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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sometimes when you get that bird back on the flight deck your problems are just beginning. Grumman A-6 Intruder which was quite a workhorse for the USN and USMC.

 

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The RA5C that I was Plane Captain on had a compressor stall right after launch off the USS Independence and pilot and B/N both punched out in the Aegean Sea.


We also had one catch the “net” when it’s hydraulics were blown out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here is a pretty recent carrier landing by one of the birds from VAW-113 Black Eagles which is one of the squadrons I was in many years ago. (1969-1970) When I was in in that squadron the iteration of the Hawkeye that we had was the E-2A and the iteration that is the most current now is the E-2D. They waved them off the first time and sent them around again. Carrier lands offer a rather abrupt stop if everything functions as designed.




 

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First time I saw a Hawkeye land I thought it was going to slip off the edge. The pilot had caught the last arresting wire and the vehicle stopped about 4-6 feet from the end of the flight deck.

There were a surprising number of females rated ABF in my day and very few were strong enough to handle the fuel hoses on the flight deck. It was a cushy job for them since they invariably ended up in the lab or on maintenance below decks. I think there's always a JP5 leak somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Here's a compilation of numerous flight deck mishaps, accidents, and fatalities. Situational awareness is paramount for survival up there, because everything can go from good to very bad in the twinkling of an eye. When the guy got sucked down the intake of the A-6 which has dual intakes and survived, he indeed was lucky that it wasn't a plane with a single intake such as the A-7 Corsair or the F-8 Crusader. People do not survive those.

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here's a bird's eye view of what the E-2 Hawkeye and it's crew of 5 provide for the battle field.
I am still rather fond of that bird.


 

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When deployed aboard the Constellation, we were doing Carquals off the coast of Hawaii and a deck hand got sucked up the intake of an A-7. He had 5 days left on board before he was to be flown home for discharge.
I almost went over the side while riding brakes on a RA5C during a night reshot during a storm, aircraft and all.
Yes, as ChaZam said, it’s a highly dangerous place to work and you need your head on a swivel constantly as things can go to hell in a hand basket in the blink of an eye….but I loved it!


P.S. today is the anniversary of the USS Forrestal fire-1967.


 

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When deployed aboard the Constellation, we were doing Carquals off the coast of Hawaii and a deck hand got sucked up the intake of an A-7. He had 5 days left on board before he was to be flown home for discharge.
I almost went over the side while riding brakes on a RA5C during a night reshot during a storm, aircraft and all.
Yes, as ChaZam said, it’s a highly dangerous place to work and you need your head on a swivel constantly as things can go to hell in a hand basket in the blink of an eye….but I loved it!


P.S. today is the anniversary of the USS Forrestal fire-1967.


I have a parishioner who was on the Forrestal the year before the fire and my mentor was on the ship the year after. A significant part of boot camp in 2008 was training for the Forrestal and the Cole incidents to not happen the same way again.
 

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My early Navy training included watching a video of the Forrestal fire incident during fire fighting training. I never went Navy bootcamp, being an OSVET. But we got a watered down dose of the training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Carriers have numerous ways of being resupplied during lengthy cruises. One such means is Carrier Onboard Delivery aka "COD". For about 50 years one aircraft that provided those services was the C-2 Greyhound which is basically a modified version of the E-2 Hawkeye without the 24' diameter radar dome and high end intel equipment converted for passenger and cargo usage. They transferred replacement personnel to and from the ship, mail to and from the ship, various supplies, parts, etc. Back in October of 69 when Huey Rider and me were on the Connie one of those crashed into the ocean roughly 10 miles short of the ship. The crew of 6 and 21 passengers and everything else onboard was lost. HM2 Donald C. Dean was enroute to my squadron and would have been assigned to the infirmary/sick bay aboard ship. Aviation squadrons had many non-aviation personnel such as Hospital Corpsmen, Yeomen, Master At Arms, assigned to them that subsequently did temporary duty in various other areas aboard the ship or base where the squadron was domiciled.

"FINAL MISSION OF HM2 DONALD C. DEAN
On October 2, 1969, a Grumman C-2 Greyhound cargo aircraft from Reserve Cargo Squadron 50 departed Cubi Point Naval Air Station, Republic of the Philippines on a shuttle flight to various aircraft carriers in the Gulf of Tonkin in Vietnam, including the USS Constellation, the USS Walker, the USS Hammer, and the USS Long Beach. The flight crew onboard the aircraft, assigned to Fleet Support Squadron 50 based in Atsugi Naval Air Station, Japan, included the pilot LT Herbert H. Dilger, co-pilot LT Richard A. Livingston, air crewman ADJ3 Paul K. Moser, aircraft captain ADJ3 Michael J. Tye, and loadmaster-trainee AMS3 Rayford J. Hill. The following passengers were aborad the flight: AME3 Terry L. Beck, ATR3 Richard W. Bell, ASE3 Michael L. Bowman, Frank Bytheway, PN1 Rolando C. Dayao, HM2 Donald C. Dean, AMH2 Carl J. Ellerd, AE2 James J. Fowler, HM3 Roy G. Fowler, YNC Leonardo M. Gan, MM1 Paul E. Gore, ABH3 William D. Gorsuch, AMS3 Delvin L. Kohler, AN Howard M. Koslosky, FTM2 Robert B. Leonard, AQB2 Ronald W. Montgomery, MM2 William R. Moore, ADJ2 Kenneth M. Prentice, SD2 Fidel G. Salazar, DS3 Keavin L. Terrell, ADJ3 Michael J. Tye, and TN Reynaldo R. Viado. Most of the twenty passengers appeared to have been bound for the USS Constellation, but one was bound for the USS Long Beach, and one of the four Philippine citizens on board was headed for the USS Hammer, and two to the USS Walker. The aircraft was inbound to the Constellation and made communication at about 0600 hours, reporting that operations were normal. When communications were established with the Carrier Air Control, control was passed to the Marshall controller (Approach Control). The carrier's radar continued tracking the aircraft until approximately 0655, at which time radar contact was lost at about 10 nautical miles from the Constellation. Helicopter search and rescue efforts were immediately initiated from the ship. The helicopter began sighting an oil slick and debris. A few pieces of aircraft were recovered, and analysis of this debris indicated that the aircraft was in a relatively high speed nose down, right wing down impact with the water or had a possible right wing failure before impact. There was no sign of survivors, nor were any bodies recovered. The crew and passengers onboard the C-2 which went down on October 2, 1969 were all declared Killed/Body Not Recovered. There is very little hope that they will ever be found. They are listed with honor among the missing because no remains were ever located to repatriate to their homeland. "

[Narrative taken from pownetwork.org; image from wikipedia.org]
 

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Yes, I remember that incident. I flew on C2’s on and off the ship a few times. Once while in the Med and in and out of Da Nang. Cat shots are cool!! Arrested landings are ok but you don’t pull the G’s as a Cat shot.

I lost my division officer on that cruise. While in port in Subic Bay, Philippines he was flying back seat with CAG (Carrier Air Group) commander at the controls up front when they tried flying through a mountain. They never figured out what went wrong. It was New Years Day 1970.
 
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