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You may have a deformed primer pocket or flash hole. Check the alignment of your decapping rod. If the rod is canted or bent, correct it.
 

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Yes, but I specifically asked if there was really any powder in the case.
Did NOT see any picture of sideways primer. Did see picture of upside down primer as example of how to inspect rounds.
Look at post #7. It's clearly a sideways (crunched) primer. Luckily it didn't go off in the press but apparently did when hit by the firing pin.

I've gotten this before as well--as well as occasionally the inverted primer caused by one that flipped while the primer shuttle was cycling. r5r had a good suggestion to help eliminate this.
 
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Interesting. What powder, bullet and weight and amount of powder? When the powder ignites, it ignites. Unless it is damaged from something getting into it or very very old the explosion and pressure is the same every time within a range.

Second, what is the percent of space filled by the powder in the case? A powder like Bullseye only fills a small portion of the case and it burns quickly. If it gets a smaller than normal charge it might not have enough explosion to break the bullet loose from the crimp, obviously jacketed bullets are harder to get moving. So, the first thing I want to know is the powder and charge which gives us a hint if the load may just be on the margin of having too little powder which is my first thought.

The primer issue is secondary in my view. I do not think the powder can burn a hole in a primer or case, it happens in a nano second, so that one is interesting. From the picture I am speculating that the powder level is just too low to break the bullet loose and the explosion just tried to leak out of the primer. I have had primers like that in rifle rounds and most of us will have primers break free after many re-loads and look much like that. So, we need to know the load and are you using a powder measure or how is the powder getting into the case?
I'm loading 9mm using Bullseye. Book calls for low range 5.2 grn and really fills the case pushing 90 grn hollow point . I use Bullseye in 38 spec and am comfortable with volume in case. I looked at Blue Dot in my cook book and it shows a whole lot more powder than Bullseye maybe twice the amount than Bullseye. My reloading cave i down stairs.
 

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I looked at Blue Dot in my cook book and it shows a whole lot more powder than Bullseye maybe twice the amount than Bullseye. My reloading cave i down stairs.
I recently started loading 9mm with Blue Dot. Unique was my favorite but because of the powder famine, I'm saving it for the .45 Super. I don't use the Blue Dot for 10mm any more so I figured I'd try it in the 9mm. it does fill the case but Blue Dot likes to be compressed. just a little while ago, I loaded up a batch with 8,2 grains of Blue Dot under a 125 grain HST bullet.
 

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yes. the Lee book shows 8.2 gr. for both cast and jacketed 124 gr. bullets. I chrono graphed some test loads yesterday that I loaded a couple days ago. I haven't processed my findings yet but the cast bullets flew in the low to mid 1100 fps and the jacketed bullets (HST) went slightly less than 1100 fps. I was in a hurry when I loaded the test loads and didn't weigh every charge. the powder dropper doesn't throw Blue Dot real consistently so I had a pretty big S.D.. I weighted each charge last night so I am going to re- chrono them again. I am hoping the jacketed bullets will get closer or above 1100 fps.
 

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Is Blue Dot a finer powder and takes less room in the case. I ust don't like filling cases that much.
 

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Blue Dot is a flake powder and looks similar to Unique or Red Dot. with it you WANT TO fill the case. it burns better when compressed unlike some other powders. but for that reason, it takes more than some other powders to get similar velocity results. therefore, it is not as "economical" to use as some of the other powders. but during these famines, use what you can get!
 

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I inherited a jug of Blue Dot and havn't used it before. For years and years I've loaded pistol ammo with Accurate #5. I also inherited 1 lb jug of Bullseye. When I say inherited I was given it from a widow late husband for cleaning out her spring tank. Some where on this forum long time ago someone stated it was dangerous to compress powder in a case.
 

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different powders react differently when compressed. DO NOT compress Bullseye! it is a very fast burning powder. Bullseye is also a good powder for 9mm Luger ammo but Blue Dot will yield higher velocities.
 

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I think my old RCBS book called for 8.2 Blue Dot. Thats why I was asking about Blue Dot. 5.2 Bullseye pretty much fills case. I figured 8.2 Blue Dot would fill too much of the case.
 

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Went down to my reloading cave and looked at Blue Dot, I have maybe 1/2 lb. Question' jug says Smokeless Magnum Shotshell & Handgun Powder. Does it call for magnum load in pistols too or standard loads?
 

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Blue Dot is always at its best when loaded in max loads. it burns best in full or compressed loadings thats why it says for magnum loads but the cartridge doesn't have to be a Magnum. it is also used in standard loads but at max or close to it velocities. it is not recommended for low velocity target loads.
 

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Blue Dot ............it is not recommended for low velocity target loads.
Was it Blue Dot or maybe I'm thinking Bullseye that had a reputation for Kabooms in .38spl loads if too light of a charge was used?
Sorry it's been a long time ago for me since reading about that.
 

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Blue Dot is always at its best when loaded in max loads. it burns best in full or compressed loadings thats why it says for magnum loads but the cartridge doesn't have to be a Magnum. it is also used in standard loads but at max or close to it velocities. it is not recommended for low velocity target loads.
So its ok to load in 9mm at max load Blue Dot?
 

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Was it Blue Dot or maybe I'm thinking Bullseye that had a reputation for Kabooms in .38spl loads if too light of a charge was used?
Sorry it's been a long time ago for me since reading about that.
I think it was Bullseye. but I have heard that some other powders will detonate like that too. something about with being loose with too much air space, ALL the powder can flash burn at once (like black powder) instead of burning progressively. that is why you are supposed to use a powder that has enough volume to fill or almost fill the case. from what I have read, those kabooms are caused by light powder charges in large capacity cases. of course yon can also overcharge a case and get a kaboom too. thats why we have reloading manuals where the manufactures have tested the loads for us and tell us which powders to use and how much. if you stay within the book's specs, your kaboom will be caused by something else. not your powder charge.
So its ok to load in 9mm at max load Blue Dot?
yes.
 

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I think it was Bullseye. but I have heard that some other powders will detonate like that too. something about with being loose with too much air space, ALL the powder can flash burn at once (like black powder) instead of burning progressively. that is why you are supposed to use a powder that has enough volume to fill or almost fill the case. from what I have read, those kabooms are caused by light powder charges in large capacity cases. of course yon can also overcharge a case and get a kaboom too. thats why we have reloading manuals where the manufactures have tested the loads for us and tell us which powders to use and how much. if you stay within the book's specs, your kaboom will be caused by something else. not your powder charge.

yes.
I think this is very sage advice, especially when dealing with a standard loading or something very efficient like the .40 or 9.

BUT

Sometimes there's 'nonstandard' situations which come up (not talking about those cartridges previously mentioned). I've noticed in newer times the manufacturers 'derating' some of the cartridges (I gotta think this is over liability concerns) beyond the realm of normalcy (and powder composition DOES change which I have to keep in mind).

Specifically, if I look at most modern .44 special loadings from the manufacturer with Universal and lead bullet, they are incredibly weak. Now, this is probably because their powder and bullet combo is to be used in a huge spectrum of potential revolvers, including perhaps some older, weaker ones. I'm not one for the huge thumpers, but these are wayyyyyyy low.

Now, the Skeeter load is probably near the upper end of what a prudent person would put through his .44 in good condition (and has been around for a looooong time). But it's well above the Universal max load with the Keith (from the powder manufacturers loading data). Brian Pearce did some decent work delineating .44 special loadings so I use that and do what every reloader does (start with something above the min but below the max and work up to something reasonable). And come up with a load in the high 900s with the Keith bullet (slightly hotter than the skeeter loading but pretty close).

I wouldn't put that through my Bulldog (although I don't think it would blow it up), but it's perfectly comfortable in my Smith 69 .44 Magnum while having enough performance for anything I might run across.

So that's one of the joys of hand loading, but I've found newer data seriously lacking in the ability to balance performance and pressure in the stronger revolvers. The 'one size fits all' doesn't fit some of my situations.
 
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I think this is very sage advice, especially when dealing with a standard loading or something very efficient like the .40 or 9.

BUT

Sometimes there's 'nonstandard' situations which come up (not talking about those cartridges previously mentioned). I've noticed in newer times the manufacturers 'derating' some of the cartridges (I gotta think this is over liability concerns) beyond the realm of normalcy (and powder composition DOES change which I have to keep in mind).
the 10mm auto is a prime example of this.
 
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