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Cleaners, Lubes, and Protectants

4787 Views 50 Replies 19 Participants Last post by  Laufer
Wasn't sure where to put this, so here we go. I go back to work tomorrow and am on for 2 weeks which I will have limited time to check in. So, I figured I would stir the pot and leave...馃ぃ馃槀馃ぃ馃槀 I know this is an age old discussion but I have thoughts and questions.

First of all, I am not a fan of the 3 in 1 products. If I am going to clean, I want a cleaner. I generally use Hoppes and or WD-40 to clean with. I like these and they work well for me. For Me.

When it comes to lubrication, I like 3 in 1 Machine Oil (I know, I know), or a good quality lightweight engine oil. There are a few actual Gun Oils on the market I would like to try, but haven' yet. Shooters Lube is one I can think of right off hand.

Last, but not least there is protectant. I have in the past and currently used RemOil. It seems to work well. I have used the 3 in 1 Machine Oil for this as well, but like the RemOil better for this application.

What is everyone's "Go To"? Favorites? Reasons why? Reasons why not? Thoughts? Opinions?
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That must have come in a 55 gallon drum, or you haven't been shooting much in 47 years LOL! :p
You would be right Mindy if I had bought a 55 gallon drum would have saved money. At my age just happy to still enjoy the shooting sports and work with younger shooters.
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Like hearing what everyone is using for lubricant and bore scrubbing. What about Bore Snakes!! That should get some comments!
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Like hearing what everyone is using for lubricant and bore scrubbing. What about Bore Snakes!! That should get some comments!
Love them. I have multiple. I don't rely on them exclusively for cleaning, but more as an additional tool. For example, I'll soak a BS in solvent and pull it through the bore and let it sit for a while...the solvent loosens the gunk up and doesn't evaporate so quickly, then when it's pulled out, most of the fouling comes with it. After the soak I use a strandard rod and patches.

I also have a few that I use specifically for oiling after the cleaning was done.

When I go on hunts, I always have a boresnake with me just in case the bore gets dirty while in the field or I get caught in the rain.
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What about Bore Snakes!! That should get some comments!
I love them. For routine cleaning firearms not fired - I usually run a Hoppes soaked patch down the bore then follow-up with two passes of the snake, and then a silicone oil patch. If I fired the weapon, then its a thorough cleaning and the snake gets used at the end followed by a silicone oil patch for the bore and lube up the slide to frame friction points. Works for me but I know everyone has their own process.
Bore Snakes, essential equipment in my book.
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Bore Snakes: I like the originals but I've had some that have failed prematurely. Like the material was not properly wound.
But other than that they are fantastic and are great as a basic field cleaning tool that can be carried in a AR pistol grip.
I like the Tipton cleaning rods, tips and brushes also.
And the Otis cleaning kits are what I have packed away for range and field use.
I also have a few sectioned GI cleaning rods that I deburred and polished for field cleaning.
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How many of you make your own cleaning patches? Not that I actually "make" them, but I will cut up old flannel sheets and such into various sizes for the purpose.
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Count me in Mindy! Cut up a couple of T shirts while cleaning the bore of my dad's 98k many moon ago. Bore was filthy and would have spent a fortune on patches and swabs. old flannel and cotton shirts did a decent job along with brush and Hoppes 9.
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Bore Snakes: I like the originals but I've had some that have failed prematurely. Like the material was not properly wound.
But other than that they are fantastic and are great as a basic field cleaning tool that can be carried in a AR pistol grip.
I like the Tipton cleaning rods, tips and brushes also.
And the Otis cleaning kits are what I have packed away for range and field use.
I also have a few sectioned GI cleaning rods that I deburred and polished for field cleaning.
My practice is to use the boresnakes with the cloth pull soaked in Gunzilla at the range for a quick first pass through, six or eight pulls through, plus a rub on the bolt face to get the new powder residue and fouling loosened up and soaking in the Gunzilla before it has a chance to really lock into the metal. (If I'm shooting corrosive primer ammo, a cup of deodorized ammonia is poured through the bore before the boresnake is used.) When I get the piece home, I go after it with the traditional bore brushes and Gunzilla-soaked pads, dental picks for the tight spots, etc.

But you can get along for quite awhile with just the boresnake if you refresh the Gunzilla before each use, I've found.
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Will try Gunzilla Cyrano! Enjoy trying something new. Actually I like cleaning firearms.
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Will try Gunzilla Cyrano! Enjoy trying something new. Actually I like cleaning firearms.
I find it therapeutic, personally.
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Gunzilla works well for me.
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What about a product called "Shooters Lube"? Anyone have any experience with it.?

Or the "Lucas Extreme Duty Gun Oil"?
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I've always wanted to buy a Boresnake but I never have. Sounds like they are quite popular, maybe I should...
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With all the cleaning surface they should do a good job. Bought a new one for my 1100 which I use for trap. Did a decent job for sure.
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The boresnakes do a great job indeed, but remember, they need to be cleaned on occasion. We don't run dirty patches back through a barrel after cleaning it right? If you don't wash your snake, you are essentially doing the same thing. The good news is the BS can take in a great deal of dirt before needing to be washed, so it doesn't need to be washed every time you use it - - unless you used it to clear out mud and such. There is even more good news, they are easy to wash by soaking in hot water with dawn or your favorite clothes detergent, a bit of agitation, then a hot water rinse - - hang to dry.
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Yep Mindy. Soak mine in a cut down milk jug with detergent added. Rinse and hang to dry.
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I cleaned one of mine in the dishwasher once, to the outrage of Her Imperial Majesty.
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We used to use knotted 550 cord as a bore-snake in a pinch.
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I agree with Mindy here, but then I agree with about everything Mindy says. 馃榿
I have used a ton of products, but seldom (if ever) fail to clean a gun within a few days of shooting it.
Tend to think that you may not have the "Soul" of a shooter if you don't have a bottle of Hoppes #9 and G96 on the bench. Even if you only use them as if they were scent candles. (esp. Hoppes). Even if you are cleaning a beat up old Mosin that has had lead through it for years, and not been cleaned, you still must have an open bottle of Hoppes just to set the tone. Anyone who differs with this kind of quirky behavior, probably didn't use Hoppes in their youth.
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Yeah recall when a bottle of Hoppes always came with the gun cleaning kits we used to buy for around $3 as a kid cleaning my first .22 Also that black grease called "Gunslick" in the silver tube was a stand-by.
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