Removing Enfield firing pin without breaking the tool?

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by killsnapz, May 28, 2010.

  1. killsnapz

    killsnapz G&G Newbie

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    I did a search of the forum and I did not find any relavant threads about this, I have read many things online about people breaking many of the different tools that are avalible. The one thing I have not found is an article on how to make to bolt easier to remove so it does not take a tool made out of chrome molly to remove it without breaking the tool. Why are the firing pins so tight? Are they rusted in place. Are they designed this way on purpose and will always be tough to remove every time no matter what you do?
    :feedback:

    Michael
  2. Edward horton

    Edward horton G&G Newbie

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    Secret hints.

    The Enfield rifle and bolt were completely disassembled once per year by the Armourers during their yearly teardown inspection. If the firing pin became a loose fit in the cocking piece the Armourer would swedge or slightly compress the last two or three threads on the firing pin. This swedging or compressing of the threads was done with the firing pin extending out past the the rear of the cocking piece.

    In plain English the last couple of threads on the firing pin are smashed, crushed and slightly deformed.

    Now for the secret hints for firing pin removal

    1. Place the cocking piece in a padded vice and tighten down the cocking piece in the vice.
    2. Now while pushing "down" hard on your firing pin tool "thighten" the firing pin and make the swedged threads protrude from the rear of the cocking piece.
    3. Place a drop of oil on the threads sticking out at the rear of the cocking piece.
    4. Now rotate your tool counter clockwise to remove the firing pin, STOP when it starts getting tight and then turn your tool clockwise. Keep working the threads in and out, back and forth reshaping the last two or three threads until you can remove the firing pin.

    PLEASE NOTE: The prongs or fingers of your disassembly tool will BREAK OFF if you tilt the tool at an angle and are not pressing down hard.

    Press down hard and keep tool parallel to the firing pin.

    [​IMG]

    Guaranteed way to break the prongs or fingers of your tool, out of slots and cocked at an angle.

    [​IMG]

    Don't ask me why my tool is two broken sets of prongs shorter or how I got to be such an "expert". :rolleyes:

    If you try and remove the firing pin by holding the bolt in one hand and turning the tool with your other hand YOU too can become a broken tool expert. (Clamp the cocking piece in your vice and don't allow the bolt to move)
  3. E_005

    E_005 G&G Regular

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    I found it easier and cheaper to go to ace hardware and buy an 8mm x 1/4" drive deep socket then take a dremel and grind down the two prongs into it. Only cost $4 and is much stronger than the tools for sale.
  4. Edward horton

    Edward horton G&G Newbie

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    You left out the part about how most of our sockets are made in China today and my standard tool out lived the Chinese socket.

    (Brittle Chinese socket on left and still living $8.00 removal tool on right)

    [​IMG]
  5. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder G&G Newbie

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    If you don't over heat the end of the 8mm socket when grinding it to fit the firing pin you well not take the temper out of it. It well maintain it's strength and not bend the new ears off like butter. A Sears socket is about a $2 dollar bill.

    Either tool well work but as Ed said, keep it straight.
  6. killsnapz

    killsnapz G&G Newbie

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    Thanks for all of the great info guys. I knew there had to be something done to the firing pins to make then that hard to remove. Distorting the threads is a great way to ensure that the pin can not come foward on its own but it makes removing the pin a royal PIA. As an auto tech I would often do the same thing to a nut that I did nit want to come loose. I would lay a regular nut standing up on its side on the top of a big vise. Then take a good size hammer around a 2 pounder and give it a good whack. This would make the nut slightly out of round and fit very tight on the threads.

    Michael
  7. Edward horton

    Edward horton G&G Newbie

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    One of the Enfield manuals I have tells you to grind down the side of a cocking piece slightly exposing the threaded area. When a firing pin is loose just screw it into your modified cocking piece and lightly tap the exposed threads with a small ball peen hammer swedging the exposed threads.
    The thing to remember is the bolt was torn down once per year by the Armourer, inspected, re-oiled and reassembled. So don't be afraid to disassemble your bolt, you are now your Enfield's best friend and Armourer.


    A little reading material from RTFM Ed!
    Click on the link below.

    1991 No.4 (All Marks) .303 Rifle Manuals (Complete Set) - Military Surplus Collectors Forums


    Note: Original PDF file of complete book provided courtesy of MILSURPS.COM member Ed Horton.
    Ed respectfully requests that other members contribute anything they might have in return.
    Last edited: May 28, 2010
  8. killsnapz

    killsnapz G&G Newbie

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    Oh have never been afraid to tear anything apart since I was a kid. I was an auto tech for twenty years and I also did a stint working for a NASCAR crew. I also am certified by Dodge to work on Vipers and did everything to them from clutches to A/C repair to engine replacement. No little Enfield bolt is going to scare me! I have what I like to call "calibrated" hands. I can tell just by feel when something with threads is going to break instead of turning by the size of the bolt and the amount of force I am applying. Thats how I new there was something up with the firing pin just by the amount of force I was applying without getting any give out of it. The peened threads explain why the bolt does not want to move. Thanks to your help I now know what I am dealing with and how to approach it. Slow steady even pressure with some lube!

    Michael
  9. Edward horton

    Edward horton G&G Newbie

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    Good a NASCAR Crewmember and knuckle buster.

    When you go to tighten your firing pin you tighten the firing pin until the threads start to smoke and then give it two more full turns. :rolleyes:

    Signed
    NASCAR Lug nuts

    [​IMG]
  10. killsnapz

    killsnapz G&G Newbie

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    That looks like a BMW or Volvo wheel bolt? What the heck happened to it? One of my duties also included pit stops in which I was the front tie carrier. Thoses guys on TV make it look way easier than it is. If you can't pick up a mounted tire and rim with one hand then you can't do the job. The rim and tire weight about 40lbs! You have to be pretty darn strong!

    Michael
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