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Olin (Winchester) received SAAMI approval for the new 6.8 Western cartridge in early November 2020. It is now on the market with plenty of hype and hoopla to boost sales. If you’re looking for an excuse to purchase a new rifle then by all means follow the hype and go for it. But if you're the type who thinks more rationally....

The 6.8 Western is based on the 270 Winchester Short Magnum cartridge. It was made by shortening the 270 WSM case by a mere .08 inches as shown below. Their marketing campaign is a bit confusing because it compares the 6.8 Western with the 300 Win Mag, 300 WSM, and 7mm RM (see their comparison chart at the bottom of this post), but their chart doesn't compare it with the parent 270 WSM cartridge. That seemed a shortcoming, so what you see below is that comparison with the 270 WSM.

I'll be honest, I'm not seeing such a huge difference between the two, especially in the common hunting ranges between 100 and 300 yards. Is all the hype and hoopla warranted, or is this just part of the latest trend in new cartridges that aren't that much different from existing ones? Maybe y'all can help clarify what makes this such a bang-up cartridge that I should invest in it, because looking at this comparison I'm not feeling compelled.

159649


Here's their comparison chart used to market the 6.8 Western against 7mm RM, 300 WM, and 300 WSM, but not 270 WSM:

159646
 

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it's shooting a heavier bullet to the same velocity with 3grs. less powder in a smaller case.
what this tells me is they got a higher pressure rating for the round.

the bottom chart is just an energy and recoil comparison to other popular chamberings.
 

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The cartridge was designed with the intent to be able to seat a heavy for caliber VLD bullet out further in a short action. It also has a 1:8" twist to stabilize the heavy bullets. If the 270WSM had the faster twist the 6.8 Western many not have been invented.
 

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if they would bought into the fast twist 22-250 we built to antelope hunt with there wouldn't be a 224 valkerie.
if the US government would have accepted the 280 brit. there wouldn't be a 308 or 7mm-08, and they wouldn't be looking at a 6.8 version of that round now.
or if they simply necked up the 7 mauser to 30 cal and kicked up the pressure to the 0-6's we wouldn't have that round either.

but here we are working on the 270 Weatherby again, and mimicking the 6.5 creedmore.
 

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There was a good article on the 6.8 Western in one of the gun mags. I see the difference now; it has tighter chambering, less freebore and tighter twist (if I remember all that correctly). So, in essence it's a 270 WSM with tighter twist plus a few tweaks. I can see that it would make sense to shoot 165-175 grain .277 bullets if you are one of those who like to shoot at animals standing in the next time zone. I don't, so couldn't see the point. Others will probably want to try it out.
 

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Olin (Winchester) received SAAMI approval for the new 6.8 Western cartridge in early November 2020. It is now on the market with plenty of hype and hoopla to boost sales. If you’re looking for an excuse to purchase a new rifle then by all means follow the hype and go for it. But if you're the type who thinks more rationally....

The 6.8 Western is based on the 270 Winchester Short Magnum cartridge. It was made by shortening the 270 WSM case by a mere .08 inches as shown below. Their marketing campaign is a bit confusing because it compares the 6.8 Western with the 300 Win Mag, 300 WSM, and 7mm RM (see their comparison chart at the bottom of this post), but their chart doesn't compare it with the parent 270 WSM cartridge. That seemed a shortcoming, so what you see below is that comparison with the 270 WSM.

I'll be honest, I'm not seeing such a huge difference between the two, especially in the common hunting ranges between 100 and 300 yards. Is all the hype and hoopla warranted, or is this just part of the latest trend in new cartridges that aren't that much different from existing ones? Maybe y'all can help clarify what makes this such a bang-up cartridge that I should invest in it, because looking at this comparison I'm not feeling compelled.

View attachment 159649

Here's their comparison chart used to market the 6.8 Western against 7mm RM, 300 WM, and 300 WSM, but not 270 WSM:

View attachment 159646
Olin (Winchester) received SAAMI approval for the new 6.8 Western cartridge in early November 2020. It is now on the market with plenty of hype and hoopla to boost sales. If you’re looking for an excuse to purchase a new rifle then by all means follow the hype and go for it. But if you're the type who thinks more rationally....

The 6.8 Western is based on the 270 Winchester Short Magnum cartridge. It was made by shortening the 270 WSM case by a mere .08 inches as shown below. Their marketing campaign is a bit confusing because it compares the 6.8 Western with the 300 Win Mag, 300 WSM, and 7mm RM (see their comparison chart at the bottom of this post), but their chart doesn't compare it with the parent 270 WSM cartridge. That seemed a shortcoming, so what you see below is that comparison with the 270 WSM.

I'll be honest, I'm not seeing such a huge difference between the two, especially in the common hunting ranges between 100 and 300 yards. Is all the hype and hoopla warranted, or is this just part of the latest trend in new cartridges that aren't that much different from existing ones? Maybe y'all can help clarify what makes this such a bang-up cartridge that I should invest in it, because looking at this comparison I'm not feeling compelled.

View attachment 159649

Here's their comparison chart used to market the 6.8 Western against 7mm RM, 300 WM, and 300 WSM, but not 270 WSM:

View attachment 159646
The chart above has the wrong velocity for the 270WSM. Although I normally reload, I did buy a box of factory 150 grain 270WSM, and the muzzle velocity is 3150 fps, not 2978. So, the 270WSM is clearly superior to the 6.8 once you check out the ballistics with the correct muzzle velocity, especially if one uses the 150 gr Nosler Accubond LR, which has a BC of .625. The only advantage the 6.8 truly has is that it can stabilize a heavier bullet. Otherwise, at ranges under 600 yards, the 270WSM is flatter shooting and has more energy. Most big game animals are shot at well under 600 yards, and the vast majority are shot at less than 300 yards.
 
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