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I would like to know if anybody knows of what kind of dog would make a good trailing dog for downed deer ?Also how would you go about training the dog to go about finding a downed deer?
 

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First, I need to say that fundamentally I am opposed to using dogs to hunt deer. However, that has not always been the case. In my younger days I used dogs to hunt deer. I have come to realize that the way most dog hunters conduct themselves nowadays is not conducive to the traditional hunting ethic or to the positive public perception of the sport. Also, even if the sport were "ethical" in my view, the country in becoming too populated to continue this type hunting. Now, let me get off my soapbox and try too help you with your question. I understand why you want the dog and I agree that it is the "best" use of a deer dog. Their are few things that I hate worse (except liberals and hot beer) than leaving a wounded animal in the woods.

I think your best bet would be to ask some of the "deer" dog hunters in your state (if dog hunting is allowed) for their rejects. This may sound kind of dumb on the surface, but most dog hunters are looking for the fast - "full out" dogs to run deer. Most of the time they would cull the slow dogs that can't keep up. If you sort through a few of these you will eventually find one with a good nose and a "low-key" temperament that should fit your needs nicely. I had a walker/bloodhound mix a few years back that served me well in tracking wounded deer (long muzzle loader season in my state - that is a whole other gripe). The whole key to what you are looking for is a good nose with a low-key personality (i.e. SLOW). Their is nothing quite like being pulled through the bushes and briars at 10:00 pm by some hyped up dog that can't figure out if he is following the deer you shoot or the rabbit you just scared!

If the larger dogs don't work out, I have herd that beagles are pretty good if trained correctly.

Good Luck!

Bye the way, if dog hunting is not popular in your state, let me know. I can give you the names of several people with more dogs than your local SPCA.
 

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Tracking
The Detector Dog Unit tracks for people who might be lost in the woods or criminals who are wanted by the law. Since a great deal of the tracking that these dogs do is in the woods, tracking in the Fall requires extreme care because of hunting season. The handlers use blaze orange collars and vests for both dogs and dog handler. In addition, 30 ft. blaze orange tracking leads are used to heighten visibility. Using dogs in this type of enforcement has been beneficial. Not only have the dogs aided in locating subjects hunting illegally, but they have also caught hunters baiting deer illegally, hunters with no licenses, no bow stamps, or using other hunters' tags. Without the dogs, these early season stands would be difficult, if not impossible, to locate.





Statutory Authority: ECL 11-0928 and 6 NYCRR Part 176 and Part 175
The Leashed Tracking Dog License authorizes qualified individuals to use certified leashed tracking dogs to track and find dead, wounded or injured big game. This is a five year license and there is a $25.00 application/ processing fee.

To apply for this license, contact the Division of Fish, Wildlife and Marine Resources Special Licenses Unit.

Special Licenses Unit
NYSDEC
625 Broadway
Albany, NY 12233-4752
(518)402-8985

[COLOR=Red]this is for NY but maybe it will help.[/COLOR]
 

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For some good information go to www.thetroutbum.com look under the dog section and go to the message board. This is a site just for blood tacking and you can get lots of great information there. John Jeanneney has a book for sale on there called Tracking dogs for wounded deer. This is a great read for anybody wanting to get into tracking wounded game. I have a Bavarian mountain hound that I work off a 30' lead here in Ga. This is a specialty breed out of Europe that was developed with the sole intent to track wounded game, they have a very good cold nose for old though tracks. There are other great breeds out there that work and Scottd the drathaars are definetly one of them for sure. I have been training with a group of Drathaar breeders and have been impressed with what these dogs can do. I only hunt big game and do not normal get out to hunt birds so I did not need a dog that big or that could point, retrieve on land or in water, but if you do these are a very good dog. They seem to have a very good nose for tracking also. If you are up north the wirehaired dachshund makes a good tracking dog, slow and deliberate.
 

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Thanks Wildlands. Been preaching for years about the versitilaty of the breed. Most people seem to only want a one type breed.

And I agree whole heartedly about the Wire Dacshound. Friends had several. Didn't mention them for the cynics would of for sure that I was off my rocker.

Do you have a picture of your Bavarian mountain hound?
 

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You wouldn't be pulling my leg would ya. Sure looks just like a Dachshound, though I can see the rest of the body. But I swear!
 

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She is what she is. I am having trouble uploading a better picture of her. Keeps telling me that the page can not be found. She is 17 1/2 tall, 18 months old and weighs right at 40 pounds. When it will let me I will upload a better picture.
 

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Cant go wrong with a good old bloodhound. They are used by a lot of prison departments to track escaped prisoners. Most deer dogs will not track a wounded deer that is bleeding. I would contact my closest corrections department and inquire about their dog handlers. You might can aquire one from them. As for training it to track a wounded deer, the best way to teach it is to shoot a deer and drag him through the thickest woods you can find for several hundred yards and cover him with leaves. Go and get the dog and put him on the track. A good dog wont have to be trained. He will go right to the deer.
 

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Sniper762...wouldn't your state Probation Officer know? (he, he he he...just kidding, of course). LOL
 

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Deergrower did you ever settle on a breed of dog to track wounded game with? I have noticed that you posted the same question on several hunting forums.
 
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