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Carriers have numerous ways of being resupplied during lengthy cruises. One such means is Carrier Onboard Delivery aka "COD". For about 50 years one aircraft that provided those services was the C-2 Greyhound which is basically a modified version of the E-2 Hawkeye without the 24' diameter radar dome and high end intel equipment converted for passenger and cargo usage. They transferred replacement personnel to and from the ship, mail to and from the ship, various supplies, parts, etc. Back in October of 69 when Huey Rider and me were on the Connie one of those crashed into the ocean roughly 10 miles short of the ship. The crew of 6 and 21 passengers and everything else onboard was lost. HM2 Donald C. Dean was enroute to my squadron and would have been assigned to the infirmary/sick bay aboard ship. Aviation squadrons had many non-aviation personnel such as Hospital Corpsmen, Yeomen, Master At Arms, assigned to them that subsequently did temporary duty in various other areas aboard the ship or base where the squadron was domiciled.

"FINAL MISSION OF HM2 DONALD C. DEAN
On October 2, 1969, a Grumman C-2 Greyhound cargo aircraft from Reserve Cargo Squadron 50 departed Cubi Point Naval Air Station, Republic of the Philippines on a shuttle flight to various aircraft carriers in the Gulf of Tonkin in Vietnam, including the USS Constellation, the USS Walker, the USS Hammer, and the USS Long Beach. The flight crew onboard the aircraft, assigned to Fleet Support Squadron 50 based in Atsugi Naval Air Station, Japan, included the pilot LT Herbert H. Dilger, co-pilot LT Richard A. Livingston, air crewman ADJ3 Paul K. Moser, aircraft captain ADJ3 Michael J. Tye, and loadmaster-trainee AMS3 Rayford J. Hill. The following passengers were aborad the flight: AME3 Terry L. Beck, ATR3 Richard W. Bell, ASE3 Michael L. Bowman, Frank Bytheway, PN1 Rolando C. Dayao, HM2 Donald C. Dean, AMH2 Carl J. Ellerd, AE2 James J. Fowler, HM3 Roy G. Fowler, YNC Leonardo M. Gan, MM1 Paul E. Gore, ABH3 William D. Gorsuch, AMS3 Delvin L. Kohler, AN Howard M. Koslosky, FTM2 Robert B. Leonard, AQB2 Ronald W. Montgomery, MM2 William R. Moore, ADJ2 Kenneth M. Prentice, SD2 Fidel G. Salazar, DS3 Keavin L. Terrell, ADJ3 Michael J. Tye, and TN Reynaldo R. Viado. Most of the twenty passengers appeared to have been bound for the USS Constellation, but one was bound for the USS Long Beach, and one of the four Philippine citizens on board was headed for the USS Hammer, and two to the USS Walker. The aircraft was inbound to the Constellation and made communication at about 0600 hours, reporting that operations were normal. When communications were established with the Carrier Air Control, control was passed to the Marshall controller (Approach Control). The carrier's radar continued tracking the aircraft until approximately 0655, at which time radar contact was lost at about 10 nautical miles from the Constellation. Helicopter search and rescue efforts were immediately initiated from the ship. The helicopter began sighting an oil slick and debris. A few pieces of aircraft were recovered, and analysis of this debris indicated that the aircraft was in a relatively high speed nose down, right wing down impact with the water or had a possible right wing failure before impact. There was no sign of survivors, nor were any bodies recovered. The crew and passengers onboard the C-2 which went down on October 2, 1969 were all declared Killed/Body Not Recovered. There is very little hope that they will ever be found. They are listed with honor among the missing because no remains were ever located to repatriate to their homeland. "

[Narrative taken from pownetwork.org; image from wikipedia.org]
That hit me a bit. I was HM2 when I discharged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
That hit me a bit. I was HM2 when I discharged.
Go to this link.
Scroll down to the "Remembrances".
The 3rd one titled "I Miss You Every Minute Of The Day" was posted by his wife on 10-16-2018.
That was 49 years and 14 days after that crash. I can only surmise that after almost 5 decades
she stumbled onto this link or some friend perhaps directed her to it. It's clear that she still has an empty spot...

 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Speaking of "Carrier Operations" this alphabetical list shows most of the dates that the carriers deployed on Westpac cruises during the Vietnam era were in port and which ports they visited. It's not entirely accurate though since it doesn't list the dates that the USS Constellation visited Pearl Harbor during the 69-70 cruise. I know we were there because I distinctly remember being advised to stay away from Hotel Street. I may or may not have heeded that advisory... (y) o_O;)

 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Speaking of the C-2 Greyhound and it's lengthy role as the fleet's primary means of carrier onboard delivery, I stumbled onto this video of the replacement aircraft. (CMV-22B) One primary advantage that itis going to immediately provide is the ability to land on ships other than aircraft carriers. Basically anything with a helo pad will be able to be serviced by them. Shore facilities will also be able to be serviced where a C-2 Greyhound couldn't possibly land or take off from.

 

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Discussion Starter · #31 · (Edited)
This video has some footage of the actually testing of the electromagnetic catapults that the Ford class carriers are getting with various types of aircraft. Before this they had some weighted sleds that they tested with over and over again working through all the problems. In this video they also show several arrested landings and I'll freely admit that I still get the heebie jeebies watching those arresting cables unspool just a few feet from men and equipment. Lots of ways to get hurt on a flight deck, but I think from a personal perspective the arresting cables and propellers tied for #1 as the things that I paid the most attention to. Of course jet blast and jet intakes left no room for error or complacency either. Watch also the rate of climb that the E-2D Hawkeye is capable of at about 7:45 in the video. For a rather large ungainly specimen that isn't nearly as svelte as all the rest of the machinery up there on the flight deck it does have some performance credibility.

 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Some of you all might recall this SNAFU.
Here's a very unfortunate episode that I was reminded of that happened many years ago. In a nutshell during some simulated war games a USN F-14 pilot from the USS Saratoga, for reasons that have never been suitably explained, misinterpreted the info he received and shot down a USAF RF-4C Phantom II. Ward Carroll, in addition to having a very informative YouTube channel is also the author of "Punk's War" and some other books. Even before his USN retirement he was a Fox News contributor that many of you might remember from the post 9/11 era.

 

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Hotel Street….I stand on the 5th Ammendment! o_O😝
FYI:

In his 2016 book “Hotel Street Harry,” Thomas Rhys quotes an anonymous U.S. Army reporter who under the byline “Hotel Street Harry” commended the prostitutes of Honolulu’s Hotel Street for helping wounded Americans on and in the aftermath of Dec. 7, 1941:

“As the Japanese planes were still dropping their bombs, the working women of Hotel Street became unexpected and much needed first responders, rushing to Hickam Field and Pearl Harbor to help thousands of wounded Americans. The women, comfortable dealing with intimate situations, bandaged and nursed the men and donated gallons of their blood (which the Army doctors knew was clean). And with the overflow of patients and shortage of hospital beds on Oahu, the women of Hotel Street gave up their own rooms, turning the brothels into hospital wards. For this selfless action way beyond the call of duty, the ladies of Hotel Street earned the lasting admiration, respect and loyalty of the men of the United States Armed Forces.”


 

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My dad was on a CVE during WW2. One of the crew ignored the warning siren and tried to get on the elevator as it lifted from the hanger deck. He was cut in half.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
My dad was on a CVE during WW2. One of the crew ignored the warning siren and tried to get on the elevator as it lifted from the hanger deck. He was cut in half.
Wow, that would be a terrible way to go...
 

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My dad was on a CVE during WW2. One of the crew ignored the warning siren and tried to get on the elevator as it lifted from the hanger deck. He was cut in half.
OUCH!! 😳
 

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Nice carrier arrest video. What is the button on the left side of the yoke the pilot keeps fingering? Trim?
Yes, trim.
A bit late to the party. Yup. 777 has the same thing as do most airplanes. On the stick we have a ****** hat.

Oh, that's nuts......the autocorrect censored out c oolie hat. Which is what we called the trim button on the stick.

looks like he flys that plane by the thumb! :D
That's actually a good way to do it ! Once you get most airplanes trimmed up they fly themselves pretty well.

FWIW, on newer airplanes like the 777, when I trim if everything is working correctly I'm simply resetting the fly by wire trim reference speed of the slab. If I double click the trim in fairly rapid order, it'll trim to whatever airspeed I'm indicating right then which is kinda convenient when hand flying.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
That's actually a good way to do it ! Once you get most airplanes trimmed up they fly themselves pretty well.
Question? Is the constant trim adjustment due to it having multiple propped engines and both of them turning the same direction? Strictly from a cost per unit perspective I would guess that costs would be considerably higher if the rotating assemblies of right and left hand engines were engineered and reversed to negate that torque. Boats with multiple engines frequently have clockwise and counterclockwise rotation engines so that the rotational torque on the hull is neutralized by the reverse rotation engine and prop assembly. They'll also have trim plates for adjusting due to weight distribution from passengers, water for the head, fuel levels, and things like that which are always changing.
 

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Question? Is the constant trim adjustment due to it having multiple propped engines and both of them turning the same direction? Strictly from a cost per unit perspective I would guess that costs would be considerably higher if the rotating assemblies of right and left hand engines were engineered and reversed to negate that torque. Boats with multiple engines frequently have clockwise and counterclockwise rotation engines so that the rotational torque on the hull is neutralized by the reverse rotation engine and prop assembly. They'll also have trim plates for adjusting due to weight distribution from passengers, water for the head, fuel levels, and things like that which are always changing.
The yoke trim switches are for pitch and constant trimming is usually due to minor changes in airspeed or wing loading. Fr' instance, if I roll into a 60 degree banked turn (which is fairly steep) my load factor doubles which means I need to pull alot harder to maintain level flight (in a coordinated 60 degree banked turn I pull 2 G's; it varies with the reciprocal of the cosine so it's not linear. Most commercial airliners never bank more than 30 degrees and turns are between 20 and 30 degrees). In steep turns, I don't usually trim (because I get all that lift back when I roll out) but some do and it's all technique.

I've usually taken short kinda bursts of trim (and I think that's what he does) but the yoke trim is usually just for pitch (on a stick the c oolie hat moves back and forth for pitch and side to side for aileron trim which is roll). Think that's what he does and it's a pretty constant process of fine tuning for some. Our yaw trim was always somewhere else than the stick or yoke (whether a knob somewhere or a momentary contact switch).

The OV-10 had counter-rotating props to reduce P-factor (the left turning tendency which makes a failure of the left engine worse than the right because you need right rudder anyhow and it just gets more so if the left engine isn't producing thrust. If they counter rotate it eliminates this. It might also help reduce drag somewhat in that you don't have to counter a left turning tendency when both engines are running). Many twins do this; not sure what the E-2 does (whether the props counter rotate or not). Some (incorrectly) say that counter rotating props eliminates the 'critical' engine (the one whose failure most adversely affects aircraft handling)--this isn't really true--it does REDUCE it a fair bit but there's usually always a 'critical' engine (might not be THAT critical when they counter rotate). If possible, you always want the wind across the good engine when landing single engine and you always want to minimize the bank angle of turns into the dead engine (because that wing has lost lift too and it accentuates the turning moment). A C-130 was lost a few years back when the pilot (among other things) was aggressively maneuvering into a dead engine and it was just enough that when combined with other errors the wing stalled.
 
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