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Activists Pursuing Legal Status for Animals

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Doglips, May 23, 2002.

  1. Doglips

    Doglips G&G Newbie

    I got this off ABC NEWS online..I cut the intro about what got this started...Ill be happy to post the like if someone wants it.

    Just something for you hunters to think about..next time the deer's lawyer may be sueing you. Hummm what is the minium calaber needed for hunting a Lawyer...

    Fighting for Moe
    Activists Pursuing Legal Status for Animals One Case at a Time

    By Amanda Onion

    "Any animal — at least one with a sense of self — should become eligible for legal rights," says Wise, a lecturer of animal law at Vermont Law School and Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine and author of the new book Drawing the Line.

    Rather than being regarded as property, as animals now are, chimpanzees and other higher mammals should be represented directly in courts in the same way that abused children are appointed legal guardians, Wise argues.

    Wise has been leading the cause to grant higher mammals the right to have suits filed in their names. He says his strategy is to begin the battle for chimpanzees and eventually win similar rights for other animals.

    Laurence Tribe, a professor of constitutional law at Harvard University, points out that so-called legal persons status is now granted on behalf of corporations and ships and buildings — so why not animals?

    "I can't see why chimpanzees and dolphins, to name just two extremely intelligent examples, should be deemed any less worthy of such classification," says Tribe, who argued before the Supreme Court on behalf of then-Vice President Al Gore during disputes over the outcome of the 2000 elections.

    Tribe adds, however, that granting such status would not suggest any animal is the legal equal of humans.

    "There are rights ... and there are rights," he says.

    Wise is now drafting a declaration of rights for apes, which he hopes international leaders will sign by the year 2010.


    :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :confused: :p
     
  2. SPOCAHP ANAR

    SPOCAHP ANAR G&G Enthusiast

    "I can't see why chimpanzees and dolphins, to name just two extremely intelligent examples, should be deemed any less worthy of such classification," says Tribe, who argued before the Supreme Court on behalf of then-Vice President Al Gore during disputes over the outcome of the 2000 elections.


    Well; he did argue on behalf of a JACKA&& last year, so atleast he is consistent.