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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking for a recipe for some sort of long lasting bread. I know about hardtack but i was thinking along some other line. I have seen a type of bread in movies and read about it in books. It has some sort of long lasting properties. I could be mistaken but it seems to have a hard exterior and most of the times it is leavened. I don't necessarily want to hold true to the image just wondering if there is something like it. I am thinking something with a semi hard shell, something that could take a beating in the backpack and still keep it's form, most that I have seen in movies are large and this isn't necessary. I want to keep it as shelf stable as possible. Ordinary bread made by just anyone has a 2-3 week shelf life due to less preservatives. I do not want to shove a bunch of preservatives or flavorings i want to keep it as close to water, flour, salt... and yeast if i have too, I like flat bread. Plus flat bread is a bit smaller and IMO size matters :). Most of the movies and reading describe it as round but i am not set on shape either. Does anyone know of any recipes like this, I can't seem to find any... If not i guess i will have to perfect a homemade hardtack.
 

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Back in the olden days lot's of folks could'nt get flour or wheat so they made corn bread from the corn they grew.

I have a book somewhere that may have what your looking for in it. If I don't return by tomarrow, I can't find it.

But you can Google it.
 

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God, Guns, Glory
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Indian bread
 

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3 cups flour
1 Tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup warm water


Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl. Add warm water in small amounts and knead dough until soft but not sticky. Adjust flour or water as needed. Cover the bowl and let it stand for about 15 minutes.

Pull off pieces of dough (size of eggs) and roll out into thin rounds. Fry rounds in hot oil until bubbles appear on the dough. Turn over and fry on the other side until golden. Serve hot with honey brushed on top.

Or make them sticky, and in strips and wrap around green stick.
Cook over hot coals.
Or heat/bake by putting them on hot rocks.
 

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Back in the olden days lot's of folks could'nt get flour or wheat so they made corn bread from the corn they grew.

I have a book somewhere that may have what your looking for in it. If I don't return by tomarrow, I can't find it.

But you can Google it.

Olden days??? Every local restaurant in town serves corn bread!! Beans and corn bread is a Southern staple!
 

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The only problem with yeast or leven breads is the yeast, they will spoil faster then an un-leven bread. Now you could bake yeast bread and dry it completely out then vacuum pack it and that should stave off the mold, but i dont know cause i aint tried it. Hardtack and indian fry bread is about the only long lasting breads that i know of mainly cause i make them on a regular basis.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
well so far this is a good thread, i especially like the ezekiel bread and also the bannock and while both of thouse aren't long lasting like i wanted it is simple enough to make(at least the bannock is) and the other is preatty much all you need to survive :)
 

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We have a local receipe for bread that can sit stored for a long time ... the bread does turn out harder than a cookie and most locals use it to dip in their coffee. The Bread can stay stored in a sealed cracker container for month's without spoiling or getting moldy....I'll see if I can get the receipe for that and post it here.
 

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You can make bannock, let it cool, then rap in black plastic. Then vacuum seal it, and it will last for months.
 

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Isn't toasting bread a good way to preserve it? I know I heard that somewhere.
 

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What you really need is good Dwarf Bread.

A kind of bread in Terry Pratchett's Discworld series. Not as suitable for eating as for using as a projectile or melee weapon (makes a great bashing object), dwarf bread is extremely hard. Although it's virtually impossible to eat, dwarf bread is good for nutrition, since members of a group carrying it tend to be able to perform the most amazing feats to avoid actually having to eat it.

Cuisine
Bread is also a significant part of dwarf culture throughout the Disc. Dwarf bread is like hardtack, only more so; its properties are a parody of Middle-earth cram and lembas. It will enable you to survive for days (by making you realize you are surrounded by things that look more edible) and never goes stale, possibly because it was always stale. Its primary use is as a weapon (although it is also used as a kind of currency), and it is made in many different types. These include boomerang biscuits, drop scones (a reference to real drop-scones) and close-combat crumpets. Reportedly the process of "forging" a loaf of dwarf bread includes gravel as part of the recipe, and kitty litter is apparently a preferred seasoning.

The Low King sits on an (apparently) ancient loaf of dwarf bread called the Scone of Stone (a parody of the Stone of Scone).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
lol big shrek... yeah but not really lembas would be uber and would be my choice if it was real... it is not as far as i know, i also don't want something that makes me eat something else, that isn't functional :) it would be great to have that ezekiel bread prepared so that it lasts longer, in fact i may try to get some of that, mill it, and maybe bake it into hard tack :) in fact that should be perfect but i don' tknow when i will have the money to do it.
 

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It just happened to hit me.

Have you considered beer?

Don't laugh.

In ancient times slaves were given crude beer mixtures as sustenance. Beer is packed with carbohydrates and some recipes actually have some protein and vitamins depending on the grains used. Additionally protein and vitamins could be ADDED to any brew, even those commonly purchased in stores.

Yes, the alcohol will dehydrate you, but a home made beer (where home brewing is legal this could be done and stock piled in advance) consisting of less than 1% alcohol would have a net hydration gain, and retain it's nutrients, without spoiling, indefinitely. Any % of alcohol could be diluted to .5% or less to ensure positive hydration gain, and solutions as dilute as .3% will make most any flowing water safe to drink.

So, the final product of a home brew could be something extremely rich in carbohydrate calories, with a fair amount of protein and vitamins, with an alcohol level as high as 10%, which would be intended to be added to drinking water as a sanitizer and dietary supplement. This 'nutritious' home brew could be stored in any old plastic container for transportation.

I don't drink, but now I'm considering home brewing and wine making for survival, LOL!
 

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I don't drink either but looked into home brewing years back but could not find a way to brew beer and get the alcohol level down to .05-1 . If you know how (without just watering it down by adding water I'd love to know).

Federal law allows you to make a certain amount of beer/wine/booze for personal consumption per year.
 

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You guys are still thinking inside the box.

With the incredible number of Central American residents that have flooded into the USA, no-one here has heard of tortillas?

Corn or wheat, they're easy to make, easy to eat.


Famous Flour Tortillas

6 cups all purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup vegetable shortening
2 1/2 cups warm water

Mix all the dry ingredients in a bowl.
Blend in the shortening.
Add the water while mixing the dough with a mixer.

Place dough on floured surface.
Divide dough into 16 equal portions.
Cover and let stand 20 minutes.
Roll each ball into an 8" round with a rolling pin.
Cook on a griddle until light brown spots appear.
 

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I don't drink either but looked into home brewing years back but could not find a way to brew beer and get the alcohol level down to .05-1 . If you know how (without just watering it down by adding water I'd love to know).

Federal law allows you to make a certain amount of beer/wine/booze for personal consumption per year.

Heating it above 150 degrees F will cause the alcohol to evaporate out of it, if you do so without a lid or cover on the pot.
 
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