Gun and Game Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Need help picking out which type And brand to buy. Need one asap. I seen the chamber kind and the one u place in the tip of the barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,237 Posts
I have a Tasco Boresighter and several inserts that fit in the end of the barrel for different calibers that I use for guns I cant see down the bore on.
It works OK .
Most guns I set in the benchrest and look thru the bore at a 1 inch dot at 50 ft away , then adjust the scope cross hairs and put them in the center of the dot...gets me on target so I can fine tune it from there...
 

·
Sir Loin of Beef
Joined
·
16,717 Posts
I have a laser end of barrel thing. It works...somewhat. But nothing like actually eyeballing down the bore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,235 Posts
Need help picking out which type And brand to buy. Need one asap. I seen the chamber kind and the one u place in the tip of the barrel.
Are you talking laser,or the one with the grid?You mention chamber, that sounds like a laser. ,,,sam.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
i do exactly what the first 2 replies said. put it in a stable position/mount, take the bolt out and look down the barrel adjusting the rifle so its on the bulls eye. then just adjust the scope so its also on the bullseye and it should be right on. i did the with my 22lr and it was only an inch off at 50 yards. from there you can easily get it sighted in perfectly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,235 Posts
i do exactly what the first 2 replies said. put it in a stable position/mount, take the bolt out and look down the barrel adjusting the rifle so its on the bulls eye. then just adjust the scope so its also on the bullseye and it should be right on. i did the with my 22lr and it was only an inch off at 50 yards. from there you can easily get it sighted in perfectly.
That is kind of hard to do with AL,s,slides,and levers.That is where lasers are great.In most cases you can set a target at 25yds,sight in dead on and usually come out 1.5" to 3" high at 100yds and close to dead on at 200yds.I don't use much more ammo doing it at 25yds than any other way. (I usually center the crosshairs which is usually turning the adjustment all the way up or down and backing off about 3 1/2 turns. (on both windage and elevation) ,,,sam.
 

·
Sir Loin of Beef
Joined
·
16,717 Posts
Centering the crosshairs is dang good advice! Especially when switching scopes around. Thanks for the reminder Sam!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,827 Posts
i have a BSA and a bushnell that use the arbors both were around 25 bucks and always get me on paper @ 100yds
 

·
Freedom Zealot
Joined
·
33,733 Posts
Sam made a very good point. A lot of shooters never set their crosshairs at mechanical zero. Then they wonder why they run out of windage adjustment during their attempt to zero the scope to POI or POA (both, by the way, work well).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Make it 2 for the Bushnell with arbors (inserts for the barrel) Love mine.
Sight it in at 50' to 25 yds with the boresighter, and then I'm on paper at 50 yds for sure. I use it for 2 lever guns and 2 semi auto's.
One of my favorite gun shops uses the Bushnell magnetic one and they swear by it. Thought it wouldn't work on stainless guns, but most stainless barrels have enough iron (steel) in them to make them magnetic.
Only about $29 at a reasonable guns store--less on line, Wally's or on sale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
some guns dont allow you to sight down the barrel, tex
Haven't seen one yet you couldn't put a dentist's mirror (one of those angled things) in the breech end with the bolt open. Even saw a guy boresight his revolver this way to get the scope on it close.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
A lot of shooters never set their crosshairs at mechanical zero.
Good point.

Most shooters don't know what mechanical zero is. And it's typically not half way between the limits of the adjustments.

A scope's mechanical zero is when the reticule's center is on the axis of the scope tube. Most scopes have more adjustment range from that point to one limit than the other in both elevation and windage. There's usually more clicks from mechanical zero to the direction the adjustment knobs are backed out away from the scope; usually up in elevation and right in windage. That's because the erector tube inside the scope moved by the adjustments stops against the scope tube before the adjustment reaches its outward travel limits.

To put the reticule adjustments at mechanical zero, lay the scope in two solid-mounted V-blocks; one at each end of the tube. One block just behind the objective bell and the other right in front of the zoom ring or eye piece lock ring is good. Look through the scope, rotate (turn, spin?) it then watch the reticule make a circle about some point. Move the adjustments so the reticule stays at one point all the time as the scope is rotated.

Once that's done, the scope's adjustments are set to mechanical zero. The scope's optical and adjustment axes are now aligned at the center of the tube. When the scope's mounted in rings on the rifle you can find out what the misalignment is between the barrel/bore axis to the scope's axis. Just set the rifle up with the scope's reticule aligned on something and see if the bore's aligned with it. Count the clicks on each knob as you adjust the scope to "bore sight" then write them down.

It's interesting to see what the difference is across several rifles. Some folks almost fall out of their socks when they see how much misalignment there is.

Here's a link to an excellent article on this. Print it out for future reference.

http://www.westcoasttactical.com/Common/Articles/Optics/Erector_Centering_Instructions.pdf
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30,645 Posts
good one bart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
some guns dont allow you to boresight through the barrel, tex
Oops....there's some guns you can't use a dental mirror on. I forgot about pistols with locking lugs atop the breech end to lock the barrel "up" from its open-slide position.

M1911's and others of that ilk have the barrel pointed a degree or more (60+ MOA) up from its firing position when their slide's locked back. You'll need a muzzle-mounted collimator or laser do boresight.

Don't forget to adjust handgun sights such that the bore points a ways below where its sights are aimed. A .44 magnum's barrel will be pointed lower from line of sight than a .22 rimfire one when zeroed at normal handgun ranges. With iron sights, the front one's higher above bore axis than the rear one. Handgun barrel axes swing upwards in recoil while the bullet's going down the barrel. Much more so than shoulder-fired rifles which do it a tiny bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,235 Posts
Good point.

Most shooters don't know what mechanical zero is. And it's typically not half way between the limits of the adjustments.

A scope's mechanical zero is when the reticule's center is on the axis of the scope tube. Most scopes have more adjustment range from that point to one limit than the other in both elevation and windage. There's usually more clicks from mechanical zero to the direction the adjustment knobs are backed out away from the scope; usually up in elevation and right in windage. That's because the erector tube inside the scope moved by the adjustments stops against the scope tube before the adjustment reaches its outward travel limits.

To put the reticule adjustments at mechanical zero, lay the scope in two solid-mounted V-blocks; one at each end of the tube. One block just behind the objective bell and the other right in front of the zoom ring or eye piece lock ring is good. Look through the scope, rotate (turn, spin?) it then watch the reticule make a circle about some point. Move the adjustments so the reticule stays at one point all the time as the scope is rotated.

Once that's done, the scope's adjustments are set to mechanical zero. The scope's optical and adjustment axes are now aligned at the center of the tube. When the scope's mounted in rings on the rifle you can find out what the misalignment is between the barrel/bore axis to the scope's axis. Just set the rifle up with the scope's reticule aligned on something and see if the bore's aligned with it. Count the clicks on each knob as you adjust the scope to "bore sight" then write them down.

It's interesting to see what the difference is across several rifles. Some folks almost fall out of their socks when they see how much misalignment there is.

Here's a link to an excellent article on this. Print it out for future reference.

http://www.westcoasttactical.com/Common/Articles/Optics/Erector_Centering_Instructions.pdf
Yeah but it really doesn't malke much difference when I just want to get on paper at 25yds.Just turn it half way between up and down and left and right and it works.This isn't an article or a long drawn out deal to get things perfect.I just want a bullet in a piece of paper so I know where to adjust to.MZ doesn't work the best anyway because when mounted on a gun using imperfect holes in a receiver to bolt imperfect bases on and then fasten imperfect rings to that have an imperfect scope fastened in them leaves MZ very questionable.I think it is great if you want to set up with MZ,whatever melts your butter.But for me,it is about ten times as fast for me to get one bullet on paper at 25yds,meisure,adjust to zero,and then go for 100yds.Of course,I am a simple man that believes in KISS. ,,,sam.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
MZ doesn't work the best anyway because when mounted on a gun using imperfect holes in a receiver to bolt imperfect bases on and then fasten imperfect rings to that have an imperfect scope fastened in them leaves MZ very questionable.
True, but when the scope's at MZ and mounted on a rifle, then boresighted, it shows folks how far it might need to be shimmed in its mounting so maximum adjustment range is available in the field; especially in elevation. Otherwise with the scope sighted in and adjusted for RZ (range zero) at some distance and an extreme adjustment's desired, it may not be attained.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top