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This appears to me to be a Prussian 1809 that at some time has been converted to a percussion ignition, I will include a picture of an 1809 Potsdam Prussian in flintlock and percussion.
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Glad I could help! Why don't you go over to the Introduction Forum and introduce yourself to this fine community...Welcome to G&G.
 

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^^^I think you are correct! GrayrockVolunteer, please go over to the Introduction forum and introduce yourself to this fine site..Welcome to G&G!
 

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That double headed eagle stamp looked allot like the Russian stamp I had on a Tula 1897 dated 1891 Mosin.
Russians used brass barrel bands and converted flinters to percussion ignition in late 1830's early 1840's.

That double-headed eagle served as the crest of Czar Nicholas I
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In 1841, with the adoption of the percussion cap for ignition, the Russians began the process of converting their flintlock muskets to the percussion system, thus the designation of Model 1828/44, a percussion conversion of the Model 1828 musket, based upon 1844 specifications. The actual conversion to percussion has features that are both familiar and somewhat odd. The gun bears the classic, heavy “bent” hammer common on “Belgian” or “cone-in-barrel” conversion muskets, and has had a bolster “lump” brazed onto the breech where the cone (nipple) is installed. This type of lump is encountered on French, Belgian and Austrian conversion muskets of the same period. The less common feature is that an iron plug with a round head has been installed in the old flintlock vent hole, with the head of the plug being supported by the recess of the brass pan. Most other conversion of the era brazed or welded up the touchhole and then filled the brass pan recess. The musket in Russian service during the early and mid 19th Century was really nothing more than a glorified pike, with the basic Russian infantry tactic being an overwhelming bayonet charge that would force the enemy from the field. In fact the credo known as Suvorov’s Apophthegm was “The bullet is a fool “ The bayonet is a hero!”.

For a long time, Russian small arms were patterned closely after French designs – the Russian 1809 family was based on the French 1777 muskets.

 
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