Restoration Project - SAVAGE ARMS Stevens 887

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Whootsinator, Oct 14, 2009.

  1. Whootsinator

    Whootsinator G&G Newbie

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    Phew... I think I may have a bit of work on my hands. This old Steven .22lr was a shoe-in on a trade made by my Uncle. I really enjoy working on firearms, even if the work is tedious, and he already planned on restoring it himself, so I offered to do the work for him. The BORE looks almost new, which actually makes this project worth it. The rifle even groups nice. He says he'll reimburse me for whatever I buy, which means I get to do something I enjoy for free, and learn at the same time. The flash on my camera makes the stock actually look BETTER than it does in person. Nearly all metal looks like it was dipped in crappy black paint. You can see the original bluing in one picture, as a stripe on the receiver.

    I plan to completely refinish the stock, and definitely replace the rear swing swivel. The front swivel is completely missing, so I guess I'll pick that up too. I may go as far as completely removing the old bluing and doing a home hotblue job. I've got an old (C) 1962 Complete Guide to Gunsmithing, Gun Care and Repair for the Home Gunsmith. Amazing book, and it will help me along all processes. It is not properly feeding cartridges, so I have to figure out that problem as well. The feed ramp needs a major polishing. It's corroded and pitted to the point that the rounds get stuck when trying to feed. With rimfire rounds, that could result in the rounds going off before they're even completely out of the magazine! That would be a disaster. It may end up being cut out with my Dremel and replaced with a new feed ramp JB Welded in. I'll add to this as I go along. I think it should be interesting to see the progress as it happens, this old junker going from rusty semi-functional single-shot parts kit to like-new!


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  2. Big Dog

    Big Dog Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

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    Bravo! I aways like seeing old .22 rifles brought back to life! The old Savage/Stevens rifles don't have much 'collector value', but are a fun educational project! Numrich should have any parts you need - no need to go the JB Weld route (though I have done that too!).
    I look forward to the 'after' report.
  3. big shrek

    big shrek G&G Enthusiast

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    There's a few parts available...but no feed throat.

    Savage, Fox, Springfield & Stevens*|*887*|*e-GunParts.com

    My favorite way to do old stocks is by hand...sanding sponges all the way.
    Retains that original look.
    I avoid cheap Minwax products...some folks get decent results, but I prefer High Quality stains like General Finishes & Old Dad's. After you've used the good stuff, you never go back to the cheap stuff. for $2 more...it's worth it :)
    Tung oil is a wonderful thing...especialy for old stocks. Check out some of the threads in the Curio & Relic section for how to do a stock in the Old Way.

    Or if you prefer, you can use Marine Grade Polyurethane/Spar Urethane for the finish coats...it does offer superior rain/weather resistance. Especially the Outdoors varieties, of which the good stuff has a sunscreen included in it.
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2009
  4. Whootsinator

    Whootsinator G&G Newbie

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    Thanks for the links guys. I think I'm going to either go the TruOil or old school home boiled linseed way.
  5. big shrek

    big shrek G&G Enthusiast

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    If you are near a Wood You chain store...they sell several oils over the counter, ready to go :)

    Store Locator

    Oh, and with THAT much rust on 'em, I think the studs & swivels can be taken off & tossed for some new Uncle Mike's ;)
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2009
  6. Whootsinator

    Whootsinator G&G Newbie

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    I definitely planned on flat out replacing them. That amount of rust and pitting is just ridiculous.
  7. Whootsinator

    Whootsinator G&G Newbie

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    Mineral spirits aren't cutting through the paint on the barrel. Any ideas?

    I'm thinking muratic/hydrochloric acid solution bath.
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2009
  8. rebel727

    rebel727 G&G Enthusiast

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    Paint stripper.
  9. Whootsinator

    Whootsinator G&G Newbie

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    Aren't paint stripper and paint thinner the same thing?
  10. big shrek

    big shrek G&G Enthusiast

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    Nope.

    The only downside to some strippers is they cause rust when removing paint.
  11. Whootsinator

    Whootsinator G&G Newbie

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    As long as it doesn't take the bluing off. I'm not positive that I want to take it off or not yet.
  12. big shrek

    big shrek G&G Enthusiast

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    Bluing is a form of controlled rust...and that's where it starts getting tricky.

    On that one...I'd actually suggest taking the original bluing off & doing a Hot Dip bluing...or maybe even Case Hardening if you feel like playing with Arsenic ;)


    Or for a Cold Blue...

    Brownell's Oxpho Blue - some decent results with this stuff...
    http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=274927&highlight=Bluing

    http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=262470

    Read the WHOLE THREAD in each case...sometimes you end up finding out that something they did early on turned out to be a goof that had to be fixed later.

    Far better to learn from their mistakes :)
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2009
  13. Fatstrat

    Fatstrat G&G Regular

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    I agree w/the Tru-oil type finish. Many people try for a mirror gloss finish that looks hincky. Just remember,these stocks were not originally finished as smoothly as most people do during restorations. 220 grit final sanding is enough. Or not much more.
  14. Big Dog

    Big Dog Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

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    Tru-Oil is merely a modified Tung Oil Finish. I have used it with good results, but began using the Formby's Tung Oil Finish when Wally's stopped carrying Tru-Oil. Both dry faster than BLO. If the twentytwo rifle will see a lot of outdoors use, the Spar Varnish could be good, but I don't care for the appearance of it myself - personal choice. Same can be said for Poly finishes - too glossy, or if using the dull-coat, it comes across too 'milky'.

    For the paint on the barrel, try bore cleaner - it softens and strips off many regular paints, and will not affect the blueing. But you may find the paint ws done because the blue was shot to begin with. If that's the case, Navel Jelly will safely strip off the blueing.

    I have tried some cold blue products, and have not been impressed. They are basically a coating, and tend to be far softer than true 'hot blueing'. You could use Brownell's Alumahyde II spray finish - a 'spray paint' made for gun use, that looks good and is very tough. The Semi-gloss Black looks very good - I have it on a few guns.
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