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I have picked up a 2nd Arisaka rifle after finding the 1st was a ceremonial rifle and could only be used with blanks no live ammo. Good wall hanger, When I got it apart ,I found different numbers stamped on different parts. Was this normal or common ? I would really like to make this one a shooter
 

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as with anything that went through a war, transferred possession between country's, and went through a 19$ take your pick bin/barrel or two, and there not being any ammo for them for like 40 years during it's lifetime having mixed parts is super common.
surviving with all of it's parts and pieces intact is the hard part.
 

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Mismatched numbers are not uncommon with most of the milsurp rifles from around the globe. Many of them were rebuilt multiple times and updated with replacement parts as needed from new supplies or donor rifles. You would for sure want to have the headspace checked and have it inspected by a qualified gunsmith if you have any doubts about whether it's worthy of being safely shot. Some of those Arisaka rifles late in the war were referred to as "last ditch" rifles and were reportedly substandard and perhaps not a good candidate to actually be used.
I'll post a link below for the introduction forum. You might make a post there introducing yourself to the G&G membership.
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https://www.gunandgame.com/forums/introduction.175/
 

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Yes like noted by our members above. These rifles were re arsenaled and over and over. There were a few arsenals that these rifles were made and also repaired at. A rifle would break and sent back and repaired with parts from other scrapped rifles. There is a site I think I have in my favorites that is dedicated to just these rifles and all symbols and arsenal information. Ii have three of these rifles and one still has the Mum intact. All three are type 99. I really never checked to see if they are matching or parts changed.
 

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Yes like noted by our members above. These rifles were re arsenaled and over and over. There were a few arsenals that these rifles were made and also repaired at. A rifle would break and sent back and repaired with parts from other scrapped rifles. There is a site I think I have in my favorites that is dedicated to just these rifles and all symbols and arsenal information. Ii have three of these rifles and one still has the Mum intact. All three are type 99. I really never checked to see if they are matching or parts changed.
You know, the funny thing is that I have had five different Hungarian-made M95 rifles made before WWI, and all of them had matching numbers - though the bolts on them were so stiff they could certainly have benefited from a rework. It is weird how you can have one type of rifle that could have been used in a revolution and two world wars and has come through with all-matching numbers, and then there are certain guns with less storied histories that you rarely find with matched numbers.
 

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You know, the funny thing is that I have had five different Hungarian-made M95 rifles made before WWI, and all of them had matching numbers - though the bolts on them were so stiff they could certainly have benefited from a rework. It is weird how you can have one type of rifle that could have been used in a revolution and two world wars and has come through with all-matching numbers, and then there are certain guns with less storied histories that you rarely find with matched numbers.
PaleHawkDown you mention the M95. So are you describing an Arisaka rifle or the Steyr Carbine M95 rifle?
 

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Yep could be had cheap years back. Recall even Woolworths had a barrel filled with old milsurps for cheap bucks way back. Would sure take a closer look at em today. Wonder if any SS contract 98ks were among them!
 

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Yep could be had cheap years back. Recall even Woolworths had a barrel filled with old milsurps for cheap bucks way back. Would sure take a closer look at em today. Wonder if any SS contract 98ks were among them!
Mauser they had everything in those Barrels when I used to go to Woolworths. It was like at least 5-6 barrels at all times filled. No one was ever back working in that section. You just grabbed a rifle or rifles and walk up to the register and pay. This is what got me into collecting them as I was excited to go in there and inspect them one by one.
 

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Mauser they had everything in those Barrels when I used to go to Woolworths. It was like at least 5-6 barrels at all times filled. No one was ever back working in that section. You just grabbed a rifle or rifles and walk up to the register and pay. This is what got me into collecting them as I was excited to go in there and inspect them one by one.
Ha! for sure. Was saving for that Rem 1100 back then so milsurps were on the back burner. First fired a Type 99 my friend grabbed for $25. Heck I paid a bit more for that Puma Skinner back around 67!! Was thrilled when my father gave me the old 98k he brought back. Promised I would not swap it for that Ruger 10/22 I always haunted him for back in the late 60s!! LOL
 

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PaleHawkDown you mention the M95. So are you describing an Arisaka rifle or the Steyr Carbine M95 rifle?
Sorry, I bounced away from the Arisaka for a second. I have never seen an Austro-Hungarian Type 38 with matching numbers, but I have never seen a Hungarian pre-WWI M95 that did not have matching numbers.

We are looking at two rifles from a similar period of time with two very different outcomes.
 

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Sorry, I bounced away from the Arisaka for a second. I have never seen an Austro-Hungarian Type 38 with matching numbers, but I have never seen a Hungarian pre-WWI M95 that did not have matching numbers.

We are looking at two rifles from a similar period of time with two very different outcomes.
I have two Steyr rifles but never looked at the serial numbers. I have collected for years and clean them and into safe. Never get many of them out again
 

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i have two t-99 japanese 7.7, that have matching number and the screws are staked in(never apart). both are early 1940-1941 made that GI,s brought back from the south pacific. this is one with my japanese army group. i have killed deer with them and they are accurett and safe to shoot with the right reloads.
 

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I have picked up a 2nd Arisaka rifle after finding the 1st was a ceremonial rifle and could only be used with blanks no live ammo. Good wall hanger, When I got it apart ,I found different numbers stamped on different parts. Was this normal or common ? I would really like to make this one a shooter
 

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You can not make a trainer into a shooter it could blow up with live round mostly due to fact blank firing rifle is made up of pot junk slag metal and cant endure the combustion of a live charged round and the barrel is for most part not barreled with rifling lots of people in the 60s and 1970s got hurt bad by doing this
 
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