Inherited a Raven 25 - what to do with it?

Discussion in 'General Handgun' started by Carolan, Sep 21, 2011.

  1. Carolan

    Carolan G&G Newbie

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    Hi,

    I have a small Raven 25 caliber handgun that my Mom gave me after my Dad passed away. While I have wanted to train and keep one safely in the home, I don't know if this is the gun for me - I know nothing about it.

    Is it worth keeping? Should I get rid of it and get something else? I have very small hands but this thing seems too small even for me to hang onto. I've fired a Beretta 9mm on a range and it felt pretty comfortable. Just looking at the Raven, I'm afraid it would just fly out of my hands when it kicks.

    Appreciate any advice!
  2. Huey Rider

    Huey Rider G&G Evangelist

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    If in doubt, send it to me!!LOL!! Seriously, I would take it to the range and try it out and see how you like it. A .25 doesn't have much of a kick so shoulndn't be too hard to handle especially if you didn't have any trouble handling the Berretta. Would make a good back up gun. Even if you didn't like it I would consider keeping it as it has sentimental value, having belonged to your dad.
  3. ChaZam

    ChaZam G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

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    Welcome to G&G and as you have noticed the little 25 Raven probably lacks some features one would want in a home defense or self defense gun. Since it was passed down from a family member though, it would have some intrinsic value to me if it were mine. You are right though in your estimation that other handguns would serve your needs better.
  4. MosinRuger

    MosinRuger G&G Enthusiast

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    Its probably not worth much in monetary value, so you may just be better off keeping it somewhere safe even if you don't really want to use it. hey when it comes down to it any gun is better than no gun. Like Huey said, take it to the range and see what you think, it wont kick much compared to the Beretta, although its size might make it uncomfortable to shoot.

    Good luck, be safe and enjoy!
  5. Carolan

    Carolan G&G Newbie

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    Thank you so much! You're right, when it comes right down to it I don't think I could get rid of it, since it belonged to Dad. I wish I knew where he got it from.

    Mom still has the shotgun that his granddaddy was carrying when he was allegedly raccoon hunting on a NC mountain and a logging truck ran him over. (I suspect he was coming back from or headed for his illegal moonshine still, but that's neither here nor there!) Dad was funny about that gun - if you touched the barrel with your bare hand he'd fuss, whip out a greased rag and wipe it down.

    I'll take the pistol to a shop with a range that's nearby and have them give me a hand with it. It looks like it needs to be cleaned - got some unidentified white gunk on it. It's been sitting in a closet for years so heaven knows what it is.

    Okay, another stupid (and possibly dangerous) question - at the moment I have the gun in my lock box and the clip hidden elsewhere. There's also a loose bullet in with the clip that I assume came from the chamber, but then again I don't want to assume. I can't remember what I did with the Beretta - do I just pull the slide back and look inside to see if there's a bullet in there? Or should I take it to the range and ask them to look for me?
  6. ChaZam

    ChaZam G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

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    The range would probably do that for you, but you can do that as well by pointing it in a safe direction, keeping your finger off of the trigger, and pulling the slide back to be sure there isn't a shell chambered. If you don't feel you can safely do that have the range or someone else do that, but be very careful and assume that it is loaded till you know otherwise.
  7. Carolan

    Carolan G&G Newbie

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    Thank you, you've all been very kind! :)
  8. DaTeacha

    DaTeacha Things are not what they seem. Forum Contributor

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    After you're sure the action is cleared, give it a good cleaning, aprotective coat of a good gun oil, put it in a suitable box or gun rug, and store it. Then get yourself a higher quality gun for personal use. The Raven is not a high value item, and not something most of us here would suggest as first choice for personal defense, both because of caliber and quality. You can get into a high quality .380 for not a whole lot of money, have better protection, and not risk having your dad's gun break.

    I have my dad's .32 H&R break top revolver and a couple boxes of ammo for it. I do not intend to shoot it, but I take comfort in knowing it will work when and if I need it. It's honest, simple and reliable - just like Dad. I think you will value the Raven the same way in time, if you don't already do so.

    And welcome to the site. Hang around and visit some and you'll find a very knowledgeable and friendly group of people. We are assorted ages, male and female, city and country, and we share an interest in our guns and each other.
  9. winston64

    winston64 G&G Enthusiast

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    Welcome to G&G, I am with everyone else, Safety check, Clean, oil and store. The raven was not known for it's reliability but it's a keepsake from your father, so keep it. I have an old Essex 20 ga that has been passed down for three generations and has served my family in time of need, it's not rare or worth much but it has value to me as yours would have sentiment to you. Again welcome!
  10. grizcty

    grizcty God, Guns, Glory Forum Contributor

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    Welcome to G&G.
    Cant say too much more, then what has already been said.

    The .25 Raven is my opinion.
    Good for ladies to have, I gave my oldest daughter one.
    And is a last resort gun. (better then nothing)
  11. CrazyIvan

    CrazyIvan G&G Newbie

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    It seems you are pretty new to and unsure about firearms. I suggest finding a good beginner's training class in your area. A lot of the gun shops, if they don't run a class themselves, will point you in the right direction.

    These classes will teach safety, operation of your firearms, use of your firearms, a bit of laws, storage of your firearms and ammo, maintenance of your firearms. Be sure to get into a class that will put you on the range for some real-experience time.

    These classes usually aren't too expensive and can be a life-saver, literally.

    As far as keeping your firearm and your ammo/magazines separated, it is fine for now, considering you aren't familiar with them. But, once you take a class and are prepared to be armed and ready for self defense, you will want to keep these things together, as in a life and death situation, you only have split seconds to react. If you have children in the house, of course you will need to take that into consideration. There are lock-boxes that can go in your night stand and have either a thumb print scanner or a combination input to unlock and retrieve your firearm quickly if you need it. Also, if you have children in the house - when they are old enough that you are comfortable, have them take a children's firearm training/safety course, preferably one that you can accompany them to. Being there while they are in the class will create an association - a link between what they are learning and their environment at home. It will teach them respect of firearms which is much needed in any household with children.

    Also, I will concur with keeping the Raven as a firearm for sentimental value. Purchase something more up-to-date for self defense. I will say that for a beginner, a revolver would be best. They are easy to operate, difficult to fire unless you mean to fire them (this is not to say they should be treated with any less respect), and they are easy to maintain. I'd suggest a .38 Revolver from Smith & Wesson, Colt, or another good name brand. You can find a used one for a great price, some places will have deals on new ones too. Try to get your new(er) firearm before you take the class. You will want the firearm you intend to keep and use if needed at that class.

    With your being unsure about the Raven being loaded or not, get a cheap little pistol case for it, empty the magazine of any bullets in the magazine, leave those loose bullets at home. Place the Raven and the magazine as they are (separate) in the pistol case. When you go to your local gun shop to check it out, be sure to set the case on the counter - leave it closed and tell them that you aren't sure if it is loaded. Don't reach for the case/gun/magazine or grab at it - as that can set some people off. Let them open the case and handle the firearm, until they are sure it is unloaded.

    And remember - Keep your fingers away from the trigger unless you intend to fire the firearm and always keep a firearm pointed down and in a safe direction.

    It is a good idea to go over things in your head to prepare yourself how to react. What would you do if someone came in your house while you were there? What would you do if someone attacked you? What would you do if someone got in your face and started yelling at you or threatening you. These kinds of things, just to go over in your head will help to keep you from seizing up if the time comes. I can attest to this myself. I have had a lot of run-ins with creeps. All through school, on the streets and on the road. I used to cower and not know how to react being caught off-guard. Going through it in my head, I have been able to react tactfully, strategically and correctly in some of the situations that have come up since I started thinking about what I would do in those situations. I've taught myself that my firearm is a final option, as it should be, but is always there with me should that final option come. Engaging with idiots is not something you want to do. But, sometimes you have to hold your ground silently and readily. They usually leave after they realize you have no interest in bickering with them.

    Good Luck! :)
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2011
  12. Cyrano

    Cyrano Resident Curmudgeon Forum Contributor

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    Not too much to add to what's already been said, Carolan, but I will note this.

    If you get yourself one of the Plano-type molded plastic with egg crate foam inside it pistol cases, quite common for pistol storage and transport (I have a bunch of them, each with a combination lock on it for safety) for your Raven, after you have removed the magazine and checked the chamber to be sure it does not have a round ready to shoot, and after you have cleaned and oiled it and wiped it down, wrap it in a piece of cloth before you put it in the case for storage. I learned the hard way that gun oil is not compatible with egg crate foam.

    I cleaned and oiled my Star Model S (a .380 ACP M1911 made in Spain), wiped it down, and stored it and its magazines in a Plano box. My club's range closes down for deer hunting season because we own about 80 acres, enough to hunt on safely (we have a rule: no more than 5 hunters on the property at the same time, and you have to sign up for your slots), and we cooperate with the local police who don't have a range of their own in setting up qualifications, so what with one thing and another I didn't have a chance to shoot the Model S again for 3 months. When I opened the case to check it out before going to the range, I found the foam had fused to the pistol! It wasn't hard getting it off the metal, but the grips ended up being damaged by whatever compound gun oil plus egg crate foam turns into.

    Ever since, I've taken to wrapping the pistols in soft cotton cloth (old sheet fabric or old T-shirt fabric, mostly) before storing them after wiping them down, and I have had no problems. Learn from my mistake. A pistol that has sentimental value needs proper care.
  13. PAPA G

    PAPA G G&G Enthusiast Forum Contributor

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    that sucks, but bring's up an interesting point. it would really pay to test new foam lined cases to see if there is any chemical reactions between the foam and the cleaners/oils you use.

    another good thing to use for wrapping are those dryer socks that we all seem to accumulate overtime.:D
  14. oldjarhead

    oldjarhead G&G Evangelist

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    IMO foam lined boxes are for carrying weapons to the range and only that. I don't use those things for storage...I simply hate the cheap crappy foam the Chinese use in making these boxes.

    The Raven is small enough to put in a large cardboard jewelry box similar to the box in which it originally came.

    I envy you all who receive a hand-me-down from your fathers. Keep your little Raven and cherish the memories.
  15. Ten Man

    Ten Man G&G Newbie

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    Welcome to G&G!

    Lots of good advice has been rendered, EXCEPT for the storage suggestions.

    I have done extensive personal experimentation with the storing of blued guns in humid climates.

    Storing a blued gun in a foam container or a gun rug (fleece or polywhatever lining) with out first wrapping it in waxed paper, will allow moisture to collect on the blued surfaces that contact the material, and will cause rust. A cotton cloth will be just as bad, unless it has been treated with silicone or some other moisture repellant.

    If you do intend to store it, clean and oil it as suggested, and then wrap it in a couple layers of waxed paper before storing it in the container of your choosing. Call me paranoid, but it is better safe than sorry when dealing with a sentimental value firearm.:cool2:
  16. winston64

    winston64 G&G Enthusiast

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    I use pieces of an old canvas shell half soaked in paraffin to wrap and store my Colts and my old shotgun and it seems to work very well.
  17. PAPA G

    PAPA G G&G Enthusiast Forum Contributor

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    won't the wax paper trap moisture with in the gun??? and a sealed container trap more moisture???
  18. CrazyIvan

    CrazyIvan G&G Newbie

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    Lol, can always get it vacuum wrapped. :D
  19. jbkinna

    jbkinna G&G Newbie

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    I have two of the Raven 25. I like them, easy to use, easy to clean. I have no problem hitting the target at 7 yards.
  20. Ninja Piper

    Ninja Piper G&G Enthusiast

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    Welcome to G&G! Personally, I would empty the gun, clean and oil it well, then put it in a box to remember Dad with and never shoot it. I don't trust Raven since they are essentially the same as the Davis Industries gun that blew up in my hand (same family founded both companies).
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