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Hey all,
Ok, I know this isn't quite a concealed carry question...but it sort of fits. I'm starting to look around for a good long gun to keep in the trunk. I'm thinking along the lines of either a rem. 870 or moss. 500 12 ga. The other consideration is a 5.56 or 7.62 carbine of some variation. What do you all think? Any other suggestions?
 

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YOU TALKIN' TO ME!?
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I'd go with a Mossy 500A with the pistol grip installed (no buttstock)
 

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Sir Loin of Beef
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If you want it for defense then I would vote for a good short barreled pump 12g with a long magazine I would also keep the stock intact.

If you want a self defense trunk gun that will also double as a game rifle of opportunity then a Mini 14 mini 30 or even an AR would do very well. Just depends on what you want to do and how much you want to spend.

12g with a rifled barrel can be a good short range game opportunity weapon and excellent self defense weapon as well. All this versatility for less than $300 in most places. Plus, carry a spare barrel and if you see a covey of quail on your way to check the livestock you won't have to run back to the house!
 

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I agree about the Mossberg 500. There is a version of it made for marine use that comes with ghost ring sights and a conventional stock and a 18 1/2 inch cylinder bore barrel that would do very well as a general purpose car gun. I don't know what the finish is; it's sort of like stainless steel parkerizing and meant to resist salt air. While I think if you must toss it into the trunk it ought to be kept in a hard case with a shell carrier on the stock for safety reasons and to keep it from getting beaten up, I don't think you could do better for an emergency car gun.
 

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Have you considered . . . .

Have you checked out the law enforcement page on the Remington website? Particularly the 870 with the civilian legal barrel length.
 

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if you find that you need heat, it more than likely would be up close and personal. i would go with the shotgun. (but i live in canada, where guns are evil and unncecesary)
 

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HERE YOU GO!

:rocketwhore::lmao:

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iF-WyRULNlI]YouTube - 50 cal Suburban[/ame]
 

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I have kept an old 12 ga. 870 in my vehicles for years. It is tube-loaded with 00 Buck and wrapped up tight in a surplus wool blanket. I have never needed it.

NRAJOE, I can't agree on your idea of a pistol grip shotgun. I hate 'em. Full-stock is the way I would go, 2b41.
 

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For the longest time I carried a Short barreled 12g with a stock in my car and a Ruger 10/22 in my jeep, along with whatever carry gun I had that day. Now that my gun collection has changed I'd like to go with a M44 in the jeep, as well as a .45 pistol of some sort, and a shotgun in the car as well as a small framed 9mm
 

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You might want to consider a Hi-Point carbine

A car gun by definition has to be able to take a fair amount of abuse and still function when you need it. Taking that into account, you might want to think abou making your car gun a Hi-Point carbine in either 9mm or .40 S&W. (Hi-Point says that they will be turning out their carbin in .45 ACP this year. On the other hand, they've been saying that for the past two years and it hasn't gotten production time yet! The reason? The 9mm (Model 995) and the .40 (Model 4095) caliber versions are so popular, Hi-Point can't keep up with the orders.)

Yes, they look a little strange. I've heard people refer to them as "Planet of the Apes guns" and "that ugly little thing." Personally, I think the Hi-Point carbine looks like the result of a one night stand between a Kel-Tec folding carbine and a Thompson submachine gun. But they have virtues as well.

First, they are built tough. They are meant to withstand abuse. They will digest any brand of ammo with no troubles. They are a pleasure to shoot and very accurate within their range - just remember they're pistol-caliber carbines, not battle rifles or target rifles.

Second, you won't need to give up a car payment to buy one. The 995s go for right around $200 new OTD in many places. If you're running in luck you can find them for up to a third less than that. The 4095s might run you $30 more. And the same magazines that fit Hi-Point pistols also fit the carbines of the same caliber.

Third, they are easy to accessorize. One thing I recommend for both models is the clamp-on compensator. It really reduces muzzle blast and tames the recoil down to almost nothing. Most people I know have put red dot sights on them and say that makes them even easier to shoot. If you absolutely can't stand the issue stock, there is an aftermarket stock available that will turn the 'ugly' Model 995 into a visual clone of the Beretta Storm (which, by the way, the Hi-Point decisively outshot when Gun Tests tested and evaluated both carbines). Unfortunately as yet no one has done a similar emulation for the .40 caliber version.

Fourth, they stand behind their products 100% even if you are not the original buyer. I have yet to hear anyone complain about the service Hi-Point gives to Hi-Point owners whos firearms have problems. Even in the integrity-conscious firearms & firearms-related manufacturing community, they stand above the rest.

Finally, as noted the Gun Tests crowd thinks they are superior to the other pistol-caliber carbines being made today. They gave the 4095 the "Our Pick" rating, an accolade very seldom awarded by their testers. As the magazine takes no advertising from anybody, they can afford to be as brutally honest as Consumer Reports. If they like a weapon that much, you know it has to be very good indeed.

So if you are looking for a good car gun, in addition to a 12 gauge pump action shotgun or something like an SKS, do consider Hi-Point's offerings in the pistol-caliber range.
 

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Could always go with a Saiga 12 or 20 gauge and convert it to a side folder. That way you have it compact when you need it.
I guess you could always go with a side folder or six position on a standard shotgun also.
 

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Might I suggest the Taurus Judge. With it, you get the best of both worlds, .45 long colt and .410 shotshell.

G-Meister
 

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as well as a .45 pistol of some sort
Dont mean to hijack, but whats the law for having a pistol in a car?
Do you have to have a concealed weapons permit?
Some people say you can have the gun in the glove compartment, but the magazine has to be in the trunk.
What goods that gonna do?
 

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Check out the Maverick security shotguns made by Mossberg. About the only difference in the Maverick and flag ship 500's is the safty location and it's in a great place.
It's in front of the trigger....very handy ! You can buy a Maverick for less than $199.00 with 20" barrel and extended magazine tube...A.H
 

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jamesw,

Check your local and state laws.

In Missouri where I used to live you could have whatever the hell you wanted in your car. But out here in Oregon where I am now, you have to have your Concealed Carry to have a weapon within easy access while driving.
 

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In my truck theres a cz 82 in the consoe and a folding stock sks with a 20 rd. Tapco mag (the only reliable one I've found) and extra ammo under the back seat
 

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Dont mean to hijack, but whats the law for having a pistol in a car?
Do you have to have a concealed weapons permit?
Some people say you can have the gun in the glove compartment, but the magazine has to be in the trunk.
What goods that gonna do?
Stitchclimber is correct. In most places the gendarmes won't give you a hard time for a long gun, especially if it is unloaded. But everywhere they will hassle you if you have a pistol, CCW or not, loaded or not, where you can reach it while in the driver's seat. I believe they'd actually give you less grief for a pistol on your person with a CCW than they would for one in the cockpit not on your person. It's not rational, but that does seem to be the way it is.

Would some of the law enforcement professionals on the forum care to comment on this issue?
 

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I have a car/gun question and also don't mean to hijack the thread so please forgive but I really need to know. I am in the state of TN.

I took the Gun safety class and applied for my CC permit and am now waiting on it. In the class I learned that we are responsible for our guns and where the bullets go etc. and that is fair enough but concerning leaving them in a car, what happens if someone steals my car while I am in a place that doesn't allow a handgun inside.

For instance, I will be traveling to another state soon for a graduation, one that has reciprocity with TN and I am sure it will be totally inappropriate and against the rules/law to carry my concealed weapon inside so I leave my gun inside my automobile and it gets stolen while I am there. How responsible am I if that gun is used to kill someone by the person that stole my car?

This has been bugging me a lot! I know I am trying to borrow trouble but when something bugs me I need to but it to rest one way or the other.
 

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Guns&Dobes (love your avatar, by the way), I believe you would be MASSIVELY responsible, if the rules in the state you are going to are anything like the rules in the Peoples Democratic Republic of New York. Up here, if some freelance socialist steals your firearm, any kind of firearm, you have 72 hours to report it as stolen to the police. If you do this and the thief or someone else then uses it to perforate someone, you are not held liable. But if you don't, you will be held liable and prosecuted.

Notice I don't say this is fair. I think it is asinine. To use an analogy,it is as if someone stole your car and killed someone with it while driving drunk; and then the police arrested YOU and held YOU responsible because you owned the car and failed to report it as stolen! But the law is what it is.

I suggest you contact the cops in the locale where you'll be going and ask them what the rules on reporting stolen firearms are in that locale. But I'd assume the worst - that if your piece is stolen and later used in the commission of a crime, the cops will hold you responsible if you do not promptly report it. So do this.

Record the serial number, make, model and caliber of your weapon. Keep a copy of the information in your wallet, in your luggage and at home where you can lay hands on it easily. If you have a digital camera, take pictures of it too. Be sure to have a shot of each side of the weapon showing the information, and a shot of the serial number. keep those in your luggage and at home.

Then if, heaven forbid, your weapon does get stolen you can immediately report it as stolen. Giving the police the photos will also help them to track it down, especially if you've customized it with visible things like custom grips, aftermarket sights or an unusual finish.

The bottom line: assume the police are not your friends when it comes to a stolen firearm. They may or may not be able to get it back for you; but by giving them all the information possible to allow them to do so, you'll have covered your ass in a legal sense if someone does use it to commit a crime. The onus will be where it belongs, on the criminal, not on you.
 
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