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Wonderment :)
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cjleete: Sir; adding 😁

Weight (loaded)​
5.38 kg​
Length​
1 095 mm​
Barrel length​
491 mm​
Muzzle velocity​
823 m/s​
Cyclic rate of fire​
750 rpm​
Practical rate of fire​
30 - 80 rpm​
Magazine capacity​
20 rounds​
Sighting range​
1 200 m​
Range of effective fire​
~ 500 m​
Maximum range​
~ 1 000 m​
The Beretta BM-59 was the first Italian automatic rifle to achieve operational service. It was developed directly from the ubiquitous Springfield Armory M1 Garand semi-automatic rifle, and primarily served the international arms market as an alternative to the M14; another Springfield Armory product, which had also evolved from the M1 Garand.

The origins of the BM-59 are rooted in Beretta's acquisition of a license to manufacture the Springfield Armory M1 Garand battle rifle during the 1950s, which at the time was the most widely-used service rifle in NATO. Most of the examples used in Europe were "hand-me-downs" from the US, many of which were well-worn from use in World War 2. As US production of the M1 was winding-down, local production in Europe had proven a godsend for NATO. Many of Beretta's M1 Garands were also exported to other NATO nations, and even states as far away as Argentina and Indonesia, and the quality of these weapons effectively re-established Beretta's reputation as a first-rate firearms manufacturer.
 

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Premium Member
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4,904 Posts
cjleete: Sir; adding 😁


Weight (loaded)​
5.38 kg​
Length​
1 095 mm​
Barrel length​
491 mm​
Muzzle velocity​
823 m/s​
Cyclic rate of fire​
750 rpm​
Practical rate of fire​
30 - 80 rpm​
Magazine capacity​
20 rounds​
Sighting range​
1 200 m​
Range of effective fire​
~ 500 m​
Maximum range​
~ 1 000 m​

The Beretta BM-59 was the first Italian automatic rifle to achieve operational service. It was developed directly from the ubiquitous Springfield Armory M1 Garand semi-automatic rifle, and primarily served the international arms market as an alternative to the M14; another Springfield Armory product, which had also evolved from the M1 Garand.

The origins of the BM-59 are rooted in Beretta's acquisition of a license to manufacture the Springfield Armory M1 Garand battle rifle during the 1950s, which at the time was the most widely-used service rifle in NATO. Most of the examples used in Europe were "hand-me-downs" from the US, many of which were well-worn from use in World War 2. As US production of the M1 was winding-down, local production in Europe had proven a godsend for NATO. Many of Beretta's M1 Garands were also exported to other NATO nations, and even states as far away as Argentina and Indonesia, and the quality of these weapons effectively re-established Beretta's reputation as a first-rate firearms manufacturer
The magazines tend to be hit or miss
 

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Wonderment :)
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adding:


BM-59SL: Converted M1 Garand, without a selective fire capability.

BM-59E: Another semi-automatic direct conversion of the M1 Garand.

BM-59 Mk.I: Basic production model as described above, with a mixture of M1 Garand components and new parts made by Beretta (a few of which are actually interchangeable with the M1 Garand).

BM-59D: This is basically an otherwise standard BM-59 Mk.I, with an auxiliary pistol grip added behind the trigger group.

BM-59R: Improved BM-59 Mk.I with a rate-reducing mechanism built into the trigger mechanism.

BM-59GL: Variant of the BM-59 Mk.I outfitted to launch rifle grenades.

BM-59 Mk.II: Added a separate pistol grip to the wooden stock, to improve controllability is fully-automatic fire.

BM-59 Mk.III: Carbine variant with a folding skeleton buttstock.

BM-59 Ital TA: BM-59 Mk.III variant for use by mountain infantry (TA is short for "Truppe Alpine"), with a shorter barrel and an integral flash hider.

BM-59 Para: Paratrooper version of the BM-59 Mk.III, with a shorter barrel and a detachable flash hider.

BM-59 Mk.IV: Squad automatic weapon variant, with plastic furniture and a heavy barrel. It is similar to the M14A1.

SP-1: BM-59 series rifles manufactured under license in Indonesia by the Bandung Weapons Factory.

BM-62: Semi-automatic-only model for the civilian market, chambered in .308 Winchester. The BM-62 was built with a different flash hider, and no bayonet lug, grenade launcher compatibility, or tri-compensator. They also don't normally have a gas compensator or a bipod.

BM-69: Improved BM-62, with a bipod and tri-compensator as standard equipment.
 
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I owned Rem 7400 carbine over 25 years, killed well over 20 animals with it. Great Guns. I had 5 spare mags. Problem is they have the Rem 700 extractor and wear out pretty easy. They are great but must be kept clean, for a hunting gun, they are great. But prolonged use, I would pull out the Garand.

The best commercial rifle us the Browning.browning semi auto 30-06 for sale on GunsAmerica. Buy a brow...

Air gun Wood Trigger Shotgun Gun barrel


They make it in blue or nickel and I have seen several in 300Win mag. I hunted antelope in NE Wyoming for many years. The Los Angeles Safari Club had a huge convoy of guys that came every year, and those are what they hunted goats with. I also saw a lot of elk hunters in SW Colorado that carried them. If you hunt elk in dark timber, they make a lit of sense.

That would be my first choice under your scenario. They are $1200-$1300 on line.
 

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I always wanted a 742 in 30-06 and when I finally found a 742 I could afford and it was a 308win, lol
They are good Guns for sure. The important part for me was how they transferred the recoil to nothing. Mine was the carbine, 18 inch barrel. I could shoot 180 grain Rem ammo in it and literally rest it on my chin. That makes them very accurate. I once killed a whitetail at 460 steps, too far for my rangefinder. I held 20 inches over his eyes, nearly 4 feet. I have killed three Boone and Crocket mule deer, two with that gun. One feature that I really like is it carried just like a Rem shotgun and fast on the shoulder.

People ask why I would let that gun go, three reasons. Like any semi auto you have to keep that chamber clean. Second, the little extractor spring loaded thing are just not very strong and wear out. Third, I was offered a hard to find gun worth twice the value of the 7400 in trade, and I thought I could always replace it with a new one, except they are no longer produced.

And at retirement I git a 257 Weatherby Vanguard and where I hunt most shots are long, so I let it go since it was just sitting in the safe. At some point we all get old and spend less days in the field and need to downsize and so I traded for a handgun that I had long wanted.

Anyway, that is my story..
 
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