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Not even pertinent to this discussion as he has a Rolling Block.
Actually it does, the OP stated he was unsure which caliber he has. If he slugs the bore he'll know for sure if the bore diameter is .439 for .43 Spanish or .448 for .43 Egyptian

After WW II the .43 Spanish became popular in the U.S. as it was sold as surplus. Initially, the ammunition was available, but it has now become difficult to find and is a collector’s item. It is capable of propelling a .439” dia. 387 grain bullet at 1,380 fps with 1,636 ft.-lbs. of energy.

In 1870 the Egyptians began receiving the .43 Egyptian and the order was completed in 1876. It is estimated that Remington made approximately 90 million rounds in this caliber. The original cartridge was of brass and copper construction designed for Remington’s No. 1 Military rolling block rifle. The .43 Egyptian is capable of propelling a .448” dia. 400 grain bullet at 1,330 fps with 1,571 ft.-lbs. of energy.
 

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I had my KAR98 sighted-in at 100 yds for wimpy Remington 8x57 175gr. ammunition. Tried some Turkish surplus ammo I had (still have). It shot a full 13" higher at 100 yds.

Hot stuff.
Sure sounds like it! Would stick with the wimpy stuff. Only got some PPU 185 grain left. Got it for $15 per 20 many years back at a show.
 

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Upon further investigation of the spreadsheet my grandpa compiled of his collection. The rifle IS definitely Egyptian. But the caliber listed is “.43 Spanish ?”
I’ll take that question mark as it is PROBABLY in .43 Egyptian, the guy he got it from said Spanish and my grandpa was skeptical.
When it comes to unknown rolling blocks, .43 Spanish is a pretty good place to start. I think three out of every four made by Remington were in .43 Spanish.
Actually it does, the OP stated he was unsure which caliber he has. If he slugs the bore he'll know for sure if the bore diameter is .439 for .43 Spanish or .448 for .43 Egyptian

After WW II the .43 Spanish became popular in the U.S. as it was sold as surplus. Initially, the ammunition was available, but it has now become difficult to find and is a collector’s item. It is capable of propelling a .439” dia. 387 grain bullet at 1,380 fps with 1,636 ft.-lbs. of energy.

In 1870 the Egyptians began receiving the .43 Egyptian and the order was completed in 1876. It is estimated that Remington made approximately 90 million rounds in this caliber. The original cartridge was of brass and copper construction designed for Remington’s No. 1 Military rolling block rifle. The .43 Egyptian is capable of propelling a .448” dia. 400 grain bullet at 1,330 fps with 1,571 ft.-lbs. of energy.
I was talking about the Mauser part of your statement, but if this is the way you want to cover yourself, that's OK, too.
 

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When it comes to unknown rolling blocks, .43 Spanish is a pretty good place to start. I think three out of every four made by Remington were in .43 Spanish.


I was talking about the Mauser part of your statement, but if this is the way you want to cover yourself, that's OK, too.
The Mauser part is an analogy points to a similar issue of calibers if gotten wrong could cause damage to the rifle or injure the shooter and bystanders; 8MM having a .318 Dia. bullet and a .323 Dia. bullet aren't interchangeable.
The OP and anyone else need to check the bore Dia. if unsure of the caliber. Rather he be safe than sorry.

S Patrone ammunition with a .323″ diameter pointed bullet (top) should never be fired in German M88 Commission rifles. The J Patrone (bottom) with its .318″ diameter round nose bullet should be fired only in the M88 Commission rifle.
Shooting Sports USA | What You Should Know About 8x57 mm Mauser (ssusa.org)
 
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