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We normally have plenty of them but there have been years where there are massive die offs and reports of huge migrations to different locations where people have spotted them in large numbers swimming across the lake. I don't know what is going on with your area . If you are sure that that their food supply is still available, they should be there. I have had my best luck at first light . They usually get out and get eating and you can hear them cutting nuts. A good stand of hickory or oak trees is always my go to locations. Good luck! It can be frustrating. Ask around in your area.
Why look up in the trees? If they are swimming just use a dip net.:D:D
 

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information: Excellent side-dish with a plate of BBQ or a bowl served alone

https://www.thecountrycook.net/brunswick-stew/

Brunswick Stew. The story is told that it was invented right here in Virginia. Brunswick County, to be exact. So most folks here in Virginia lay claim to this hearty stew. And they are serious about it. Deadly serious. Although, I’ve had the discussion with some friends in Georgia who believe wholeheartedly it was invented there. Both sides have very precise stories on exactly how it was first made so I guess we’ll never know the truth. And does it matter? We all got this delicious stew outta the deal. It’s a great, hearty, rib-sticking stew. Like any good, old recipe with lots of history, it has many, many variations. Kinda like barbecue. This here is just my version.
 

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information: Excellent side-dish with a plate of BBQ or a bowl served alone

https://www.thecountrycook.net/brunswick-stew/

Brunswick Stew. The story is told that it was invented right here in Virginia. Brunswick County, to be exact. So most folks here in Virginia lay claim to this hearty stew. And they are serious about it. Deadly serious. Although, I’ve had the discussion with some friends in Georgia who believe wholeheartedly it was invented there. Both sides have very precise stories on exactly how it was first made so I guess we’ll never know the truth. And does it matter? We all got this delicious stew outta the deal. It’s a great, hearty, rib-sticking stew. Like any good, old recipe with lots of history, it has many, many variations. Kinda like barbecue. This here is just my version.
Sounds so good haven't had that in a while. Had forgotten all about it.
Had it with squirrel once or twice. Deer once.Also my uncle used to make a version of it with groundhog. Got 3 squirrels quartered and in the freezer. Might just head out in the morning and see If I can get 2 or 3 more. Thanks for the link to the recipe. If I am lucky, I will be using it tomorrow night.:)
 

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Only time I have had a problem filling my limit is a few years back. No acorns very few hickory nuts and the farmer had soy beans in the field for 2 years running. I saw several with ruck sacks traveling down the road one day where there was a corn field.

:D Al
 

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There was one outside my bedroom window not further than 18-20 feet away. I thought to myself: that is an incredibly easy shot. So I went to the closet and pulled out the Henry carbine. I leave the empty casing in the chamber as a rule when I've got it in the house. So I worked the lever but it didn't eject. I didn't notice this at first and began to close the action back. This caused the following cartridge to deform. So now I'm totally screwed up. The squirrel obviously got away.

I've got an obstruction in the chamber and a live cartridge lodged in the magazine feed assembly. So I pulled the follower out of the tubular magazine and dumped the remaining cartridges. I went out to the garage and pulled out a .22 cleaning rod and a couple of flat-head screw drivers. I knocked the spent casing out easily enough but getting the deformed cartridge out of the magazine feed was challenging. I had never taken the Henry apart that far before: a learning experience. I'm still not sure why I didn't get a normal extraction. How does one tell if the extractor is broken off or otherwise not functioning in a Henry lever action?
 

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Discussion Starter #67
There was one outside my bedroom window not further than 18-20 feet away. I thought to myself: that is an incredibly easy shot. So I went to the closet and pulled out the Henry carbine. I leave the empty casing in the chamber as I rule when I've got it in the house. So I worked the lever but it didn't eject. I didn't notice this at first and began to close the action back. This caused the following cartridge to deform. So now I'm totally screwed up. The squirrel obviously got away.

I've got an obstruction in the chamber and a live cartridge lodged in the magazine feed assembly. So I pulled the follower out of the tubular magazine and dumped the remaining cartridges. I went out to the garage and pulled out a .22 cleaning rod and a couple of flat-head screw drivers. I knocked the spent casing out easily enough but getting the deformed cartridge out of the magazine feed was challenging. I had never taken the Henry apart that far before: a learning experience. I'm still not sure why I didn't get a normal extraction. How does one tell if the extractor is broken off or otherwise not functioning in a Henry lever action?
That dude- that nefarious squirrel!- is a genius, man.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Took a chance and went back to the same area as last time in search of Rocky.

Was only there for an hour or so when a bunch of bicyclists showed up and rode all around the trails.

Packed it in, but returned around 4. Stayed until a little after 6.

Saw three squirrels and heard a few more. Unfortunately, each of the three made it into the fully leafed trees before I could get a shot.

No amount of waiting or trickery got them to move. I should have taken the shotgun instead of the scoped .22.

Long story short, the beasties are there. I think they’re just very skittish from the horses and bikes coming through so much this Fall and are hunkering down until early morning or evening.
 

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Took a chance and went back to the same area as last time in search of Rocky.

Was only there for an hour or so when a bunch of bicyclists showed up and rode all around the trails.

Packed it in, but returned around 4. Stayed until a little after 6.

Saw three squirrels and heard a few more. Unfortunately, each of the three made it into the fully leafed trees before I could get a shot.

No amount of waiting or trickery got them to move. I should have taken the shotgun instead of the scoped .22.

Long story short, the beasties are there. I think they’re just very skittish from the horses and bikes coming through so much this Fall and are hunkering down until early morning or evening.
Take a ball of string with you. Tie it to a bush or something and then go to the other side of the tree. Wait about 10 or 15 minutes and start pulling on the string. A lot of times that will bring the squirrel to your side of the tree unless it's a den tree and they have gone into the hole in the tree
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Take a ball of string with you. Tie it to a bush or something and then go to the other side of the tree. Wait about 10 or 15 minutes and start pulling on the string. A lot of times that will bring the squirrel to your side of the tree unless it's a den tree and they have gone into the hole in the tree
Ach! What a great idea! I had a pocket full of rocks to throw for that technique, but that idea is far better.

Thanks, brother.
 

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Took a chance and went back to the same area as last time in search of Rocky.

Was only there for an hour or so when a bunch of bicyclists showed up and rode all around the trails.

Packed it in, but returned around 4. Stayed until a little after 6.

Saw three squirrels and heard a few more. Unfortunately, each of the three made it into the fully leafed trees before I could get a shot.

No amount of waiting or trickery got them to move. I should have taken the shotgun instead of the scoped .22.

Long story short, the beasties are there. I think they’re just very skittish from the horses and bikes coming through so much this Fall and are hunkering down until early morning or evening.
Rocket hunting Rocky. That is funny. :D
 

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I always find a spot where they will move to and set down and let them come to me I have killed six setting in one spot carry A five gal bucket with your drinks and knife paper tiles rubber gloves some ice pack to keep drink and fresh squirrel good till you get home OH the bucket makes a very good place to set
 

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No shooting squirrels at home for me, the city would be upset and I have too many neighbors. The house next door is where our city manager lives.

I was invited to eliminate some problem squirrels by a couple of widows that had bird feeders, two different places out of city limits. Of course, I did my duty and did indeed, solve their problems.

One of those places is now my favorite hunting woods and the folks living there are a couple of my best friends. It is also just minutes from home. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #79
The squirrel skunk is over. Got one this morning. Looking to go back this afternoon once the mountain bikers and dog walkers leave.

Since it's also Fall turkey season, thought to try a different load than the #6- high brass #4 with a mod choke. Did pretty well at 25 yds.

just an observation, but there's a special kind of naivete that seems to be pretty freaking common with city people walking their dogs in a National Forest. Several of these people let their dogs run free during archery season. Some of these dogs are deer colored.

Wouldn't hurt my feelings if they gave the hunters a break and closed the forests to bikes and dogs during hunting season.
 
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