Crow recipes?

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by alleyyooper, Feb 5, 2020.

  1. jwrauch

    jwrauch G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

    Are there any recipes for coyote ?? I know they often both eat similar foods and from what I hear coyotes are one stinking animal to skin !!!
     
  2. Cajun Coyote Recipe

    INGREDIENTS:

    * 2 cups vegetable oil

    * 2 tablespoons Cajun seasoning

    * 2 tablespoons dried Italian-style seasoning

    * 2 tablespoons lemon pepper

    * garlic powder to taste

    * 2lbs of fresh thawed coyote meat – pounded to 1/2 inch thickness

    DIRECTIONS:

    1. In a large shallow dish, mix the oil, Cajun seasoning, Italian seasoning, garlic powder, and lemon pepper. Place the coyote meat in the dish, and turn to coat with the mixture. Cover, and refrigerate for 1/2 hour.

    2. Preheat the grill for high heat.

    3. Lightly oil the grill grate. Drain coyote, and discard marinade. Place coyote on hot grill and cook for 6 to 8 minutes on each side, or until juices run clear.

    There's recipes for both crow and coyote, ya just gotta google it.
     

  3. jwrauch

    jwrauch G&G Evangelist Forum Contributor

    Thanks but I think I'll pass !!!
     
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  4. runfiverun

    runfiverun G&G Evangelist

    you better learn the difference between a raven and a crow.
    we have a hunting season for crows but not for ravens.
    since 90+% of the birds out here are ravens and the fine is like "capitol punishment", you need to know how to tell them apart from the tail and wing shape.

    they might not have made a distinction all over Europe or the middle east but the U.S. Government sure makes one.
     
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  5. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper G&G Evangelist

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    Michigan
    Lots of Ravens in the UP of Michigan also. Ravens tent to run bigger and have a different sound also.

    I have skined a lot of coyotes and fleshed them out and sewn the holes up. I have only ran into a few I felt stunk.
    A few ya I felt had rooled in the farmers manure pit but not all.

    Could also be a difference between eastern coyotes and western coyotes too.

    Crock pot coyote.
    2-4 lbs of coyote meat
    16 oz of apricot preserves
    1 bottle BBQ sauce
    1/2 purple onion diced
    1/2 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp pepper
    1/2 tsp garlic powder
    Instructions: Throw all the ingredients in a crock pot and let them cook for about 8 hours.


    Coyote soup.
    Coyote Hind quarter
    cooking oil
    2 cups red wine
    3 onions, chopped
    1 garlic clove
    salt and pepper
    spices
    2 cabbage heads, chopped
    8 potato’s, chopped
    Cut meat into chunks and brown in oil. Add wine, onions, garlic, salt and pepper and your other favorite spices. Cook for 30 minutes. Add cabbage and potatoes. Cook until tender.

    VIETNAMESE STIR FRIED COYOTE WITH LEMON GRASS.
    THE MARINADE.
    1 Stick fresh or 2tb dried
    Slices lemon grass
    2 lb Coyote meat, cut into
    Small pieces
    1 Garlic clove, large
    0.5" cube fresh ginger
    1 tb Sugar
    1 1/2 tb Tomato paste
    1/2 ts Salt
    1/4 ts Chili powder
    1/4 ts Ground turmeric

    Also needed
    2 Cloves garlic
    3 tb Vegetable oil
    1 tb Fish sauce OR salt to taste
    4-8 tb coyote stock
    3 1/2 oz Onions

    First prepare the marinade. If you are using fresh lemon grass, cut it
    crossways into very thin slices, starting at the bulbous bottom end and
    going up around 6". Discard the straw like top. If you are using dried lemon
    grass, soak it in 4 tb of hot water for an hour. Put the coyote pieces in
    a bowl, add the fresh lemon grass or the drained soaked dried lemon grass
    (save the soaking liquid). Peel and crush the large garlic clove, peel the
    ginger and grate it finely. Add the garlic
    , ginger, sugar, tomato paste,
    salt, chilli powder and turmeric to the coyote. Mix, cover and set aside
    for 1-24 hours, refrigerating if necessary. Peel and finely chop the two
    garlic cloves. Put the oil in a wok or large, lidded frying pan and set
    over a high heat. When it is hot, put in the garlic. Stir and fry for 30
    secs or until the garlic is golden. Add the coyote along with its
    marinade. Stir and fry for 5-6 mins or until the coyote browns a little.
    Add the fish sauce and either the lemon grass soaking liquid or 4 tb stock.
    Stir once and cover. Cook on a high heat for 5 mins. Lift the lid and stir,
    adding another 4 tb of stock. Cover, turn the heat to low and cook for
    another 5 mins. While the coyote cooks, peel the onions and cut them into
    0.75" dice. Separate the onion layers within the diced pieces. Turn the
    heat under the coyote to high, remove the wok lid, add the onion and fry
    for 1 minute. Lift the coyote out its oil and serve.


    Howlin' Coyote Stew
    1/2 cup uncooked lentils
    2 large or 4 small potatoes - well scrubbed, but not peeled
    2 good sized carrots, quartered lengthwise and cut into 3/4" slices
    2 good sized stalks of celery, chopped
    1 tsp whole fennel seeds 2 cloves finely chopped garlic, more if you like
    2 cups low sodium tomato juice
    2 cups water or veg broth
    1 tablespoon chili powder, more if you like
    1 healthy pinch crushed red pepper
    1/2 tsp basil
    1/2 tsp oregano

    Dump all ingredients in pressure cooker. Bring to high pressure. Cook 8 minutes. Let pressure release naturally. Add salt to taste
    This is very thick and hearty. If it's too thick, add some water or veg broth.


    Coyote Quesadilla


    • 1 (6-ounce) boned out, coyote hind quarter
    • 1 tablespoon Blackening Spice, recipe follows
    • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    • 6 ounces canned refried beans
    • 3/4 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
    • 3/4 cup shredded pepper jack cheese
    • 2 tablespoons chopped green onion
    • 1 tablespoon finely chopped cilantro leaves
    • 1 Roma tomato, diced
    • 3 large flour tortillas
    • 1 tablespoon granulated garlic
    • 1 tablespoon freshly crack black pepper
    • 2 teaspoons granulated onion
    • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
    • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    • 1 teaspoon paprika
    • 1/2 tablespoon salt
    Directions.

    Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
    Rinse and pat dry the coyote meat dry, and rub with 1 tablespoon of the Blackening Spice. Heat the oil in a cast iron skillet over high heat, add the chicken and cook until brown and cooked through, about 6 minutes on each side. Remove to a cutting board, cool slightly and slice. Cover to keep warm.
    Heat the beans in a small pot over low heat until heated through and keep warm. Prepare the remaining ingredients and have them ready for assembly.
    Heat a griddle or cast iron pan to high and toast the tortillas on both sides until crisp (if you try to fold them, they will crack).
    Lay out 1 tortilla on a cookie sheet and evenly spread it with half of the beans, 1/3 of the cheeses, 1/2 of the blackened coyote, 1 tablespoon of the green onions, and cover with a second tortilla. Repeat this layering order with the remaining ingredients. Finish with the third tortilla and garnish with the remaining cheese, cilantro and diced tomatoes. Bake for 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and portion with a slicing knife into 4 wedges.

    Coyote Stew
    Chunk up 2lbs of coyote meat into 1/2" cubes, fry in pan.
    1/2can mild Pace Picante sauce
    1/2 can tomato sauce
    1 can corn
    1 can green beans
    mix meat, sauces, and veggies in pot, stew for 5 hours.


    I like me some young tender coyote.

    :D Al
     
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  6. grizcty

    grizcty God, Guns, Glory Forum Contributor

    For some reason, I dont think this pertains to posters in this thread... :D

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Dragunov

    Dragunov G&G Evangelist

    Salt, pepper, a little "Accent" sometimes, roll in seasoned flour, fry. This is how I do ANY wild game, that I'm not making soup, or steaks from.
     
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  8. PaleHawkDown

    PaleHawkDown G&G Evangelist

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    The point was one of legendary and historical significance regarding dietary restrictions and taboos. I don't need to know the difference to know that most of the modern world and nearly all of history did NOT make such a distinction.

    I will put my argument and yours into other terms within a religious context:

    My argument: Strict Amish people cannot have cars
    Your argument: You need to know the difference between Ford and Chevy.

    My argument: Jews can't eat pork
    Your argument: You need to know the difference between an African boar and a domestic pig.

    My argument: the cow is sacred to Hindus
    Your argument: You need to know the difference between a Hereford and a Wagyu.

    My argument: To the Apache, the eating of any bear meat was taboo.
    Your argument: You need to know the difference between Polar bears and black bears.

    My argument: to the Navajo, burnt foods were taboo
    Your argument: You need to know the difference between burnt salmon and burnt marshmallows.

    My argument: Extremely devout Catholics do not eat meat on Friday.
    Your argument: You need to know the difference between beef and poultry.

    Clearly the "subspecies" in each of these arguments is less important than the "species" itself when dealing with cultural taboo and religious restriction.
     
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  9. shanebrews

    shanebrews G&G Evangelist

    Salt, pepper, garlic and vinegar will render most anything edible. Perhaps some chopped onion too.
     
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  10. runfiverun

    runfiverun G&G Evangelist

    that's close.
    only,,, I don't have to deal with any of those people.


    I do have to deal with the game warden [and consequently a judge] from time to time.
    hence knowing the difference saves me both time and money.

    just like knowing a Navajo will purposely burn a marshmallow and take the inside out to eat, but eating the burnt outside isn't acceptable,,, that could save you much embarrassment.
    it's the little things that make the difference.
     
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  11. Dragunov

    Dragunov G&G Evangelist

    All animals = "Self Propelled Food Rations"
    Burnt Marshmallows = "Stationary Dessert Rations"
    Edible plants = "Non-mobile food rations, that wish they could get away faster"
     
  12. Dragunov

    Dragunov G&G Evangelist

    I will purposely burn a marshmallow, and will purposely eat the whole thing.
     
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  13. Dragunov

    Dragunov G&G Evangelist

    I don't care WHAT it is. If God didn't want it et... He shouldn't have made it out of meat. If it moves IMHO, it is FAIR GAME. That includes Horses, various bugs, Gar, Carp, Dillo's 'Yote's, cats, dogs, and parakeets. To me, they're all Self-Propelled food rations.
     
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  14. jerry

    jerry Since 03-15- 2002 Forum Contributor

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    USA
    Have you ever read a post starting backwards and thought to yourself, what the heck?


    Sent from my iPhone using Gun and Game
     
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  15. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper G&G Evangelist

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    I agree the only thing wrong with the SPPFR is in a persons mind.

    All those critters are ET some place in the world.

    Al
     
  16. blue fox

    blue fox G&G Evangelist

    How to cook crow.
    1 pluck and clean one Crow
    2 place a pot of water on fire to boil
    3 add spices of choice, carrots, celery, onions, peas and potatos
    4 let boil till veggies are tender but not mushy.
    5 throw crow in trash and enjoy veggies with drink of choice.
     
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