Marlin 39a stock refinishing questions

Discussion in 'Rimfire Rifles' started by alaskanhunter, Mar 6, 2012.

  1. alaskanhunter

    alaskanhunter G&G Newbie

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    I have an older 39a and id like to refinish its stock. What type of finish should I use? alot of people reccomend Tru Oil. How do I use it? Do you stain the stock first and then put on the Tru Oil or do you use only the Tru oil? Also when removing the old finish should I use a finish remover or just sand it? Thanks for the help, this is my first attempt at refinishing a stock and I dont want to screw it up
  2. GLS_1956

    GLS_1956 G&G Regular

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    alaska43:

    I've minimal experience refinishing stocks. but I have taken on a couple or so.

    Personally, all I have ever used for the finish is boiled linseed oil, hand rubbed in. I've been tols it can be cut with mineral spirits to get it to penatrate deeper into the wood..

    If there is a non oil finish on the rifle, you'll need to remove it prior to appling a new finish. I'd use a chemical stripper, the wet sand with increasingly fine emory paper, then apply your stain if you choose to use stain.

    Apply the boiled linseed oil sparingly, in light coats, by hand. Not with a brush. Rub in one coat, and let it dry for a few hours to a day or more. Then repeat, repeat and repeat. You might decide to give a it a light sanding with either a very fine emory paper, or ever a very fine stainless steelwool.

    I"m sure that Tru-oil has instructions for the use of their product And it will provide a good finish. But in any course. there is nothing like a hand rubbed oil finish on a stock.

    GLS
  3. swedesrus

    swedesrus G&G Enthusiast

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    Annie Oakley`s favorite rifle, Would depend on what year it was made to what the wood was treated with.......
  4. big shrek

    big shrek G&G Enthusiast

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    FYI, Tru-oil is made from BLO and other oils to give it a fast-drying quality that does not crack, cloud, or yellow over time.

    On the other hand, it does get a funky sheen with more radical colors...like Pink...which I saw in the Pink stock I did for my wife.
    So I wouldn't suggest it for a wild color, but it is perfect for the Brown/Green/Yellow color groups.

    I don't think I'd use it for anything in the Red family ever again...and I'm unsure about the blue family...
  5. Big Dog

    Big Dog Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

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    I have used both Tru-Oil and Tung Oil with similar results. If the stock is genuine walnut, a simple oil finish brings the color and figure out very nicely. I only stain birch stocks.
    To see what the stock will look like with an oil finish, once you have stripped it, wipe on some mineral spirits - this will show the post-finish color temproarily, then dry off and the wood is stripped again. If the color isn't dark enough, THEN you may try some stain in an out-of-the-way place, like the buttend under the buttplate or the barrel channel, to see how it looks.

    The more coats of oil finish you put on, the smoother and glossier it gets, but itcan be redulled a bit with '0000' steel wool.

    Good luck with it!
  6. .22hustler

    .22hustler G&G Enthusiast

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    I just refinished my buddy's Marlin M-80G, located in the Marlin section.I sanded with 200 then went to 400 for a smooth finish. I left the color natural, as it had some very nice tiger-stripeing in it. I put on 2 coats of tru-oil, using my fingers. It came out pretty nice, but I then sprayed on a nice coat of Min Wax polyurethane high gloss, and it is stunning!! I've never used the spray poly, but it is definitely my choice of finishes now.
  7. Purdy

    Purdy G&G Enthusiast

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    I would suggest that you might want to remove the wood from the rest of the gun to prevent "accidentally" sanding the metal. Personally I don't like Tru Oil as I prefer a non shiny finish. I use either tung oil or Danish oil and sand it in.
    (I wet sand using it instead of water and using progressively finer grits, finishing with 320 or 400) Then rub the still wet stock vigirously with the palm of your hand to get a classic finish. It takes time.
  8. Big Dog

    Big Dog Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

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    Early when I was refinishing stocks, I'd use a poly topcoat - not any more! I like the look and feel of oiled WOOD, not glossy 'plastic'. Poly dullcoat is even worse - takes on a 'milky' look.

    Polycoating a gun stock, to me, makes it look more like a weird-shaped table leg.......

    Just my personal preferences.
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