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Just curious. I bought a never fired 1968 Winchester 94 Illinois Sesquicentennial rifle with no box. Browsing online, I found the correct box for this rifle marked "Model 9451IS & Illinois Sesquicentennial". Seller knows it's special and is asking $175.00 OBO for the box. Would I recoup my $175 should I ever decide to sell the gun? It will be shot every now and then at the range and likely remain in mint condition.
 

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Just curious. I bought a never fired 1968 Winchester 94 Illinois Sesquicentennial rifle with no box. Browsing online, I found the correct box for this rifle marked "Model 9451IS & Illinois Sesquicentennial". Seller knows it's special and is asking $175.00 OBO for the box. Would I recoup my $175 should I ever decide to sell the gun? It will be shot every now and then at the range and likely remain in mint condition.
Just my 2 cents, BUT:
It very well might have the serial number of the rifle that was shipped in it also, or it might have tags or markings with dates and destinations applied by the distributor, carrier, or dealer it shipped to that do not agree with the rifle you purchased. If that is indeed the case I really doubt that it would add much collector value at all to your rifle; certainly not $175.00. I would do some careful scrutiny of the pictures of it and ask lots of questions before spending that kind of money.
 

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Wow $175 for a box. I would pass myself. Friend bought the Oliver Winchester commemorative back around 1980 for around $600 I recall. It was in 38-55 caliber along with a box of shells to go with it. Hope you got yours for a decent price. Were nice looking guns.
 

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A generic box might add 10% to the value of the piece. The only way you'd make back a significant amount of that $175 is if it had any markings specific to your rifle.

I'd pass on the box.
 

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YES! having the correct box, for the correct model, from the same year, even without the same serial will increase the value. The older or rarer the gun, the higher this value could be. Having the original box is a significant markup beyond that.

STORY TIME:
For several years I was on the comics and collectibles convention circuit. I used to go to thrift stores all the time on their "put out" days, flea markets on the weekend mornings, and hit yard sales and garage sales on Saturday afternoons after the flea market. For this reason I got to be friends and acquantances with a lot of other people in similar lines; the uranium and art glass collectors, the McCoy pottery lady, the rare books collectors, video game and VHS collectors, etc.

Of particular interest was a man who had made sizeable amounts of money hunting down the tchotchkes that you find at places like Bennigans, Applebees, and Cracker Barrel. He claimed to have cleared an average of $280,000 per year before those companies realized they could hire a bunch of basement dwellers to do the same thing on places like eBay.

With the restaurants no longer buying, he diversified, and one of his lines is gun boxes. He goes to yard sales and garage sales where guns were listed and asks if the family has any old gun boxes. Some of these boxes are worth thousands.

His grand prize, thus far, was an original 1873 Winchester rifle box from 1883 that a family had an old aluminum Christmas tree stored in. I think he got $450 for the tree and $2,800 for the box.

This guy was a talker, so admittedly I only half-paid attention to him some times, but he was telling me about one old Colt revolver where he bought the box for $25, sold it for $300, and the guy he sold it to claimed that the box increased the value of his revolver by more than $1,000.
 

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Yes, the older or more rare the box, the bigger the return. That's true. Especially when paired with the piece that goes with it. But not if the item was mass produced or less than 50 years old unless it has the matching documentation.

I'm an avid NASCAR die cast collector, and focused on 2 drivers. At the moment I've got over 100 pieces in the collection. At least 85% of them have the original display boxes and of those, I've got about 75% of the warehouse outer boxes. Do the warehouse boxes add to the value? You bet they do. But only 10-15%.

What really adds to the value is the paperwork that came with each car. That means the manufacturer's certificate of authenticity, limited edition numbers, and in the case of my autographed cars,the CoA of the autograph. The ones I got autographed personally have photos of the driver signing the car and in 5 cases pictures of the driver, the signed car and me. All of this can add up to $1000s in value.
 

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People confuse New In Box with just having a box. Just having a box isn't all that much of an increase in value but if the weapon is New In Box then the value increases greatly.

Gun Grading System

NIB (NEW IN BOX)
This category can sometimes be misleading. It means that the firearm is in its original factory carton with all of the appropriate papers. It also means the firearm is new, that it has not been fired, and has no wear. This classification brings a substantial premium for both the collector and shooter. It should be noted that NIB values are not the same as MSRP (manufacturer’s suggested retail price), but rather are “street prices” that can be considerably lower than the MSRP. A NIB value should closely represent the selling price for a new, unfired gun in the box.

In some situations, if the gun is very valuable, if new in box then it can be as much as twice as valuable.
 

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I have a designated storage space where I keep all original boxes, complete with sales receipts and everything in them. My wife has been instructed that if I pass first, to put the guns and boxes together to take to a specific seller. What that does is prove it is a one owner gun. Then the condition gives them an idea as to it's value.

My buddy once was offered a model 36 Smith and Wesson at his table at a gun show. The elderly couple claimed they bought it to keep in their RV but now were too old to travel. They wanted $300 which was a fair price at the time. They said they had only fired it 5 times to make sure it worked. When they produced the box and a box of ammo with 5 rounds missing, it was a nano second before his $300 came out.

I am told there are a lot of 454 Casull that are sold with the first box of ammo still partially full.
 

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I have the original box for 4 Winchester rifles (and 8 S&W revolvers, and all 1911's).

I doubt the rifle box increases the value more than $50. Just guessing, and I will never sell them. My kids will deal with it.
165709
 
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Um...no. 🍳

Tony Stewart and Kevin Harvick.

Why anybody would be a fan of Little Jeffy Foo Foo is beyond me...lol
Matt Kenseth and Tony Stewart were two of the best dudes when I was still covering racing.

I never met Gordon, but his pit crew were some good guys. When I was walking through the garages, guys on his team were loaning and trading parts with other teams, and any ribbing was in good fun between teams.

It has been nearly a decade since I covered racing though. I doubt I could even name a half dozen active drivers these days.
 

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I'm a Ford guy so Joey Lagano and Brad Keselowski.
165711


Bringing the heat to those Toyota's.
 

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I am told there are a lot of 454 Casull that are sold with the first box of ammo still partially full.
Yup, I might have shared a story like that on here of another gun store owner who made several times his investment on a .454 when they first came out because people kept returning it.

By sheer luck he was the only gun store in a 150 mile radius to get one when they first came out. He sold it, and the guy came in a couple of days later with a bandaged wrist, and just a couple of rounds missing from the box. Before he had even put a tag back on the gun, another guy bought it. A few days later that guy came back with a scar on his head because he floppy-armed it under recoil. This went on several more times with people complaining.

Finally a college kid came in and bought it. The gun went with about half that original box of ammo. The kid kept it for months, and in the mean time the shop owner was able to get another new one in stock.

One day the kid comes back with the gun and the shopkeeper asks why he is returning it.The kid says he loves the gun, but he needs to sell it.

Need the money? Not really.
Did the gun hurt you? No, I love shooting it.

Before the owner could squeeze out another question the kid's girlfriend comes in with her arm in a sling and a big gash in her forehead. "Did you get rid of that &%*$#( thing yet," she yelled.

I have heard vaguely similar stories about the .500 S&W. An ER doctor friend of mine used to work at Carraway, which was the hospital right outside of the projects in Birmingham. He joked about how many wrists he treated from thugs shooting their Desert Eagles ghetto-style.
 

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I have boxes for 4 of my 7 Winchester's (6 Carbines and one rifle).
165725


I got started before you guys did.

I also have boxes on most of my early S&W revolvers. I have the matching solid line along with broken line. The sold line is worth more.
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165732


165733

165734
 

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If you want to see insane prices, look at antique cartridge boxes. A full box of .41 Short Colt Rifle will run you $1,100 to $1,300, and the empty box is a couple hundred dollars by itself.

Some things do get weird, though. I have an almost full box of .41 rimfire Kleenbore cartridges. The full box in the condition it is in can fetch upwards of $2,000.

The crazy thing is that in both these cases you could actually sell individual rounds, and then the empty boxes, for more money.
 
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