close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

blemished bullets

Discussion in 'General Reloading' started by rondog, Mar 25, 2012.

  1. rondog

    rondog G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2007
    Messages:
    8,214
    Likes Received:
    861
    So, I started this recent thread about reloading .303 Brit, and mentioned that I was using these blemished bullets that I'd bought from Midway a couple years ago. I bought 'em thinking "bargain bullets, sweet!" Say's they're "blemished", but they're bullets, and FMJ's to boot. How "blemished" can they be? So I bought 500.

    [​IMG]

    What a fool.



    I reckon that when some minimum-wage dipstick at the bullet factory sets the canneluring machine exactly 1/8", yes, .125", off from where it's supposed to be, then those bullets will qualify as "blemished". Bah. Reckon they'll still go down the barrel is a straight line, I hope.

    [​IMG]
     
    #1
  2. Dark1

    Dark1 Suspended

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,055
    Likes Received:
    1
    Not all rounds you use the cantalur as a crimping line I know with the 97gr banners for the 6.8 the bands are way above the case mouth and still shoot sub MOA in my gun so you will be good.
     
    #2
  3. rondog

    rondog G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2007
    Messages:
    8,214
    Likes Received:
    861
    Maybe not, but that's where they should be. That's what the cannelure is for, as far as I know, is for the case mouth to crimp into. I don't know, maybe I'm wrong. Happened once before.
     
    #3
  4. Dressround

    Dressround G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,440
    Likes Received:
    842
    I have never crimped 303s.
    The military ones were always crimped for using in machine guns
    as well as rifles Multi use, never had any problems with the bullet
    being left in the breech when ejected.
    Good cases hold the bullet firmly enough.
     
    #4
  5. 338RUM

    338RUM G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    6,437
    Likes Received:
    989
    Not to be a Smart Donkey... but they are Blemished... Do you have a Lee FCD???
     
    #5
  6. Dark1

    Dark1 Suspended

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,055
    Likes Received:
    1
    No that is not what they are made for I think you should do some research on terminal ballistics. On most modern ammo the main resin for the cannelure is to weaken the jacket at a predetermined point to enhance fragmentation. It just happens to be near the perfect location to also use as a crimping grove on most bullets. It is just that most had loaders mistake this as what length they must lose there ammo to but it is not
     
    #6
  7. DocAitch

    DocAitch G&G Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2008
    Messages:
    946
    Likes Received:
    63
    cannelure

    That is the first time I have heard that explanation of "cannelure" and a quick search gave me 5 references all stating that the cannelure is for crimping.
    What is your reference for the enhanced fragmentation statement?
    DocAitch
     
    #7
  8. 338RUM

    338RUM G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    6,437
    Likes Received:
    989
    Mental instability
     
    #8
  9. rondog

    rondog G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2007
    Messages:
    8,214
    Likes Received:
    861
    Yes, I do. The Lee FCD in this case is merely a 4-sided collet that crimps the mouth of the case, There's no resizing involved in a Lee FCD for rifle calibers. And yes, I'm lightly crimping them with the FCD, you can see that in the photo.

    And I KNOW they're blemished! That's why I bought them! I just never dreamed that the "blemish" would mean that the cannelure was 1/8" off from where it should be. I figured "blemished" meant they had scratches, or minor flaws in the jacket, or dented points....things like that.

    Dude, put down the crack pipe. Seriously.
     
    #9
  10. 338RUM

    338RUM G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    6,437
    Likes Received:
    989
    I use the FCD even on bullets that have no cannuler, the FCD is strong enough to make one. No worries there, you will be fine!

    Future reference blemished can mean ANYTHING!!!! I got some blems that were nosler accubonds with a purple tip... oops... but I then got some Rem core lokt bullets that had jackets mis aligned...
     
    #10
  11. Dressround

    Dressround G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,440
    Likes Received:
    842
    I can get just as many laughs on the general forum as the Humor forum.
    I love the quick quips Keep it up guys.
     
    #11
  12. BaserRonin

    BaserRonin G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    2,453
    Likes Received:
    25
    I would take those screwed up bullets off your hands at a severely reduced price if you like.

    I don't use the cannelure in a fair amount of my loadings anyway.
     
    #12
  13. gandog56

    gandog56 G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Messages:
    31,292
    Likes Received:
    4,220
    I bought some .270 blemmies once. The blemish was they WERE put through a cannelure machine. They weren't supposed to have been,

    Shot outstanding, too!
     
    #13
  14. gandog56

    gandog56 G&G Evangelist

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Messages:
    31,292
    Likes Received:
    4,220
    I neber use the cannelure as the crimping spot. I use the calipers, instead.
     
    #14
  15. Dark1

    Dark1 Suspended

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,055
    Likes Received:
    1
    Look at the DRGKRs reports on T/B and the DOD reports on the search for better FMJ ammo it explains it all.
     
    #15
  16. Dark1

    Dark1 Suspended

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,055
    Likes Received:
    1
    Were they 115gr Custom Competition by any chance I know there was a big over run of them that were made with a cannelure for SSA to be used in the 6.8 as the 115 OTM enhanced fragmentation round for .MIL testing .
     
    #16
  17. Big Dog

    Big Dog Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler Forum Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2002
    Messages:
    26,799
    Likes Received:
    9,857
    I generally use the cannelure to locate the bullet in the case, as long as they allow proper COAL. The 123 gr. bulk bullets I am currently loading for my 7.62X39 are exactly right.
    For .303 Brit I don't crimp - don't see a reason for a bolt action. Most of the bullets I use do have the cannelure but some don't.
    I have bought the 'blems' before, and one batch had no problems I could see - I even compared them directly to the 'good' bullets I had bought before at a higher price. I did not check the weight. Maybe a difference there? But nothing the unaided eye could detect! The price was right and they shot fine.
     
    #17
  18. Dark1

    Dark1 Suspended

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,055
    Likes Received:
    1
    A lot of blems ate also just over run of a special run of ammo like the .277 115 gr that I mentioned above the production 115gr cc do not have a cannelure but SSA custom ordered them with it for there ammo and there was like 500k rounds of over run they needed to sell but couldn't sell them as firsts do them having a cannelure.
     
    #18
  19. deadzero

    deadzero G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,022
    Likes Received:
    520

    Actually, your both right to some degree.
    the cannelure is generally in the right position to use as a crimping groove reference, but not always for a particular loading. one bullet design can be used in mulitple applications at times and some correct OAL measurements may not line up with the crimping groove in all applications.

    the cannelure creates a distortion in the jacket material leading to specific results. it does interfere with bullet expansion if it reaches this point. also before bonding of the core to the jacket the cannelure aided in preventing jacket and core seperation, but only up to a point was it effective. if expansion exceeded the cannelure groove core seperation was almost sure to occur at this point. if a jacket was designed thin enough or designed with weak areas to enhance expansion the cannelure was the last stop before complete, controlled, fragmentation occured.
     
    #19
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
  20. TheWall

    TheWall Firearm Affectionado Forum Contributor

    Joined:
    May 12, 2007
    Messages:
    2,927
    Likes Received:
    1,270
    Very interestink! Learn something new everyday. This kind of information really helps us that are new to reloading. Thanks! [​IMG]
     
    #20
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
Verification:
Draft saved Draft deleted