I ride year round too. 95% of the time or better I bike, or walk to the super market, and any immediate needs. This past winter however I rode as little as possible because I prefer to walk. I also sold my '98 Marin East Peak full suspension and studded tires I used as winter transport. My brother needed a bike.

    My roommates each have a pair of bikes specifically set up for winter and are more than happy to let me borrow whichever they didn't ride in for their 10 mile per way commute to work. I just don't like borrowing bikes that are worth between a grand, and $1800 unless it's necessary.

    In the next week or two I will be able to ride my summer bikes as long as it doesn't snow again. I like to wait until the snow has finished melting, and some of the gravel/salt gets washed off the tarmac. Thankfully this will be my last Minnesota winter. I was hoping to be out of here a year ago, but this year it's going to happen unless something dramatic happens to change those plans.
  13. Kad Skirata

    Kad Skirata G&G Evangelist

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    From the look of the pictures your hub is shot, which means at the least you need the wheel set replaced. It will cost more to replace the hub, spokes, and pay for the labor.

    You may be able to find a suitable set at a used bike shop, or craigslist for a decent price, but you will still have to pay labor to pull the gear cassette off the hub, and place it on the new one. It's cheaper than paying for a whole new bike if you find a good deal on the wheels though. Riding over the winter you should plan on replacing components more often than summer only bikes. A winters riding will usually kill hubs, bottom brackets, chains, and often gearing, derailleurs, breaks and pedals.

    It's usually best to buy decent, but cheap or clearance marked parts. Many times you can find last years model which is hardly different, if at all for significant discount if you search online shops, or bike shops. It's well worth your time to become at least minimally knowledgeable of the "worth" of one bike over another, and learn basic repair and upkeep. Many local adult learning courses are available for little to no cost at community centers and the like.

    I am terrible at anything mechanic except for taking care of my guns, and small/emergency repairs, and upkeep to my bikes. It's not as overwhelming as you think.
  14. anykey

    anykey Suspended

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    I think the guy who cuts my grass can look at my bike on Sunday. I dont know what stores will be open for parts- I wonder if Lowes would have it.
  15. anykey

    anykey Suspended

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    Model # 8546-11



    1997 3 20

    97TD113641
  16. anykey

    anykey Suspended

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    The guy looked at it- how much should a used wheel cost? Guesstimate?

    He said it needs a wheel. He is having a buddy of his locate one.





  17. OneHitWonder

    OneHitWonder G&G Newbie

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    Had hubs like that a long time ago. The bearing cups would come loose periodically. The black caps that thread in to hold the bearings inside and keep the dirt out are the bearing retaining cups. Take the wheel off and try to srcew the bearing retaining cup tight. Needed to do this several times a season.

    Of course this wheel could have been riden while loose and messed up the whole thing from ever working good again, even with new bearings.


    New rear brake if you can find it.

    IMO scrap it (drop $500 minimum on a new bike) or find a single speed wheel and loose all the extra cables and sprockets you don't need and can't maintain. A wally bike will break under any hard use. Basically grown up sized toys. Overweight , cheap materials , not soundly built often , springs do not equal suspension.

    More IMO. Been around the bike block and spent thousands and had massive suspension for DH racing and Freeride hucking,had short travel 27 speed high zoot XC race bikes, but my most used offroad and road bike is a rigid (no suspension front or rear ) 29" wheel , fat tire, single speed( no gears ) Cable pulled Aid BB7 disc brakes. This bike is light and sturdy and never breaksdown, and that is the most important thing in a survival situation when you don't have time or means to repair junk.
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2013
  18. anykey

    anykey Suspended

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    Hey everyone! Rick was here, he went for dinner and is coming back to repair my bike.

    The bearing was not the problem- the wheel was. Rick has a buddy who collects junk galore- so the part is not costing me anything. I plan to pay him $10. I hope that is enough.

    I am really excited that I soon will have a working bike!!
  19. Huey Rider

    Huey Rider G&G Evangelist

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    Good deal!!
  20. neophyte

    neophyte Wonderment :) Forum Contributor

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    Biker

    anykey: Sir, one mans junk:) another's treasures:). Excellent deal