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Discussion Starter #1
I’m building a survival kit . The idea behind it is it’s a back up to the gear I already have . Something I keep on me all the time. In case of SHTF . I’m heading to my BOL I set up camp something happens and I get pushed out of my camp . Just lucky enough to escape with what I’m wearing and my rifle my pack and everything get left behind.
So far what I have for the kit is
1. Aquamira frontier pro water filter
2. Water tabs
3. Storm matches
4. Large ferro rod 6inch x .5inch
5. 4 small game snares(the real cable snares)
6. 1-2 fishing yo- yo’s and a speed hook
7. Flashlight/headlamp
8. Hand cuff key(never know)
If any of you have any more items or ideas let me know. I also am thinking of putting all the components to the kit in some type of molle pouch . Instead of a tin so any thoughts on that would also be helpful


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Great thinking 46Camper. I need to work on this myself. I feel like I carry much more and my pockets will give out. I always have a knife, flashlight and gun on my body. Some things I don't that I should have (in my opinion):
1. lighter/ferro rod
2. paracord (fishing line, snares, firestarter, rope) Thousands of uses.
3. I would like to carry some kind of 'container' for fluids, preferably one that I could cook/boil with
4. hooks and sinkers
5. extra ammo
6. ...and something to carry my stuff in that was comfortable, compact, kept close to the body....concealable...could be worn in the summer and not create a sweat pocket.

Camper - paracord would take the place of 3-4 things on your list
 

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Getting myself ready for 2020 Zombie Apocalypse :D
 
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Discussion Starter #4
The more I think about as far as keeping it on me maybe a Molle vest . Just set it up like a pilot survival vest . ?
No I’m not getting ready for the zombies . Just want a back up in case plan A fails and I have to leave home. Then if plan B bugging out has some problems some I get separated from my backpack weather it be because of someone coming in my camp stealing my gear while I’m gathering wood or food etc. I have some decent gear on me plus my rifle and sidearm.


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I’m building a survival kit . The idea behind it is it’s a back up to the gear I already have . Something I keep on me all the time. In case of SHTF . I’m heading to my BOL I set up camp something happens and I get pushed out of my camp . Just lucky enough to escape with what I’m wearing and my rifle my pack and everything get left behind.
So far what I have for the kit is
1. Aquamira frontier pro water filter
2. Water tabs
3. Storm matches
4. Large ferro rod 6inch x .5inch
5. 4 small game snares(the real cable snares)
6. 1-2 fishing yo- yo’s and a speed hook
7. Flashlight/headlamp
8. Hand cuff key(never know)
If any of you have any more items or ideas let me know. I also am thinking of putting all the components to the kit in some type of molle pouch . Instead of a tin so any thoughts on that would also be helpful...
I would make #6 Multiple fish hooks, and extra line.

Then add what ncnascarlady said.
 

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I'm not worried about bug out stuff. I'm putting every thing I have in to hanging on to exactly what I got and staying exactly where I am. I've put my whole life in to this and no one is going to take it very easily.

If they can get it, then the whole world is agin me and all I need is one pistol, one rifle and one shotgun and all the ammunition I can carry.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I agree it probably won’t ever go that far. If dose most likely I’m going to end up dead. That all depends. I have my son to think about. He is a adult . He isnt like he is not much into the outdoors /survival or even hunting and fishing . I may have to leave just to help him and get him to the BOL .
The land I live on is my wife’s parents.
If it is some how taken over I have a plan for that.
I just want to be ready for the worst


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46camper, I have three articles I have written on the subject of building your own personal emergency kit. They are much too long to post here, but if you PM me your email address I will send them to you. They have information that might be useful to you.
 

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Just my two cents, but I think a lot of people overlook adding soft body armor to their bug out bag. Level IIIA will stop a 44, and a plate the size of a backpack (10x14") only weighs in about a pound, and 1/2" thick. They can be found from $70 and up, depending on brand and size.
 
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The canteen kit is missing the aluminum stove, bic lighter, and a box cutter, but shows compass, thermometer, whistle, emergency blanket, 300lb fishing line, duct tape, wound ointment (in the chapstick tube), iodine drops (wounds and water) cup, and nalgene canteen.

The bracelet isn't as pretty as the store bought ones but has ferro rod, whistle, compass, and a tiny fishing kit in the buckle. The core of the wrap has some 50 lb fishing line 10 lb line, 2 panfish hooks, and some duct tape.

These things and at least a tiny flashlight and a extra large red bandana go with me any time I leave pavement. I always wear my g41 with tlr1 800 lumen and I am never more than a short sprint from a trauma kit. I have some pics of ny wearable trauma kit here somewhere. . .
 

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Lots of thoughtful lists out there. Many put 40 pounds into a rather big pack. I have a secondary pack that stay in each vehicle.To me there are a few absolute essentials for the smaller pack.

First addition. You always want cash, lots of it. ATMs may not work and credit cards may or may not be accepted. Cash works, I carry $2,000 at all times including $20-$30 in coins in each vehicle, for vending machines.

You might think about fanny packs or sling packs, I have both or even the smaller backpacks which you can keep on 24/7.

Then there are simple things that save time/space. For example, I carry small fire starter, but it is EZ to just duct tape a small Bic lighter to them. Fire starters do not work worth a krap after a 1 inch rain.

Then the tiny ponchos, they cost $1 dollar, get 2 of them, if you ever have a downpour you put one on normally and one for your legs. The also work to catch rainwater or as a ground cloth.

People talk about a few fish hooks. I call BS, a dozen #6 will catch large and small fish. You do not have to spend all day waiting on a fish. Hang several on limbs. Use 30-50 lb line, it has other uses.

Multi tool. The small original Leatherman or similar works well.

22 pistol. To me, no survival pack is complete without a small 22 pistol or revolver. Reason are many signalling, low noise harvesting of frogs, fish, rabbits, squirrels, deterrence. 100 rounds of ammo takes little space. Save your handgun and rifle ammo for defense needs. Mine is suppressed.

Every emergency pack needs some calories in it. Could be a can of spam or other food as long as it is in a can so mice cannot get into it, they will eat through your pack for granola bars, ask me how I know. A couple cans of fruit also have the juice/water and should have the pull tab.

Meds are always an issue. Even a few Ibuprofen would ease the fun of sleeping on the ground. If you have access to antibiotics like you can get from CalVet Supply, just a few can save you from food poisoning or other bacterial infection.

A few shop towels, I use them when I potty, they have many uses.

This list is below 5 pounds and fits in a tiny pack or small section of a back pack. If it is winter this stuff will all fit into your jacket, in summer it all fits into a vest.

Of course you have to carry your CCW, long gun, jacket hats, and phones, radios, and ammo, etc., just my additions.
 

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1 kilogram PSK (personal survival kit) to supplement your "Level A" gear stuffed in BDU trousers and coat pockets.

Level B – “Kilo Kit” - I've made changes to my kit since the accompanying pictures were taken. Use this list as an "idea starter" to customize your own kit suitable for your AO and mission.

MyPSK-1Kg.jpg NewPSK.jpg FresnelLens.jpg CableTieBIC.jpg FenixEO1withSpareAAAbatts.jpg

Fenix E01 LED light
Battery caddy - 4AAA
P38 Can Opener
Frontier Filter-Pro version survival straw (added recently, not in photo)
Water bag (gallon ZipLok)
Betadyne
10 metres soft iron snare wire
2 pack Military SpeedHook (not in photo)
Lifeboat whistle
Laminated glass Signal Mirror
SERE Compass
Guardian Safety Blinker Light
tea candles (2)
3 birthday gag candles (pyrotechnic kind which don't blow out)
BIC lighter (cable tie under tab to prevent accidental release of butane)
Doan Fire Tool+striker
Lifeboat Matches
Tinder pack
Fresnel lens (in red Best Glide sleeve)
Leatherman Squirt
Victorinox Recruit
Pocket sharpening steel
Derma Safe Knife
Derma Safe Saw
Photon X-Light
Best Glide Wound Pack1
Best Glide Med Pack1
Pill fob with 3-day supply of personal meds
Quik Clot Sport25
Triangular bandage
2 brass blacked bandolier pins
6 assorted cable ties (added recently, not in photo)
20 ft.550# paracord
survival kit pouch
snap link to attach pouch to gear

I am fairly satisfied with this, especially its compact size and weight, but it every time I have actually had to use it, I discover tweaks to be made! Biggest change was substituting a 1 oz. plastic first aid kit BOTTLE of betadyne, for multiple foil ampules and swabs. Doing so saved enough space to include a Frontier filter straw! But because the filter straw is not adequate to remove all biologicals, chemical treatment remains necessary, so betadyne doubles for water purification as well as wound cleansing.
 

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“Snivel Gear “ - A thought starter

Heat: Stove of some description. Natick cooker, Esbit, Primus, Svea, Trangia, personal preference/ specifics of your scenario/size weight.

Air activated heat packs (12) (back of neck, pits, kidneys, groin x (2)) (In my experience, they need to be kept fresh. Don't know if they have an expiration date on them, but my older stock, doesn't seem to get as hot as fast or stay hot as long, as new stock.)

Cooking: canteen cup for pot, water tea, coffee...whatever your favorite makes water taste good additive/addiction, aiding hydration, internal heat, perhaps calories, minerals, protein/fat.

Food - Favorite quick energy, candy, food bars. perhaps freeze dried and/or stripped MREs. Protein good, fat also important in cold, longer lasting/slower burning calories.

Hydration: (2) qts. water, flexible bottles with pouches (slows freezing, aids attachment to ruck/belt, protects skin from freezing to cold metal, "hot water bottle" in sleeping bag)/hydration system, pot, stove/fire to heat water/melt snow/ice. Additional reliable long term method of purification, Frontier Pro Plus filter and (bleach/betadyne.

Pack: Planning standard not to exceed 10kg as constant in an EDC field ruck or Get Home Bag. Serves as Contingency kit in field scenarios, also works in urban contingency scenarios. If I had to walk home from work, if I couldn't make it in one day, if I was curtailed or was being pursued/hunted, if I was sick/injured, I've got shelter, insulation, heat, hydration, and calories in my ruck, that may sustain me for 7 days. Wiggys is the only company, that states that you can store their gear compressed indefinitely, and not lose loft, so that it will keep you warm if either you or the bag or both is soaked.

I called them, asking about the smallest compressed 20 degree mummy bag, and Mr. Wiggy would recommend a warmer bag for winter. If I'm purposely going out in winter, I'll take a winter bag. If I can get to my car kit, I'm good. A 20 degree bag in my ruck, is more warmth then I would have without it (If his 0 degree bag packed as small as his 20 degree, or my pack was bigger, or I was willing to carry a bigger pack and the extra weight, I'd carry it. Looking for "patrol bag" size packed, with Wiggys performance and much warmer) Bigger pack gives room for full sized pad, tent... Add fully layered, puffy jacket and pants, bivi bag (or ruck itself as shelter to save your toes/feet), cut down pad and tarp...?

Pack - Camelbak Striker - contents:

-Sportsmans Blanket
-Canteen Cup in a Canteen Pouch stuffed with tea bags, instant coffee, dry soup packets and 2 Metrx bars
-Lg. contractor trash bag
-10 metres 550# paracord
-Gossman Green River pattern knife
-Fire Kit (Bic, Ferro, Matches, VSCB's, BBQ fire starters cut up into 1" pieces and bicycle inner tube
-1 Litre stainless water bottle and cover
-Petzl head lamp & spare batteries
-Surefire E2 Outdoorsman and spare batteries
-Chemical hand warmers (lg. size)
-Spare wool watch cap
-Spare leather palm Nomex flier's gloves
-Filson wool Vest
-CountyComm Grab & Go First Aid Kit
-Gerber Folding Saw
-CountyComm zipper case with 24 rounds extra ammo for my EDC handgun

Pocket Gear
-Bucklite folder
-Chapstick
-Rope Cuffs
-Bic Lighter
-Ferro and Skoal can full of VSCB
-Compass & Map
-Bandana
-another 10m of 550 Cord
-Cell phone

On Belt
-Enzo Trapper Knife
-Belt Kit(AMK Heat Sheet, Survival Straw, Signal Mirror, Whistle, Ferro, Sm. Bic, VSCB, SAK Farmer, Decoy line, Sm. Fishing kit, Snare wire, Small light, button compass)
-Leatherman Wave
 

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EDC for An Unexpected Overnight

Most body recoveries on searches involve exposure victims. Always wear adequate clothing for the expected weather. Have a windproof outer layer and warm when wet insulating layer which can be wrung out, shaken out and put back on, if you get soaked is vital. You hiking kit should always have an extra warming layer, rain gear or poncho, hat, gloves and extra dry socks in waterproof Alosak bag. The above are life- saving in terms of conserving body heat and keeping the hands working to make fire.

Also having adequate, well proven basic tools with you, and which you have developed skill in using and confidence in from daily use is vital. You want

“Bomb proof” fire starting kit which can be executed with cold hands.

A headlamp which burns a minimum of 12 hours on one set of batteries and gives hands-free lighting to walk out of the woods or tend the fire.

Basic signalling, whistle, LED blinker, signal mirror, VS17 panel and Space Blanket

http://preparednessadvice.com/survival/space-blankets-good-bad/#.VpvZK5orLcs

Clothing is your first, and perhaps only line of shelter, so choose accordingly if you must survive out of your pockets (survive = breathing, not necessarily comfort).

Fire comes first if not carrying a pre-made shelter (USGI poncho and poncho liner, something!), or lacking the foresight/ability/resources (including tools) necessary to create/locate a "Functional" shelter. The ability to get under something, while trying to start a fire gets you out of the prevailing conditions.

I'm thinking ferro rod and striker, waterproof matches, BICs, PJCB's, road flare, etc., here (it's NOT "cheating" if you live), NOT flint and steel and bow drills! Having the most viable fire starting options available should your attempts at the primitive fail. I know how to use flint and steel etc. too, but I'm not capable enough, that I'd want to stake my life on it, even on a "blue bird clear" day.

The Adventure Medical bivy sack, stuffed with natural insulation, such as pine needle thatch (best), dry grass, or leaves, is much more effective than the bivy used alone. Best use of the Space Blanket is as a rain, wind and snow resistant cover for the USGI poncho liner. I often carry the bivy sack, a GI poncho and two poncho liners, and have slept outdoors in mild, wet snow conditions in relative comfort. I can vouch for the effectiveness of the Adventure Medical bivvy sack when combined with a Navy wool watch cap over your head, wool mittens, a GI poncho liner wrapped around you inside the bivvy sack and using an extra, grommeted, fabric backed Space Blanket as a fire reflector behind you, with USGI poncho rigged as windbreak and overhead cover.

Not my favorite overnight in the woods during a wet snowstorm, but far better than it would have been without it. In a cold-wet environment a down sleeping bag would have lost its loft and failed, but the above outfit I carry in my ruck serves well if you can manage even a small fire.

Many people still rely on down, but I was on a week long trip, that I kept my down bag dry from external wet both in use and carrying, and just from my own body moisture loss, was really losing efficiency. A functional vapor barrier is absolutely necessary if you want to use down for more than a weekend. I learned my lesson and gave away all my down.
 

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7-day Emergency Ration Box – No "Cooking" Required - Boil Water Only,

Minimum dependence on specialized "survival" or backpacking foods*
By using "common grocery items" to the maximum extent possible.

Planning objective is a "box" which stores well and which provides a week's worth of emergency food, requiring minimal preparation, as a short-term measure to stow in the man-overboard or bailout bag of a boat, off-road vehicle or private aircraft. Easy to obtain the contents, pack, store and use. Anything you might forage, glean, hunt, fish or trap should supplement this, because the calorie content provided is inadequate for heavy exertion or prolonged exposure to sub-freezing weather.

Fat is required to perform numerous bodily functions, and many so-called emergency rations are deficient in this category. In a temperate climate with light exertion based on 2,000 calories/day you want not less than 400 fat calories daily. In below freezing weather with moderate exertion strive for not less than 800 fat calories daily and an absolute minimum of 2500 calories/day. Below zero temps 1000 fat calories daily and 3000 calories.

1 kg., 5 pkgs. Stockan’s Thick Orkney Oakcakes 25g slice 120 cals/200g pkg., 5 slices/day—600 cals.
Or substitute:
WASA whole grain crispbread 18 slices/pkg. x4 pkgs. 60cals./slice, 10 slices/day----------600 cals.
Peter Pan Natural Peanut Butter, two pounds , 14 servings/lb., 4/day @ 210cals. Ea.----- 840 cals, Below freezing add another pound!
McCutcheons Grape Jelly, 30 servings / lb. @ 1 tbsp. 18g, 50 cals. 4/day------------------- 200 cals.
Red Feather butter 1 tin, 12 ozs., 24 servings/tin @ 100 cals 3/day------------------------- 300 cals.* , Below freezing pack TWO tins.
Bega Cheese 1 tin, about 6 servings /tin @ 100 cals. Ea. 1 serving/day---------------------100 cals., * Below freezing pack TWO tins.
Sugar cubes, 12 cals./cube (4 cals./gram) @ 150 cubes/lb., 20 cubes/day------------------ 240 cals. Below freezing double quantity.
Instant Coffee sachets or tea bags box 40 ct. 4/day +/- ---------------------------------------- 0 cals, Below freezing double quantity.
Knorr Bouillon cubes 3/day, 24 ct. per bx., @15 cals each--------------------------------------45 cals. Below freezing double quantity.
Evaporated milk eight 4 oz. tins @ 1/tin/day for tea/coffee, 4 servings @ 40 cals. /oz.----160 cals, below freezing double quantity
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Approximate daily caloric intake from emergency rations----------------------------------2485 cals./day - temperate conditions without extra allowances

Vitamin supplements are also packed, but not included in caloric total.

If allergic to peanut butter, substitute coconut oil and/or double or triple the butter and cheese rations listed. One tablespoon of coconut oil has about 13.5 grams of total fat. Each gram of fat has 9 calories, you’ll get about 120 calories from a tablespoon of coconut oil. Experiment with your body tolerance to coconut oil. In some people more than 3 tablespoons/day may cause digestive distress.
 
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