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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everybody,

Someone gave me this rifle long ago and i have no info at all about it.
I can not find any makers marks, stamps or dates.

Im looking for any info somebody might have, just out of interest.

As you can see, somebody snapped the hammer off and tried "soldering" it back on.
It's a shame this happend, but it is still an interesting piece of history.

Thank you in advance for any info you can give me!

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Looks very similar to the German immigrant made "Pennsylvania rifles" And shot guns. That show up time to time, around here. In the early to mid 1800's their were a lot of blacksmiths in the PAST area,
who were trying their luck at barrel making and gun making.
@Cyrano is our resident antique expert. He could probably tell you right away, at least it's basic origins. He should reply sooner or later, now that I tagged him.
 

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There appears to be a maker mark engraved on the plate, but I cannot make it out. Do you have a better picture or an idea of what it says. A white crayon can help bring out detail.
 

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It's not new, that's for sure. What I am wondering is if it's an old flintlock fowling piece that was converted to caplock at some point around 1830 to 1840.
 

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Thing that throws me is it has the french-german artwork. Typical of the Pennsylvanian, "Kentucky Fowler", that you see a lot of in the Ohio River area. But it has that hex barrel tapered down to round, like in the British and New England Area type? Of course there were quite a few eastern barrel makers at that time that sold barrels to other gunsmiths.
Definitely has a makers mark. Looks to say NECIE. That is a common Eastern US, English name. If you could get someone to recognize it , you would have a lot of answers.

It would have a very interesting life story to tell, if it could talk.

My experience is limited to what I have laid eyes on, and learned of locally. So do not take my comments as gospel, just trying to open up a few paths for consideration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for commenting, surely very interesting.

I am at work while typing this, i will try to find some white crayon or something to get a better picture of the engravings without damaging it even further.

Keep in mind i live in the Netherlands, so German or French seems very likely.

Thanks again for your info, if only it could talk...

I'll be back with you this afternoon.
 

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That's what was throwing me I was thinking you were in the Americas, did not catch the Netherlands flag.
Still it is just amazing, the similarities to early long guns here in the USA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hello all,

I tried rubbing it with some different crayons and chalk. Both did not work, the colour didn't stick because the grooves in the engraving are to small and allmost faded out.
After this i tried rubbing it with a pencil and paper, also no use. Worked on the artwork, not on the possible makers mark.

My girlfriend owns a better camera, so i tried making some upclose pictures and some different lighting.
This came out.
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Zooming in and changing the contrast a little, it looks like this.

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It appears to be a Belgian pattern lock, with those distinctive long tails they favored, and if those last letters are CIE, that would pretty much confirm it.
That said, I can't find a Belgian maker whose company name would fit in that space.
 

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Here's a thought. In French, "CIE" is the abbreviation for "Compagnie," the way English uses Co. for "Company." Does anyone know of a Belgian or French gunmaker whose initials are N.E.?
 
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