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I don’t own anything from BCA. But I own a lot of stuff from PSA. All the 5.56 stuff works as advertised, and I have no issues with their builds and barrels. But I’ve never put one of their AR-15 barrels on paper before either. No idea what the accuracy is.
I have, however, shot two of their AR-10’s for accuracy. I was pleasantly surprised. They aren’t same-hole accurate with factory ammunition, but they shoot small groups.
I think bullets have improved a lot, and barrel manufacturers are (over all) doing a better job than even 10 years ago. New off the shelf hunting rifles will shoot clover leaf groups. MOA accuracy from a bolt rifle is now bare minimum. Old rifles I have shoot tight little groups with modern bullets too. I suspect this carries over to civilian contract AR parts. Maybe I’m wrong, but it subjectively seems like quality is up even as price is down.
 

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I don’t own anything from BCA. But I own a lot of stuff from PSA. All the 5.56 stuff works as advertised, and I have no issues with their builds and barrels. But I’ve never put one of their AR-15 barrels on paper before either. No idea what the accuracy is.
I have, however, shot two of their AR-10’s for accuracy. I was pleasantly surprised. They aren’t same-hole accurate with factory ammunition, but they shoot small groups.
I think bullets have improved a lot, and barrel manufacturers are (over all) doing a better job than even 10 years ago. New off the shelf hunting rifles will shoot clover leaf groups. MOA accuracy from a bolt rifle is now bare minimum. Old rifles I have shoot tight little groups with modern bullets too. I suspect this carries over to civilian contract AR parts. Maybe I’m wrong, but it subjectively seems like quality is up even as price is down.
Your right, technology and the capability for better production methods ahs increased dramatically over the last say 15 years or so.
 

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Have had a BCA 7.62 x 39 upper for years. Runs the track without stumbling with anything it gets from the mags.

The only issue I've had (and, I was warned, but scoffed), is the gas block moved and made it a single shot carbine until it was fixed. Looked properly staked, but couldn't have been.

Other than that, on any given day, it's my favorite AR.
I have learned from all the uppers I have bought that assembly has a lot to do with how they shoot. So I ether buy them un assembled or I break them down & reassemble them to be sure it's right. I have had complete uppers from places like Thunder Tactical that almost fell apart in my hands.
 

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There is another story on dust covers. Those who say they are not needed for hunting applications have never been with me. I have crawled 400 yards for a shot at an antelope in Oklahoma, I have crawled much farther in Wyoming where I have harvested 25-30 goats, and two B and C mule deer, and I have hiked/climbed up 400 foot cliffs on my knees and belly in Colorado to makes shots on a B and C mule deer, all with a model 7400 Remington. When you get down on your knees or belly with a rifle in your hands or on your back, you are dragging that gun through hundreds of chances to get seeds, and limbs and trash in it.

The Remington model 74, 7400 and all those guns have a plastic dust cover. Like many ARs, especially those cut to 223 chambers instead of 5.56 chambers, there is no extra room in that chamber for dirt or seeds. Hence they have always had a dust cover. Midway even sells a replacement.
Remington Ejector Port Cover Remington 4 7400 (midwayusa.com)

I spent 29 years affiliated with the M16 a later M4 on the job. I do not ever recall using the forward assist, but keeping that dust cover closed just makes sense. Especially on a civilian version cut for 223 with the tighter tolerances. The ARs also need to run wet, that little film of oil will catch dust and tiny seeds. So, for hunting or defense or whatever, I prefer a dust cover. Mine spend too much time away from the truck. If it was just for competition or range shooting, it would not matter to me. FWIW
 

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There is another story on dust covers. Those who say they are not needed for hunting applications have never been with me. I have crawled 400 yards for a shot at an antelope in Oklahoma, I have crawled much farther in Wyoming where I have harvested 25-30 goats, and two B and C mule deer, and I have hiked/climbed up 400 foot cliffs on my knees and belly in Colorado to makes shots on a B and C mule deer, all with a model 7400 Remington. When you get down on your knees or belly with a rifle in your hands or on your back, you are dragging that gun through hundreds of chances to get seeds, and limbs and trash in it.

The Remington model 74, 7400 and all those guns have a plastic dust cover. Like many ARs, especially those cut to 223 chambers instead of 5.56 chambers, there is no extra room in that chamber for dirt or seeds. Hence they have always had a dust cover. Midway even sells a replacement.
Remington Ejector Port Cover Remington 4 7400 (midwayusa.com)

I spent 29 years affiliated with the M16 a later M4 on the job. I do not ever recall using the forward assist, but keeping that dust cover closed just makes sense. Especially on a civilian version cut for 223 with the tighter tolerances. The ARs also need to run wet, that little film of oil will catch dust and tiny seeds. So, for hunting or defense or whatever, I prefer a dust cover. Mine spend too much time away from the truck. If it was just for competition or range shooting, it would not matter to me. FWIW

excellent points!

I feel like the dust cover weighs so little, its hardly a hindrance having it there. nothing wrong with slick side uppers, just dont drag it through the dirt/ mud/ whatever!
 

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Hmm. They selling now upper because of the pandemic,That’s just thinking ahead of the failure curve.
 
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