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Premium Member
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2,942 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, the latest virus has many people in a panic as you all know, and some everyday products we have learned to take for granted are no longer readily availible. I figured this thread would be a good place to discuss suitable alternatives to those needed products. There have been quite a few good threads on here discussing similar topics, but since the frenzy is here I figured a fresh thread would be in order. Lets talk cooking, hygiene, potable water, medicines, tools... If you can think of it, I'd like to hear it.

I'll start - - since TP is the latest running joke, there have been many funny posts about alternative paper sources. Hillary's book keeps popping up and I agree... Good source of paper. But the thought of wiping with a piece of paper out of her book sounds like it would be almost as painful as reading the damn thing. So, before you rip a page and go to town wiping, try working that page over the edge of a table like you are buffing a shoe, flip and repeat. You will now have a piece of paper worthy of wiping the tenderist of hiney's lol. Do this in advance to all the pages and you will be prepared.
 

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Premium Member
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24,307 Posts
Here's a household germ killing hint that is suitable anytime. If you use those scrubbing pads at the kitchen sink that are a sponge or a sponge backed with scotch brite, rinse and squeeze the excess water out of them and toss them in the micowave for a minute or so. That'll zap the bacteria and other harmful things that might be on that scrub pad. As handy as they are they are also magnets for bacteria and germs, but their useful life can be extended greatly and safely by this simple practice while protecting ourselves or our guests...
 

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Handgunner
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9,175 Posts
Isopropyl alcohol is 91% pure. However, isopropyl alcohol taken internally or inhaled can cause severe problems such as internal bleeding. Everclear is a cordial that can be found at any liquor store and has the same percentage of alcohol. The difference is that Everclear is a grain alcohol and is not toxic.
The only difference between 70% and 90% isopropyl alcohol is the water content.
To know the content of alcohol, divide the proof value by 2.
Listerene was originally developed as an antiseptic and can be used as a hand sanitizer.
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #11
I talked about this item when I first joined here - - and it doesn't apply to you boys, but is something to consider having on hand for the women in your lives. Menstrual cups are a good alternative in the absence of tampons. They work well and are reusable with proper care.
 

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Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler
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36,215 Posts
Amazon has a product called "Dude Wipes". Similar to baby wipes, but intended for us dudes. They are made to be flushable in the toilet.
 

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Less well known member
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In Asia, South America and other parts of the world the sewer systems are not able to deal with any toilet paper. Typically there will be a covered trashcan next to the toilet. This is where the used paper goes.

Something to consider rather than messing up your plumbing or septic system with alternate cleaning products.
 

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Wonderment :)
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33,298 Posts
Mindy up North: Ma'am, my fathers mother made soap. Sometimes the smell (done outside)
was horrible. Lye
I tried experiments:) with Wrigly Spearmint wrappers; aluminum foil
And pint jars sealed tight :)


Can You Make Soap Without Lye?
Often, the biggest concern with soap-making is the lye, and this was one of my biggest concerns as well before I researched it.

Lye comes with its fair share of warnings and with good reason, but that doesn’t mean that the finished soap product is in any way dangerous. The most often asked question on my soap recipes (like my basic slowcooker soap or my charcoal bars) is “can I make soap without lye?” The short answer is no, but the long answer requires a little science…

What is Lye?
Chemically, lye is Sodium Hydroxide, a caustic alkali. It can eat holes in fabric and skin and cause severe reactions with other chemicals. For soap, the crystal form of pure Sodium Hydroxide is used (this is important!) and the lye must be added to water, not the other way around.

Sounds dangerous… right?
 
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