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1st Sous Vide cook.

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Huh? What?, Jan 11, 2017.

  1. Huh? What?

    Huh? What? G&G Evangelist

    Trying out the new sous vide cooker my daughter got me for Christmas. The sous vide cooker is a device that heats water to a very precise temperature and keeps it there. Mine is accurate to within 1/10 of a degree. You bag the food in sealed bags and put it in the water and it brings the food exactly to the temperature you want it, and no higher. It becomes impossible to overcook, say, a steak.

    So, for a ribeye, medium rare is @130 or so degrees. You season the meat, put it in the bag, and set your cooker for 130 degrees. When the water comes up to temp, you put the sealed bag into the water and wait. After a preset amount of time, the meat is at your desired temp. The nice thing is, you can leave it in the water bath for a lot longer than needed to get it to the desired temp, and it will never go any higher, and thus will remain at whatever level of doneness you want. When you are ready to finish them, you unbag them and throw them on a grill or in a pan to quickly sear the outside; a couple of minutes per side.

    My first cook subject; 2 roughly 16-oz boneless ribeyes.

    [​IMG]


    Rubbed with sea salt, granulated garlic, granulated onion, and Hatch chili powder.

    [​IMG]


    Vacuum packed so I can start cooking them later this afternoon.

    [​IMG]


    More later, as I cook...
     
  2. ACfixer

    ACfixer Global Warming Enthusiast Forum Contributor

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    Interesting. Please update...
     
    neophyte likes this.

  3. Big Dog

    Big Dog Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

    The "experts" all insist meat should be held at 160F. or so for a time, to make sure microcritters are killed.
     
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  4. Huh? What?

    Huh? What? G&G Evangelist

    Which experts? The FDA recently said that even pork can be served at, like, 145 degrees.
     
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  5. Huh? What?

    Huh? What? G&G Evangelist

    Update.

    Water preheating...

    [​IMG]


    Cooking the steaks. After taking this, I used clothespins to attach the corner of each bag to the side of the pot to keep them from being pulled into the cooker's inlet. These should cook at least two hours, and can be held as long as six hours. They will never go above medium-rare, including the quick sear on the grill at the end.

    [​IMG]
     
    neophyte likes this.
  6. ACfixer

    ACfixer Global Warming Enthusiast Forum Contributor

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    I wonder if this is how Olive Garden and suck places cook your pasta etc... I found a piece of plastic wrap in my fettuccine last time I was there.
     
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  7. Big Dog

    Big Dog Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

    Most wrappers on raw meat, several recipe articles online. It's quite common.
     
  8. Huh? What?

    Huh? What? G&G Evangelist

    Very unlikely. Pasta needs water to cook, and there is very little moisture inside a sous vide bag. Most pasta is cooked in a very large stationary trough that is heated. They put a basket with your pasta into it, much like dunking french fries into a deep fryer.
     
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  9. Huh? What?

    Huh? What? G&G Evangelist

    This link goes to foodsafety.gov's chart of safe temps for food. Note that ground meat is suggested to be 160. Poultry at 165. Most other meat is 145, and there is no actual temp given for fish.

    https://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/mintemp.html
     
  10. I'm envious! I'd love to try sous vide cooking. When you said your daughter got you a machine, I was expecting one of the pro or at least semi-pro models. Had no idea they make an immersion model like that. :)

    I need to hit Amazon to see if I can find one...
     
    neophyte likes this.
  11. Palladin8

    Palladin8 G&G Evangelist

    Poultry is the only domestic meat I'm aware of that should be served at 160. Wild game should be served around 160 as well. Especially wild pork, bear, and other known carriers of tricinosis
     
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  12. Big Dog

    Big Dog Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

    Calmness. Calmness. I am only reporting what I have personally seen. Not saying any one level is The Correct Way To Go......

    Some may be simple "Lawyer Speak", JIC.
     
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  13. tnmedic

    tnmedic G&G Evangelist

    at Pizza Hut we would pre cook the pasta and bag it in baggies for the serving size we used, then when an order came in we would pour the bag into a cup that looked like a strainer and sat that in hot water for a couple of minutes to heat up the cold stored pasta, now you know
     
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  14. That's how a lot of restaurants do it. They par cook the pasta, bag it, then reheat in boiling water.

    Now if you're going to a good restaurant, they make it fresh, but at the same time, they always have boiling water on the stove.
     
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  15. Huh? What?

    Huh? What? G&G Evangelist

    Ok, finishing up the cook. Things I noticed. When I removed the steaks from the bags, there was less than a tsp of liquid in each bag. And when cutting, no juices came out of the meat. They were very moist and the flavor of the spices went all the way through the meat. One thing I may try next time is doing a brief sear on the meat before bagging, and then again after cooking.

    Bags out of the water bath...

    [​IMG]

    Out of the bags, pre-sear...

    [​IMG]

    Searing about a minute per side at 650 degrees...

    [​IMG]

    Seared and ready to cut...

    [​IMG]

    Ready to eat...

    [​IMG]
     
    Bvhawk, tnmedic, ncnascarlady and 2 others like this.
  16. Big Dog

    Big Dog Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

    Looks yummy!
     
    neophyte and Huh? What? like this.
  17. DaTeacha

    DaTeacha Things are not what they seem. Forum Contributor

    The temperatures given as safe are from the world of bacteriology. With modern meat handling procedures taken into account, I prefer to err on the side of heated too much as opposed to too little. I am not a fan of sushi, steak tartare, and other raw flesh, especially that of critters that eat meat, like hogs and bear. Too many other parasites can be spread that way besides the usual bacteria for my taste.

    But hey, to each his/her own, and those steaks do look good, even if they're undercooked :D

    We are blessed with the largest, cheapest, safest and most nutritious meat supply in the world, but relatively recent changes (20 years or so) have had a pretty scary impact on it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
  18. animalspooker

    animalspooker G&G Evangelist

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    Man I can't even remember the last time I had a nice steak! Wow!

    I work for the health department and temps are 145 for beef, 155 for pork and 165 for poultry

    Steak and ground beef are two totally different critters though....kinda
     
  19. Huh? What?

    Huh? What? G&G Evangelist

    Totally different in that the bulk of the bad critters are going to be on the surface of a steak, where they can be seared out of existence, whereas with hamburger, the bad bugs on the surface of that beef have now been churned into the interior, where you have to cook the meat thoroughly to get rid of them.
     
    tnmedic likes this.