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A bigger gun

Discussion in 'Varmint Hunting' started by Rambo, Feb 1, 2017.

  1. blaster

    blaster G&G Evangelist

    the reason they catch, castrate & release boars (called a barr now) is to make them better eating next time they get caught or shot. usually they will notch the hog's ear or cut off the tail when they castrate him. that way when you see a marked barr hog", he is the one you want to shoot.
     
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  2. writerinmo

    writerinmo G&G Evangelist

    The Department of Conservation here in Missouri made it illegal to hunt hogs on land owned or managed by them, citing that same reason. However, they are finding that the feral hogs are learning about traps. Recently they set up at one of the neighbors places here with one of their usual traps, and on the game cams you can see the hogs come up and stop just outside the perimeter, sniff around, then leave. They only managed to catch 10 the first night, then 3 the next. Now they want to spend a ton of money on remote control traps called "Boar Busters" that can be monitored on a computer or smartphone and the trap triggered remotely. But these traps won't work in much of the state due to rugged terrain and/or lack of a good cell signal.
     
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  3. writerinmo

    writerinmo G&G Evangelist

    A notched ear here means it's not a wild hog, or at least wasn't initially. I sighted in a scope on a neighbor's .270 for him, last fall he stopped in and told me that I did a good job, he popped two hogs at the bottom of his pasture at about 200 yards. Both had notched ears so he checked with other folks up and down road and found out that they belonged to a neighbor but had escaped the pen the first night over a year ago. They weren't upset but he did give them half...lol.
     
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  4. ChaZam

    ChaZam G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

    Not to be nit picky but after castrating a boar it is a barrow...
     
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  5. blaster

    blaster G&G Evangelist

    you are correct. barr is short for barrow. I guess I've called them that so long i forgot the full name.o_O
     
  6. Cyrano

    Cyrano Resident Curmudgeon Forum Contributor

    I saw a video of people hunting them from helicopters in Texas. The chopper outfit provided special AR-15s set up with brass catchers, and swept over a ranch with a feral hog problem like a harvester in a Kansas wheat field. They killed a ton of them; I don't know how many, if any, of the carcasses were salvaged and donated to charity or turned into sausage, hams and footballs. The situation down there is so bad, you can kill a hundred of the critters and a month later come back and do it again.

    I think a VEPR in 7.62x54R with softpoints would do nicely against those hogs. Wouldn't try a Mosin unless I was shooting from the back of a truck. Saw a video of a man who took one big hog down at 320 yards with a 91/30 with a single shot. The cartridge is up to the drill; the question is, should a bolt action be used for the mission unless you are shooting from a stand or a vehicle. Given how mean a wild hog can get, I think a fast second shot would be mighty reassuring.
     
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  7. Rambo

    Rambo I just shot your dog in this fight Forum Contributor

    I hunted for this big boar for two hours after dark but it was a no show. My friend doesn't know if it's been castrated already as no one can get close to it. I'm going back down next week to focus on it and many other hogs. Probably skip calling cats but will still call coyotes. Need a javelina as well to rep[air the damage our puppy did to a full mount we have.
     
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  8. ChaZam

    ChaZam G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

    That poor little puppy surely gets blamed for a lot of things Tom...
     
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  9. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper G&G Enthusiast

    44
    128
    Michigan
    No way does Texas have a feral hog problem. Farmers and ranchers are just saying they have a problem so they can milk the state for crop damage money.

    I have several friends who hunt far north Ont. Ca. white tails and decided it would be fun to go hunt wild pigs in Texas. One of them has kin folks down there and was asked to contact farmers and ranchers where they could hunt for a couple pigs a piece. They were sent back a list of names and made contact with about a dozen. Everyone wanted $500.00 and more per day per hunter then something like $100.00 for each pig they shot. What’s the $100.00 for they asked and was told to pay for the pigs they shot; they were still responsible for retrieving the pig and the butchering of same.

    They never did go figuring it was just too costly to deal with what they had under stood was a crop destroying land wrecking varmint.

    :D Al
     
  10. Palladin8

    Palladin8 G&G Evangelist

    Make no mistake Texas does have a problem with hogs. Ranchers have found that they can charge people and they will gladly hand them their money so they can shoot them. Texas is one state that has a huge majority of private land. Unlike many states where they have a lot of state land or BLM controlled land that is open for public use.

    I can honestly say if I were to have a large ranch I wouldn't want every Tom, Richard, and Harry running around at night shooting at wild hogs. Don't know if they would mistaken my live stock or accidentally shoot one while missing a hog.
     
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  11. Thats what i HATED about texas.
    You cant get out of your car without trespassing.
    Only the rich get to go huntimg or shooting.
    No public land.
    Thats why states like colorado are overrun with texan hunters
     
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  12. Palladin8

    Palladin8 G&G Evangelist

    My friend pays a few thousand a year to lease land to hunt on. He had to search for quite awhile and then wait until someone decided not to renew their lease. That's not what I want to do so I can go hunting. One of the major reasons I wouldn't move to Texas if the opportunity arose.
     
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  13. Sav .250

    Sav .250 G&G Evangelist

    They certainly are !!
     
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  14. Rambo

    Rambo I just shot your dog in this fight Forum Contributor

    I hunt Texas every year. I don't own property there or even lease land. I hunt with the landowners permission. When I first hunted, I paid some landowners. Years ago, my rancher friend asked me if he could give out my phone number to ranchers with hog problems. I said "Hell yeah!"
    Now I hunt pretty much for free. It took awhile but can be done. I've even taken many friends down with me, along with family. That was too much work. I hunt mostly alone these days.
     
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  15. Rambo

    Rambo I just shot your dog in this fight Forum Contributor

    The same goes in Iowa. Once people get to know you, gates are opened. I killed some coyotes on a woman's farm once. She gave my name and number to friends and now I have lots more land available.
     
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  16. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper G&G Enthusiast

    44
    128
    Michigan
    There is a group (9 now)of us who love to hunt coyotes and probably now spend more time and effort hunting them than any thing.
    We all own our own hunting land, friend John owns the most and raises beef cattle. About 8 years ago he went to get some feed ground at the mill. While they were doing it he went to the common area where some farmers were talking about a coyote problem. John volunteered us to take care of the problem. Since that first farm 15 years ago we have gotten permission to coyote hunt 22 other farms by word of mouth. We have permission to small game and bird hunt 18 of those farms. We have permission to bow hunt deer on 4 farms and gun hunt on 1 so far.

    :D Al
     
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