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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have an old family heirloom and have always wanted to get it functional again / have it checked by someone who knows what the hell they are doing. It seems from reading online ammo would have to be customized. 7.62 or 4.10 shell. It's marked 44 cal and Belgium.

Can anyone tell me if there is a specialist for this type of revolver?

Thank you for looking

It's identical to this one that sold;
 

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Jsoobs: Sir; some history. and a caution.

And the status gained from wearing a revolver was lost in many parts of America. The revolvers ended up being given away or sold. If you look for them, you can find Montenegrin revolvers at gun shows and online. They are interesting collectibles, but don’t plan on taking them to the range


Montenegro is a small mountainous country of less than a half million people. It has a tumultuous history of wars and revolutions. The nation was independent from 1868 to 1920, when it was absorbed into Yugoslavia. When Yugoslavia broke up in a bloody civil war in the 1990s, Montenegro once again opted for self-rule. It is also the only nation that ever had its name become synonymous for a type of firearm. I speak today of the Montenegrin revolver.
What is a Montenegrin revolver? Basically it is a large-frame double action revolver chambered for the 11.25x36mm cartridge. These guns were made in Austria, Belgium and Spain. Oddly, none were made in Montenegro. The reason they became associated with Montenegro is that the king of that country ordered his citizens to own these revolvers. I think this is the only case in history where a national leader ordered the general population to arm themselves with a specific firearm
 

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information: Sir; my research ??? Dead in.
Probability! Possibilit!y! a gunsmith should be able to repair


LOT 32
Montenegrin Gasser DA revolver, 11mm cal., 5-
1/2” barrel, #120. Revolver remains in overall fair
condition showing an even brown patina over
metal parts of gun, action functioning but trigger
return spring is broken, dark bore, bone grips, lanyard ring, metal piece attached to barrel with old masking tape. From the Stembridge Arms invento- ry with tag noting “Stewart Granger or James Mason-Montenegrin Gasser 11mm ‘Prisoner of Zenda’”. A great prop attributed to an early classic Hollywood movie. Est.: $1,500-$3,000.
LOT 33
DWM Luger semi-auto pistol, barrel sleeved
 

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A lot of the ones you see for sale at places like Gunbroker were bought cheap, because they were broken, and fixed by the person listing them. I know a couple of these guys locally, but they aren't licensed gunsmiths, so they do not work on others' guns. You might be able to find someone local like that by looking at listings near you.
 

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If you can ascertain the year your revolver was made and it is pre-1898 you can ship it to a non-licensed individual, just the same as you can ship a pre-98 to them if they are buying it. Be careful and know who you are shipping it to. Do your homework and make phone calls...if it is after 1898 you will have to ship it to a licensed FFL.
 

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good luck finding a gunsmith that can work on anything but Glocks & AR 15s now days. and if you are lucky enough to find one, finding one that isn't jammed up with years worth of work is even rarer.
 

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good luck finding a gunsmith that can work on anything but Glocks & AR 15s now days. and if you are lucky enough to find one, finding one that isn't jammed up with years worth of work is even rarer.
Yeah. When we decided to open up a gun store, my dad and I both signed up for a gunsmithing certification course. That was pretty much the entire two-year course; Glocks and ARs.

I bailed after the first year when I saw the course syllabus for the second year. The final project for the second year was to build an AR or a Glock from a parts kit.

Dad got his certification, but never got his license because he felt like he learned nothing in the class.

When he "graduated" they gave him the syllabus for the next two years if he wanted to continue on.

If I remember right, there was gun disassembly, reassembly and maintenance - you know, something most of us learned as kids. There was stock refinishing and cold bluing - two things you can learn the basics of from reading the side of the bottles the products come in, and master on your own with practice. There was what I would call basic parts-changing. There was nothing I would even consider proper smithing until the last semester of the fourth year.

You could spend one random hour a week with an old-school gunsmith and get 10 times the valuable lessons the four-year course had to offer. Heck, if you collected old surplus, you could learn more from taking apart the guns, cleaning cosmoline out of every nook and cranny, and reassembling the guns than you would ever learn from the two-year course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks guys. I did find collectorsfirearms.com they said they would work on it but didn't say anything about cost etc. and mentioned they didn't know about ammo. I will have to talk to them on the phone. Not sure if they are well known?

I was directed to an article here about a guy who made some ammo for it. I have also seen where someone cut down .410 shell. I guess the trick would be finding someone local who can do this. The revolver itself was lacquered closed (I believe why it won't break open) but seemingly is in great shape, rifling inside the barrel looks great. It is missing a simple looking metal clip / piece on one side which looks to help keep the break action from opening. Should I add some photos?
 
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