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How about pine trees. If you shave one to the inner bark (the first layer where you see white. It is quite edible and has lots of carbs.

Once cones have developed, they have good size seads inside, which are very delicious slightly roasted. They are full of vitamins and minerals.
The black for indians used to stone grind pine cones. Then mix with lard, and cook on a rock to make a kind of bread.
I have ate both pine nuts, which I thought were a great treat.
I have also ate dinner bark on a few of my survival outings. An acquired taste but fills the bellies, kinda has the effect of a big bowl of spaghetti. Energy wise. You can either lay down and take a nap afterword or push on and benefit from that carb high.
I like pine nuts with veal, but the "meat" of the tree tastes bad and has an unpleasant texture. Tea made from the bark of long-leaf and loblolly pine "meat" is an old-wives cure-all for congestion, and hot resin can be used like Vapo-rub. The sap or pitch can be used as poultice for different types of wounds; pitch for weeping wounds, blisters and toothaches, and the sap and resin for bleeding wounds as the "meat" can be ground into a paste for styptic.
 

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Willow bark is going to be incredibly useful...
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aspen i also useful.
they used [still do?] to make aspirin from the inner bark.
good dry aspen is also a great fire starter, peel some bark and scrape at the inner lining to foof it up.
a little spark and it'll get going, we use it all the time when out hunting and packing.
 

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My grandfather used to go out round about the beginning of September and dig ginseng up through the end of October. He'd dry it and go up to Paintsville, KY to sell it. They had some Asian buyers come through around Thanksgiving time every year. That stuff goes for hundreds of dollars a pound. It was how he made Christmas money many years.

He'd save just a little bit for personal use. He affirmed that a dose of ginseng would put the lead in a man's pencil. ;)
 

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Wild ginseng hunting has gotten so bad in the NC mountains that it's illegal and comes with serious fines and jail time. The "hunters" were stripping huge patches bare instead of carefully harvesting it so more would grow back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 · (Edited)
Wild ginseng hunting has gotten so bad in the NC mountains that it's illegal and comes with serious fines and jail time. The "hunters" were stripping huge patches bare instead of carefully harvesting it so more would grow back.
Yep we still have a right to take it but Ohio has limits on the size of the root you can sell. To small and they go to jail for buying it. Shame it has to come down to that.
 

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Most of us live by a small lake or water source that has cat tails growing in it, did you know they are eatable?
In fact they may be the ultimate survival plant. Who knew??
Cattails actually produce more starch per acre than potatoes and were almost helped the US win WWII.
 

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the roots are the best, but you gotta watch what time of year you take the various parts.
too late and they are more bitter than that milky sap stuff you get from a dandelion.

oh and those are NOT wild hot dogs, but they do poof something marvelous in december when you hit them with a load from a shot shell.
 

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Most of us live by a small lake or water source that has cat tails growing in it, did you know they are eatable?
In fact they may be the ultimate survival plant. Who knew??
Cattails actually produce more starch per acre than potatoes and were almost helped the US win WWII.
I have read stories about using cattail pollen to stretch flour supplies
 

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repeating-adding. Reading 🤓 a link.



Cattails: Swamp Supermarket
The United States almost won WWII with cattails.
No green plant produces more edible starch per acre than the Cat O’ Nine Tails; not potatoes, rice, taros or yams. Plans were underway to feed American soldiers with that starch when WWII stopped. Lichen, not a green plant, might produce more carbs per acre. One acre of cattails can produce 6,475 pounds of flour per year on average (Harrington 1972).

Cattail pollen
Two species of cattails are common in North America today. One is Typha latifolia (TYE-fuh lat-ih-FOH-lee-uh) the other Typha angustifolia (an-gus-tee-FOH-lee-uh.) Typha is from Greek and means “marsh” — now you how “typhoid” got its name and Typhoid Mary. Latifolia mean wide leaf, angustifolia means skinny leaf. Besides that difference, the T. latifolia likes shallower water, the T. angustifolia deeper water, but it is not unusual to find them living side by side and also crossbreeding — L’angustifolia perhaps. Cattails get their name from their mature brown cylindrical flower spikes. When I was a kid we used to used the dried spikes as torches while skating in the winter time. The end of season fluffy “tails” make excellent tinder and the Indians used them insulation, mattresses and absorption
 

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I wonder how many useful plants have been lost through the centuries. The Romans drove a plant to extinction that acted as a birth control. I read an article that India has lost more than 3000 medicinal plants over the centuries, and there are dozens of critically endangered ones. There are dosens of native American plants that have gone extinct, and more that are endangered.

I once interviewed the last medicine woman of the local band of Muskogee. She showed me a journal of a previous medicine woman that contained a single, pressed, blue flower. The flower cured migraines, among other things, and only grew in one area of Escambia County. When the government built the Indian school in the early 20th Century, they bulldozed the area where the flower grew, and they never came back. The current medicine woman had had her flower analyzed to see if it grew anywhere else, or even had a name. Nope, it was a novel species.

I also read that we only have a fraction of the plant diversity that they had a century ago, and previous generations suffered from less diversity than their fore-bearers. (Actually around 1/4, What is Agrobiodiversity?)

Just since the 1950s we have lost several banana, apple (86%, What is Agrobiodiversity?), fruit and vegetable varietals due to over-harvesting or blight, as well as several species of fish due to overfishing. Flipping through any good vintage cookbook you are bound to find something that has to be substituted. Even the milk and cheese we get has less diversity than just 40 years ago (How Globalization and Climate Change Are Taking Away Our Favorite Foods).

We lost a popular variety of pear around 1920, the most popular type of banana in 1965, and countless varieties or tart apples and persimmon over the last 200 years. Chocolate, agave, Arabica coffee beans, peanuts, several species of wine grape, honey, avocado, and maple syrup are the most likely losses over the next 30 to 100 years.

It's even worse when you think about the meat that has gone extinct, or even "cheap" meat that has become expensive luxury due to increased rarity.
 

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I wonder how many useful plants have been lost through the centuries. The Romans drove a plant to extinction that acted as a birth control. I read an article that India has lost more than 3000 medicinal plants over the centuries, and there are dozens of critically endangered ones. There are dosens of native American plants that have gone extinct, and more that are endangered.

I once interviewed the last medicine woman of the local band of Muskogee. She showed me a journal of a previous medicine woman that contained a single, pressed, blue flower. The flower cured migraines, among other things, and only grew in one area of Escambia County. When the government built the Indian school in the early 20th Century, they bulldozed the area where the flower grew, and they never came back. The current medicine woman had had her flower analyzed to see if it grew anywhere else, or even had a name. Nope, it was a novel species.

I also read that we only have a fraction of the plant diversity that they had a century ago, and previous generations suffered from less diversity than their fore-bearers. (Actually around 1/4, What is Agrobiodiversity?)

Just since the 1950s we have lost several banana, apple (86%, What is Agrobiodiversity?), fruit and vegetable varietals due to over-harvesting or blight, as well as several species of fish due to overfishing. Flipping through any good vintage cookbook you are bound to find something that has to be substituted. Even the milk and cheese we get has less diversity than just 40 years ago (How Globalization and Climate Change Are Taking Away Our Favorite Foods).

We lost a popular variety of pear around 1920, the most popular type of banana in 1965, and countless varieties or tart apples and persimmon over the last 200 years. Chocolate, agave, Arabica coffee beans, peanuts, several species of wine grape, honey, avocado, and maple syrup are the most likely losses over the next 30 to 100 years.

It's even worse when you think about the meat that has gone extinct, or even "cheap" meat that has become expensive luxury due to increased rarity.
There's a handful of old-timers in Western North Carolina trying to preserve the heirloom apples.
 

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We had a cider apple tree and a pear tree at the farm. The apples were small and tart, and incredible. I've spent hours online on Google images looking for them and I can't find anything. The pear tree produced really soft, sweet pears that lacked the gritty feel of most pears. Likewise, I can't find any pears that look like them.

My grandaddy grew the trees from cuttings off of old dying trees at the original homestead.
 

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PaleHawkDown: Sir; adding 🤔

Silphium was used by the Romans as a form of herbal birth control. They used it so often, in fact, that the plant went extinct before the fall of the Roman Empire
 
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