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You put the primer in sideways.

I bet they were really hard to push in and you just never noticed they were in wrong. I've done it before with those little hand primer tools. Especially the Lee.

I think if you pull the bullet you'll find the powder in the case is fully intact and never ignited.
It doesn't matter if you put cake batter in the shell if you have the primer in sideways or upside down or what you were shooting at nor what any thing else you shot or didn't shoot.

It is plain as day that primer is in wrong to any one who has ever seen it before.

Pull that bullet and you will find the case full or empty of powder, but either way it will not be burnt.

Then resize the case and knock that primer out and you will see it was put in the pocket wrong and there is NOT a hole burnt through any thing.
I can't get the picture to blow up but that primer looks all sorts of wrong, I think that one was a primer issue and agree if you pull the bullet the powder is going to be intact and never got ignited.
^^^ That right there is most likely spot on.
 

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All of us have had similar snafus happen to us. We just try not to repeat them.
And @Apoollo Creedmore, here's a link for the introduction forum.
Why don't you swing by there and tell the G&G forum members a wee bit about yourself.

 

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It doesn't matter if you put cake batter in the shell if you have the primer in sideways or upside down or what you were shooting at nor what any thing else you shot or didn't shoot.

It is plain as day that primer is in wrong to any one who has ever seen it before.

Pull that bullet and you will find the case full or empty of powder, but either way it will not be burnt.

Then resize the case and knock that primer out and you will see it was put in the pocket wrong and there is NOT a hole burnt through any thing.
Good analysis—I’ve had this happen like I said on my SDB. While you feel some binding that SOMEHING doesn’t seem right on the upstroke of the lever, it’s not wayyyyy pronounced (not unlike a tight primer fit and sometimes the carrier binds a little bit) due to the large mechanical leverage. After time and experience you’re careful to check the round after it makes it past the next 2 stations but when you’re just getting started it doesn’t (at least didn’t to me) seem all that far out of the ordinary In terms of machine ‘feel.’
 

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i concur, the primer is seated sideways.
i run a series of [4] 550's and a 650, 75% of my focus is on the priming station, the other 25 is on the powder volume in the case, and bullet seated straight.
 

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You have the primer in sideways & if the powder ignited there wasn't enough of it to push the bullet out. I'll bet it didn't ignite because it drained out around the primer. You need to watch closely what you are doing, you should have caught that you had the primer in sideways before you ever made it to the range.
When doing a test you don't need 100 rounds 5 or 10 will do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
otherwise? P
I pulled the bullet
otherwise? P
otherwise? P
Not sure why it is doing partial posts but i.pulled the primer and I'm sure you're right. I pulled the primer and the powder was burned but it looked damaged an flat on the one side. Just was weird I got 3 of those in a row grabbing randomly out of my loads and no other issues. I appreciate everyone's help. Just want to be safe as possible. I don't take reloading lightly as I know.it can be dangerous to myself and others around if not done correctly View attachment 162280 View attachment 162280
Yup. Looks like the primer went in sideways. Lucky it didn’t go bang in the press (always wear eye protection). This is not an uncommon failure mode in some progressives usually occurring at the beginning of the batch and cause by primer misfeeding inside of the primer tube—somehow it gets flipped or turned at the junction where the sliding steel/nylon primer shuttle picks it up to take it over to underneath the cartridge. They’re SUPPOSED to feed flat but don’t always. Things to check are that the primer tube is properly seated inside the holder (on my Square Deal B the primer tube goes into the feed tube on the press and there’s a ‘key’ to ensure proper orientation of this inner tube in the press. Once it’s seated properly the knurled nut is tightened — but not over tightened — which centers the primer tube in its holder in the press. Sometimes that little plastic head on the tube gets screwed up and if that happens you might notice priming problems—Dillon is happy to provide replacements if you call them. IF the knurled nut gets over tightened, you can smash that plastic tip causing feeding problems OR sometimes the primers can get flipped when you do the transfer from the primer pickup tube to the primer tube in the press. I’m assuming you are placing the plastic guide rod/weight into the primer tube on top of the primers which also helps keep primers feeding properly by providing light pressure on them pushing them down so they can be picked up from the primer shuttle which is the block that slides back and forth horizontally and lessening the chance of misfeed and binding).

I have had this happen before; I usually notice it when taking cartridges from the completed bin and putting it in my container. I use a square deal B which is similar to the 550 except it auto sequences. The Dillons are fantastic equipment; the priming stage is always the weak link in that primers can get flipped sometimes if incorrectly loaded on pickup from the flip tray and sometimes there are feeding issues with the priming device (for me, these usually happen early in the reloading process if the press hasn’t been used for awhile—the nylon sliding primer carrier can bind if it hasn’t been used in awhile—it usually limbers up as I get further through the batch). Once you reload for awhile, you get used to the ‘feel’ of the seating primer on the lever upstroke and if there’s something wrong can stop the process. It’s an experience and tactile thing. ONE thing I’m REALLY careful of is when the batch gets interrupted for any reason to start over and examine each powder charge very carefully—at least doing a gross error check—until I get back into the ‘flow’. If there’s a cartridge with powder I put it back in the hopper and kinda do a ‘start over’ even though the SDB (unlike the 550) auto-sequences.

Like has been said I REALLY doubt any of the powder would have burned (it’d have disloged the bullet if it did; the 9 uses a taper crimp) so when you pull it the case should be full of unburned powder (or you can just chuck the whole thing).

A progressive is great but after awhile you notice when something doesn’t feel right and when you do it’s worth investigating exactly what happened.
Thanks alot for the help. The powder was all gone out of all 3 and when they fired it sounded ljust a little different than a normal fire and smoke came out of the chamber so I'm about positive it burned it. But not positive. Just not sure where it would've went. Each time I dropped the mag cleared the round and checked for obstructions and it was all clear and never noticed any powder spilled out. Di notice the primer seating seemed a lil off so.I reinsert the guide rod etc and once got going in a flow it seemed better. So Odd and coi cidental the 3 that happened to were in the same mag one after the other. Thanks again all the tips help me to troubleshoot and be as safe as possible in the process!
^^^ That right there is most likely spot on.
Thanks for all your guys help. I'm sure that was the issue. Pulled all 3 and powder had burnt in all of them and you could Gere it when fired and smoke came out of the chamber back towards me.
You have the primer in sideways & if the powder ignited there wasn't enough of it to push the bullet out. I'll bet it didn't ignite because it drained out around the primer. You need to watch closely what you are doing, you should have caught that you had the primer in sideways before you ever made it to the range.
When doing a test you don't need 100 rounds 5 or 10 will do.
I did 5 or 10 of each test to make sure of function. Then I did the bigger sample.size to make sure which had the best accuracy. I also checked every one in a case gauge and looked at all the primers as I did that. They had to be just slightly canted in the primer pocket and didn't notice only 3 out of about 250 that I had done were like that. I will definitely make sure that I check the primers more thoroughly because it only takes 1 to have things go bad.. I have have been researching and loading with guys that have been loading for decades trying to learn everything I can to make sure the process is safe as possible. I will continue to do that and know that it's a constant process of learning and developing a system that works for me. Appreciate all the advice and comments that help me to be safe and enjoy the process.
 

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Normally if the primer is seated properly the primer alone has enough power to push the bullet into the barrel.
I would say the powder drained out before being shot. Was that a mag primer? Probably the reason it went off.
 

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take a 45 colt or 454 casull case and put it on top of the plastic primer follower rod.

this keeps the primers coming down onto the primer slide better, especially those last 3-4 primers.
they can easily be jiggled around just by the primer slide coming back and picking up the primers below.
 

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Without me doing a bunch of typing I'll just leave some brief advice.
If you have not purchased a hard copy in your hands reloading manual buy one ASAP !
1, Check your work at each stage.
2, Check your work often.
3. Consistency = Accuracy, Reliability and Safety
4. Check you work again.

 

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ahh i see the problem there AK.
you got all your cases mixed up somehow...LOL.
 
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Was there residual powder in case? If not, there was no powder.
When you pulled the bullet was there anything blocking the flash hole? If flash hole was blocked, all primer pressure had to go out somewhere.
Very strange
 

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Yes, but I specifically asked if there was really any powder in the case.
Did NOT see any picture of sideways primer. Did see picture of upside down primer as example of how to inspect rounds.
 
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