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springfield 61,73,84?? would be my guess.
they all used a muzzle cap like that and twisted into place.
however i don't know those rifles or bayonet's very well.
 

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LHS, is the blade cruciform or triangular in design?
 

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Looks a bit like an 1853 Enfield bayonet. The later pattern Enfield bayonets, and all the Springfield bayonets had a collar on them.

That said, I couldn't really tell you without knowing a couple more things:
1. Could you please take a picture of the other side
2. Is that bronze paint, or is this thing actually brass or bronze?

This general style of socket bayonet goes all the way back to before the Revolutionary War with only a few changes until the mid 1850s when people started adding retention collars to socket-style bayonets.

It appears to be an English or American pattern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Will have to post more photos tomorrow when I get up.
 

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Did you figure out what the material was?

This thing has no transverse or locking slot, and that has made it a little hard to find info on in my bayonet books and online.

If it is brass or bronze, this means:

1. This was meant for a toy gun. If so the brass or bronze would make sense as a material, but the tip should be rounded or blunted, or have a ball on it. You do not show the point in your pics.

2. It was meant for display or parade purposes

3. It was homemade.
A. Every once in a while something like this will pop up listed as a "homemade" bayonet for American use in the Revolutionary War.
B. These also sometimes pop up as "hunting bayonets" used largely for mounted boar hunting. They were non-slotted, and American versions tended to be cast rather than forged (iron or bronze). The idea was to get it into the wounded boar, and with a twist you could remove the bayonet from the musket to detach you and your rifle from an angry, wounded pig.

If it is steel, and has just been spray painted to look brass or bronze, here are my best guesses:

1. It looks a heck of a lot like the non-slotted version of the French 1774 model bayonet, but missing the spring locking collar that secured it to the rifle. This bayonet family shares a lineage with both the British and American socket bayonets in terms of overall blade design.

2. This thing used to have a longer socket, that contained the transverse and locking slot, and someone cut the slotted part off at some time

3. It was homemade. See previous #3.

Hopefully I can find out something a little more definite.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Forgot: Steel painted. Decided to put it up for sale. Any interest make me an offer!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Putting it in the local antique mall with a $75 price on it.

We shall see.
 
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