338 win mag vs. 300 win mag

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Magnumsrule, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. Magnumsrule

    Magnumsrule G&G Newbie

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    Which do you think is a better caliber? Do you think that there is really any noticable difference between the two?
  2. ParkerHale308

    ParkerHale308 G&G Newbie

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    long range would be the difference, the 300 will perform better on longer shots
  3. SilverRun

    SilverRun G&G Newbie

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    Recoil will be the biggest difference - the .338 would make you flinch. The .338 has a good bit more energy than the .300 win mag. But, unless you are hunting bear, the .338 really won't give you much of an advantage. The .300 win mag will take anything in North America with no problem.
  4. WMBIGS

    WMBIGS G&G Newbie

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    I've been checking into these two rounds as well. I want a dedicated elk gun. The 300 will shoot a bit flatter, but it looks like the 338 w/210 grain bullet isn't too bad in comparison.
    My main criteria is knockdown power. I don't want to track a bull for miles after his lungs have been blown out. I am not looking for power to make up for bullet placement. I just want it to be dead when I pull the trigger. I have learned the hard way about poor judgement and pulling the trigger.
    One shot-one kill.
    MikeB
  5. Mooseman684

    Mooseman684 G&G Newbie

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    Thats why I use the .300 Win Mag...one shot...one kill.
    I can shoot 110 gr to 220 gr. bullets with a lot more choices than the .338 and 26.5 lbs of recoil vs. 31.4 lbs. does make a difference.
    I normally shoot 180 Grain Bullets for Moose and caribou,and Black Bears,which would be fine for Elk.
    220 gr. for Grizzly Bears and Buffalo.
    Rich
  6. wraco

    wraco G&G Newbie

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    Both are good calibers. They are two of the four cartridges in the Winchester series of short belted
    magnums, sharing the same parent case, brought out in the latter part of the 1950's. - 458 - 338 - 300 - 264 magnums.

    The 300 win mag was brought out to replicate the 300 H&H; same performance in a shorter action. Basically a 30-06 magnum. The 338 is a 33 cal magnum that just punches a bigger hole than the 300 . Myself, I use the 300 H&H for deer and elk and the 338 win for moose and bear.

    If you handload there is quite an advantage with the 338 for deer size game by slowing the bullet down a tad, giving good stopping power without blood shot meat. A heavier bullet works better in heavy brush as well.

    Both my 300 H&H and 338 win are in pre-64 Model 70 with the 338 having a 1 inch shorter barrel. The 338 kicks more but I only notice that at the range. When you get a shot out hunting, you don't hear it or feel it, so it makes no difference.

    Another bonus to handloding for the 338 is I use the 225 gr. round nose to load for my 33 win in my old "86". I file the bullet ends flat so they work in the tubular magazine. I made a jig from a block of wood that I can file 8 bullets at a time.

    I find no difference in carrying the 300 or the 338 as both weigh about the same. Have a 375 H&H in a pre 64 M70, which is nicer to shoot but is considerably heavier to pack around, so the 338 gets to go out more.

    Regards:
    Rod
  7. Midas

    Midas Chief Troll B' Gone Forum Contributor

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    The biggest advantage the .338 has over the .300 is that it can chunk larger, and heavier bullets downrange. The .300 Win mag does shoot flatter, but you can also shoot lighter bullets in the .338, that shoot just about as flat. For an elk only rifle, I would probably just go with the .300 Win Mag, as the extra power and recoil of the .338 just isn't required. However, if you throw in grizzly bear or bison, the .338 would be a better choice, but the .300 Win Mag can surely take those animals, too. Again, the .300 is just fine, but if you just gotta have the extra recoil and power of the .338, then go with that. The .338 really isn't all that useful outside of Alaska, where large bears and moose thrive.
  8. Magnumsrule

    Magnumsrule G&G Newbie

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    YEs thnak you for all the responses. I think i would proboly go with the 300 win mag. I saw my dad shoot a bull elk at 280 yards with the nosler accubonds and it flipped it off its feet. The bullet penetrated well through the vitals and then exited out the side as it was a head on shot. The 338.s extra recoil would also be a factor in accuracy as if you cannot stand the extra recoil then the few extra foot pounds of energy are not worth it. Has anyone else talked about the 338 federal. My dad also shot a calf moose with it this year. When he shot you could see the blood or whatever come out the opposite side! the exit hole was about three inches across, again with the accubond. HAs anyone else used this bullet?
  9. samuel

    samuel G&G Newbie

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    It isnt the enitial fps/ke that makes the .300win a flatter shooting cartridge.Its the larger diameter of the .338win that has more drag and looses fps/ke faster than the .300win.They start with the .338 ballistically far superior to the .300 but the larger bullet with more drag looses fps/ke and they begin to even up at extended ranges.At shorter ranges the .338 is far superior. sam.
  10. Midas

    Midas Chief Troll B' Gone Forum Contributor

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    True
  11. Magnumsrule

    Magnumsrule G&G Newbie

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    Anyfeed back on the noslers? :feedback:
  12. jlstodghill

    jlstodghill G&G Newbie

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    I have been using the nosler accubonds out of my .25-06 encore rifle. I have taken 4 cow elk with them with a total of 5 shots. The first as at 324 yards, then 240, 224, and the last that took two shots was at 20 yards then at 30 yards. All of the bullets have gone in right behind the front shoulder and shattered the opposite shoulder. I was able to recover four of the five bullets it the opposite shoulder skin. These were factory loaded cartridges with 110gr bullets. The last elk was the only one that took more than two steps. On the other hand, I shot a 220 lb whitetail frontal shot and had the bullet leave 6 inch exit wound going out the rear quarter. There was a lot of meat loss, so I only use them on elk now. (Or the occasional coyote that pops up :27:). At the range for sighting in, I can usually keep them under MOA, but it the wind kicks up over 10 mph, I am getting a couple inches drift.
  13. samuel

    samuel G&G Newbie

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    You will never track any kind of game for miles with their lungs blown out.However if using bullets that do not have soficient energy,or do not open sufficiently to release energy to damage/destroy lungs,it makes no difference what caliber bore you have or even how deep the penetration,(all out the far side is wasted)you will probably chase them a long ways. ,,,sam.
  14. nathangdad

    nathangdad G&G Newbie

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    Well,

    the .338 mag moves you into a more specialized hunting area dealing with larger game such as elk and beyond. Hunters have found it is often just too much for deer in the sense of meat destruction. Also, for some people it is just too much recoil especially with the bullets in the 225 and heavier grain range.

    The .300 mag is sometimes described as being to a 180 grain bullet what the .30-06 is to a 150 grain bullet. It is a cartridge with a very positive long range record.

    Personally, and this is just my view, unless my goal was elk and beyond I would choose the .300 Win Mag. of the two cartridges. Note the .30-06 has a 100 plus year record of taking all species of North American game
    so it is obvious the .300 Win Mag could do the same.

    As with any cartridge remember the most important factor is "you getting good with it" when it comes to hunting success so remember to practice.

    Best of luck and good hunting no matter what your choice.
  15. HEMI

    HEMI G&G Newbie

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    I only use 200gr bullets in my 300wthby I have no use for the 180s and lighter , I find the 200s put the the 300mags into the best of all worlds catagory. Imho they are almost equal to a 338 loaded with 225gr bullets for knockdown power on moose and the like. I also find the recoil between the two similiar. Both have merit.
  16. rdale501

    rdale501 G&G Newbie

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    I am going to step in here and probably make .338 fans sore, but that isn't my intention. I think if you look at the .338 just by itself it is a fine cal. Just like most of the other cals. They do a specific job and it is up to the owner to decide how good or bad it does this job. I think if you look at it against all other cals. it is lacking. It isn't big enough to be considered a dangerous game round and there are smaller rounds that will do the job on non dangerous game as well or better than a .338 without as much recoil. However Conni Brooks (One of the owners of Barnes Bullets) hunts with one and she is not very big. I know a few people who have them and like I said they are a fine round. I just think there is a better round than a .338 for anything you want to hunt. This is just my opinion based on what I know about the round at this time.