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Discussion Starter #1
any of yall got one? i been reading about em and i think it may be a great thing in a lever action! i been thunkin on saving up for either a 44mag or the casull and was just wonderin what yall thought of em?
 

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454 Casull
by Clay Oldham

[font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times][/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]Handgun Ballistics[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times][/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]Distance (yds)[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]Muzzle[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]50[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]100[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]Velocity (fps)[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]1625[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]1451[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]1308[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]Distance (yds)[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]Muzzle[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]50[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]100[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]Energy (ft. lbs.)[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]1759[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]1413[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]1141[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]Distance (yds)[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times] [/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]50[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]100[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]Mid Trajectory (in.)[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times] [/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]0.5[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]2.0[/font][font=Book Antiqua, Times New Roman, Times]

Anyone who has ever fired a handgun chambered in the 454 Casull knows this a real powerhouse of a cartridge. Dick Casull wasn’t kidding around when he began to develop the 454. He built the cartridge from the ground up and, in my opinion, created the best all around (traditional) handgun hunting cartridge to ever be developed. When properly loaded a handgun hunter is equipped with a cartridge truly capable of taking game ranging from deer to the largest of dangerous game. Ballistics from a 7 ½†barrel are enough to bring a tear of joy to your eye. Take the ballistics of the popular 44 Remington Magnum loaded with a 240-grain bullet at 1500 fps the 44 Magnum generates 1200 ft. lbs of energy and a 300-grain bullet at 1300 fps generates 1125 ft lbs of energy. Compare these numbers to factory offerings in 454 Casull from Winchester, Remington, and Federal and the performance level of the 454 becomes very clear. Winchester shows a 260-grain bullet at 1800 fps generating 1870 ft lbs of energy, and a 300-grain at 1625 fps generating 1759 ft lbs of energy, that’s an impressive 634 ft lbs more energy than the 44 Remington Magnum with the 300-grain bullet. Remington is now offering a factory load with a 300-grain Core-Lokt bullet charted at the same velocity and muzzle energy as the Winchester load. Federal has joined the party producing a load utilizing the 300-grain Trophy Bonded Bear-claw. It’s nice to see the major ammunition companies producing loads for this fine round and these should only continue grow in the future.

The 454 Casull is a hand loaders dream come true. Cases are tough as nails and will last for a very long time even under the use of heavy loads. One interesting thing about the case is it has a small primer pocket so that small rifle primers may be used. This was done to help contain the high operating pressures associated with the cartridge. Which exceed the 55,000 C.U.P range in some cases. There is no shortage of bullets for the 454, in both weights (commonly 240 to 370-grains) and construction, but like anything else some are better than others. The 454 Casull uses the same diameter bullets (.451-.452â€) as the 45 ACP or 45 Colt. The problem being the bullets designed to give reliable performance in the 45 ACP or 45 Colt will not “hold up†to the velocities and operating pressures the 454 is capable of producing. A quick check to the bullet manufactures recommended velocity range and bullet application chart will prevent this from becoming a problem. I’ve experimented with a number of bullets in my 454’s from Sierra, Speer, Nosler, as well as Hornady and a few cast bullets. Sierra’s 300-grain JSP is a thick, heavily jacketed bullet with a 6% antimony core and a wide flat-nose. This bullet gives a solid “whack†upon contact with an animal and penetration is exceptional. Another bullet I’ve used in my 454 with equal results is the Speer 300-grain Uni-Core. This bullet is manufactured using Speer’s patented Hot-Cor process to fuse the bullet core to the jacket. Both of these bullets are super though, capable of standing up to the strains the 454 can dish out and still remain accurate. Nosler produces two bullets a 260 and a 300-grain in their Partition HG line. My best accuracy to date, a 2.5†five shot group at 100 yards, was shot from a rest using the Nosler 260-grain bullet. Cast Performance Bullet Co. produces several hard cast bullets suitable for the 454 and the one I like the best is the 335-grain WLNGC (Wide Long Nose w/ Gas Check). I’ve found WW296 to be the best powder for my uses in the 454 hands down. Separating bullet seating and crimping into two steps is a recommended practice. I also use a Redding Profile Crimp Die to ensure a solid and uniform crimp. This uniform crimp keeps the bullets from creeping forward under the heavy recoil of the 454. Make no mistake the recoil and muzzle blast are on the heavy end of the scale. Hearing protection is a must and some shooters will find wearing a recoil or leather glove will make shooting the 454 far more enjoyable.

It’s hard to speak of the 454 Casull without the mention of the Freedom Arms model 83 Revolver. These 5-shot revolvers are the upper echelon of the firearms world. They may be expensive but you get what you pay for; the best. The strength, manufacturing process, and attention to detail of these guns are second to none. Its worth noting at the time of this writing Ruger, Taurus, and Magnum Research are all building revolvers for the 454 Casull and Thompson Center has barrels for their Encore pistol. Both of my 454’s have been Freedom Arms revolvers. My first was a 7 ½†Premier Grade, scoped with a 2x Leupold EER held in place with a T’SOB base and rings from SSK Industries. This is the gun I shot the 2.5†group with mentioned earlier. The second and my favorite is a 4 ¾†Premier Grade with an action job from the Freedom Arms custom shop. This revolver is Mag-na-ported, and wears an Express Bead sight. Its preferred load consists of a Cast Performance 335-grain WLNGC bullet crimped over a load of WW 296 powder. When I’m in the field this little combination is the one I carry on my hip. Tucked away in a thumb-snap cross-draw holster from Freedom Arms I hardly know I have it unless I need it.

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Was gonna get one a few years back, but circumstances at the time prevented it. I had almost enough to get two pistols, one was going to be in 454 casull and the second was going to be 475 linebaugh. Now I'm just triying to save for a M1A. Perhaps I'll run into the cash to purchess them one day.

I've always liked hard kicking guns for some reason.:rolleyes:
 

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[font=Verdana, Arial].454 Casull Magnum[/font]

[font=Verdana, Arial]The .454 Casull was designed by Dick Casull and Jack Fullmer and introduced during the mid 1950's. For many years, the big .45 caliber cartridge was somewhat of a wildcat, but factory loaded ammunition is now available from Freedom Arms of Freedom Wyoming, the same company that manufactures the Casull single action revolvers in this caliber. Unprimed cases with small primer pockets and custom bullets with extremely thick jackets designed to withstand the tremendous stress they are subjected to when fired from the .454 at maximum velocities are also available from the firm.

In the muzzle energy department, the .454 Magnum produces about 50 percent more punch than the .44 Remington Magnum. Of course, you'll find no free lunch here, the .454 churns up close to 70 percent more recoil than the .44 Magnum, or about the same as a .338 Winchester Magnum in a 10 pound shoulder fired rifle.

For reduced velocity loads, the .45 Colt can be loaded in modern .45 Colt cases and fired in the Casull revolver, but only .454 Casull cases and Small Rifle primers should be used when loading the .454 performance. H110 is one of the few powders suitable for loading the .454 Magnum to maximum velocity, and it does an excellent job. Jacketed bullets weighing 260 grains and less and designed for use in the .45 Colt work equally well for reduced velocity .454 Casull Magnum loads, but they should not be used in full power loads.
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[font=Verdana, Arial]Source: Hodgdon Data Manual, 26th Edition[/font]
 

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Here's a carbine

[size=+2]Puma[/size] Length OverallBarrel LengthWeightCaliberAction TypeMagazine Capacity38"20"6.1 pounds454 Casull (45 L.C.)Lever9+1 This is a new model, as of 2002, imported by legacy sports, and manufactured by Rossi in Spain. The importer claims this to be a recreation of the Winchester model 94, though it reminds me more of the Model 73. At any rate, this is a classic lever action carbine, chambered for the current king of the handgun rounds, the 454 Casull. The 454 is a derivative of the old 45 Long Colt, of cowboy fame. The cartridge case is reinforced, and lengthened so that it can not be loaded in guns chambered for the older round. Since this gun is chambered for the more recent cartridge, it can also chamber the older cartridge, making it a nice traditional carbine companion to my 45 single action, or it can accompany my newer, Taurus Raging Bull 454 pistol.
The action is tight, and smooth, the parts well fitted, and the finish is very nicely executed. A rubber recoil pad is installed, in
consideration for those who might find themselves shooting the 454, more often that the old 45 L.C. There are traditional sights, though the gun is tapped for a scope mount. The wood is dark, smooth, and oil finished.
There are two ways, in which the gun may be loaded. There is the traditional way, through a loading gate on the right side of the reciever. The standard 45 Long Colt, loads through the gate with no problem, but the longer, 454 rounds are a bit hard to get up into the magazine tube. the solution to this, is to have the magazine open at the front, in the manner of countless 22 rifles, so that the rounds may be loaded down the front of the tube, and have the follower pushed in after them.
As with the 44 Magnum carbines, recoil is not objectionable, though it is certainly noticeable. I can fire a magazine full of the powerful cartridges (9 of them) into one ragged hole, at the pistol range. I have not yet had a chance to take the new gun out to the rifle range. Legacy makes no mention of being able to fire 45 Long Colts through this rifle, though I have tried this, and have had no problems. It may be that problems with leading of the bore, or chamber erosion would occur after time, so I may discontinue the practice, but for now I would say that this could be considered as a 45 L.C. as well as 454 Casull carbine.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
i know what ya mean thrawn, i like the big thumpers too! puma? i never heard of them? do they have a web site? nice looking piece!
 

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i do not have one, but have done a lot of shooting with a 454 revolver. the 454 is a thumper. it flat embarases the 44mag at both ends. i love my 44 but the casull is easily 3-4 times more violent in the recoil department.
 

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I passed on a Ruger .454 Casull last weekend, it was available for $250.00, and had less that 100 rounds fired through it. For some reason I have never been a fan of the .454 Casull, though I like big thumpers, that really let you know you fired them.

I like the .45 Colt (the unwashed call it the .45 Long Colt), and the .44 Magnum, but ever since I fired a .500 S&W with 440 grain hard cast lead bullets, I was immediately converted. It has 2,598 ft pounds of muzzle energy with that bullet. Last weekend I saw 550 grain, and 750 grain bullets for it, and I am positive I would never shoot either of them (supposedly over 3,000 ft pounds of muzzle energy, with the 550 grain bullet), 20 years ago, I would have, but I have no desire to break my wrist, now.
 

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I have the ruger (pos) super redhawk in 454....ITS a fun round to play with...but the recoil is ruff!!!!!! I tend to aim realy low to hit centermass. I have had a lot of problems with extraction on the ruger...sooooo Im not happy with their quality (in the SR hawk its a known design flaw that causes case to be hard to extract)...so in my mind the ruger is way way way under Hi-point in terms of quality. As for the cartrige...if you hit something with it it will go down :) when you look ar amo prices rember most boxes are 20 rounds not a normal for pistol ammo 50. In a carbine it should be a good round.

How does it compare to say a 45/70 rifle in terms of 454 rifle vs 545 rifle?
 

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Why get a .454 if you can get a .45-70? .45-70 ammo is cheaper, readily availible, more powerful, and has way more commercial loads.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
good points klaus! the only thing i can come up with against the 45-70 is reloading cost but that would be nominal. now i must thunk even more! lol which would you say would be more worth while, the 45-70 or 450 marlin or the 444 marlin?
 

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I suggest you go to some sporting goods stores and see what kind of ammo is availible. I like .45-70, and it is ridiculously powerful in a compact lever gun (or large revolver). I am partial to the Cor-bon 350s. Those are the most powerful that I can shoot in my revolver. .45 cal, 350 gr. soft point, at over 1600 FPS from my BFR. A carbine would be in the neighborhood of 1800 FPS.
 

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The Taurus Raging Bull in 454 is the first wheel gun I've wanted in some years (add the S&W .500 to the list too!!). A guy came by the shop a few months ago with a Taurus & I had opportunity to launch a few, it was GREAT! I'm pretty partial to my .45 win mag Grizzly auto, it's considerably more of a handful than the Taurus simply because it's lighter and doesn't sport that howitzer class barrel that the Taurus has.
 

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I've been thinking about someday using a BFR in 45-70 for that revolver rifle I was planning to do. The rear loading feature would allow the cylinder to be covered in the front to shield the shooter's hand from cylinder flash.

Am I right that the BFR can take the full power 45-70 reloads? I thought so because it's also chambered for 444 Marlin and 450 Marlin.
 

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the BFR can indeed handle full power 45-70 loads, any commercially available ammo is safe to fire from it. the 45-70 is a powerfull cartridge, but it looses alot of that power when fired in a revolver. imo if you are looking for power in a revolver you are better off with the 454, 500s&w, or one of the linebaughs. all revolvers get cylinder flah, even the tightly fitted freedom arms guns.
 
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