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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Well... back in the day, I met up with a girl who took the offer to shoot mine to see if she wanted to purchase one for herself. Two NRA instructors happened to be at the same range and inserted themselves into the conversation (UNinvited) and basically told her and I (and her husband) that 1911s were too difficult for women and revolvers were "Idiot proof" so all women would be better off with them. I didn't doctor that conversation summary up... that is exactly what they said. Then they continued to converse with each other about how much they were in agreement with each other (regarding the "idiot-proof-ness" of revolvers as pertains to women).

Now, I was standing there ARMED. 1911 ON. MY. HIP. And they were standing there, in essence calling me stupid. (Did I mention I was ARMED?) Who was the stupid one? :rolleyes:

Exactly the point I wasnt trying to make about a revolver for her! I know me, and when I become interseted in something I go HAM! I stick with it for years, I read I reaserch I play. My wife is somewhat the opposite. Right now she wants to own a gun, and that fine, I want her to be safe, but I know she is not going to be like me as far as practicing, upkeep, and so on. So in my mind (new to the world of handguns) I thought the revolver would be better.

This is not to say that her, being a woman, had nothing to do with it, but I looked at it with the idea that if the SHTF, I want her to be able to kick said S#%$ as quick and easy as possible and bring herself home.

Ive since learned the error of my ways, thanks to you fine folks, but I can see why people think that way sometimes.
 

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This has got me thinking a LOT about getting another handgun for my wife. I have been eyeing one for myself, as an upgrade for my Ruger for quite some time, especially considering that my wife has claimed my Ruger! But now, I think that the Ruger may not be the best thing for her (P90 is awful heavy in that handbag), and perhaps I should get her something more her style, and get my old Ruger back. She likes safety as much as I do, so I'm thinking compact 1911 in .40 or 9mm. I have access to a few different guns and calibers to let her try. I need to set up a range day.
 

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Hmmmmmmm......

This thread reminds me of how I ended up becoming a gun "collector" in the first place.

It all started when I taught my wife how to shoot, and then attempted to help her pick out a CC gun.

We went through a dozen different guns. The latest iteration is the Glock 23 (mid sized .40 S&W). She is very happy with it, for the time being.

I have found that the biggest problem with a woman acquiring a CC gun is that many of them approach the process in the same way that they buy shoes. I am sure that we are all well aware of the stereotypical "shoe collections" in the female world. The women who get serious about shooting and self-defense do seem to get an appropriate gun in short order. The ones that approach it half-hearted, and as if it is a fashion accessory, or are just trying to agree with another person's input, have a very difficult time settling on a suitable gun for themselves.

This whole process gets even more convoluted by the input from men trying to "help" women pick out the gun that will work for them.

New shooters, not just women, do not have enough experience and/or knowledge base to actually decide which gun will work best for them. As they gain experience/knowledge, their viewpoints and desires about hand guns change.

It has been my experience that it is very rare for an individual to pick out the ONE gun that they will carry for years, on their very first pick. I attempt to make new shooters aware of this phenomenon, and explain that it is not a bad thing. We all "grow" at different rates, and our wants and needs change with time, experience, and circumstances. Buying a hand gun is NOT a marriage contract. If it does not work out, it can be sold, and another can be purchased. Being wrong about a gun choice is only bad if one stubbornly sticks with a bad choice in spite of learning that it is not optimal.

My greatest concern about people going for a semi-auto hand gun early in their shooting experience is the lack of training and drilling they are willing to do to make sure they can handle any, and all, malfunctions in an efficient and rapid manner.

Semi-auto hand guns are extremely pleasant to shoot, but when they malfunction, most folks freeze up, and do not apply the correct procedures to get back into action, UNLESS they have drilled them extensively.

To those who DO carry semi-autos and practice/drill extensively, my hat is off to you.

To those who encourage/allow a new shooter to buy a semi-auto, instead of a revolver, without making DARN SURE they can handle all the malfunction drills efficiently, and without freezing up, I say you are doing them a disservice, and setting them up for a possible future bad consequence.

I have no bias one way or the other for a revolver or semi-auto hand gun being the "choice" of a new hand gun owner AS LONG AS THEY ARE PROFICIENT WITH THE GUN THEY CHOOSE. The simple fact is that semi-autos are easier to pull the trigger on, so they seem to be more readily sought as the new shooter's choice. There is a cost for that "easier trigger pull" that a lot of experienced shooters take for granted, and inexperienced shooters are unaware of. That cost is the possible FTF, FTE, Jam, Stovepipe, limp-wristing, etc. malfunction category, combined with the initial magazine loading and slide racking that is inherent in a semi-auto pistol.

Some shooters can deal with it. Some shooters can not. Gender does not have as much to do with it as willingness, and upper body strength.

Sorry about getting so long winded, but this is a complex issue that gets beat to death on gun forums, without ever being thoroughly examined.

The bottom line is this: it does not matter WHAT hand gun a new shooter decides to buy, IF THEY ARE WILLING TO ADEQUATELY DRILL IT TO PROFICIENCY, or if they are willing to change guns if they discover that their first choice does not work as they thought it would. The best time to learn this is on the range, NOT in a life or death situation.

No one has any business carrying a hand gun on a daily basis if they are not proficient in it's use, and proficient in it's corrective measures when it does not work as expected.
 

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