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For all you reloaders out there....
Just acquired a new measuring device, a Mitutoyo 2416S dial indicator matched with a Mitutoyo 7033B magnetic stand (see picture below). For years ahead they should come in handy for a variety of projects, but particularly interested in how they may be used to improve shooting accuracy. Opening up this thread to hear how Gun’n Gamers may be using similar measuring tools to help improve reloading and shooting accuracy. Some products come with their own dial indicator set-up, such as the 21st Century Concentricity Gauge, the K&M Force Pack, the Redding Instant Indicator, etc., but think it would be more interesting to learn about your homemade measuring set-up using a dial indicator to augment reloading accuracy. Got some great ideas to share? (pics would also be very helpful)
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In handloading you can check bullet run out , as well as case concentricity at various points on the case. You may need some other items to accomplish all of this but the gauge and its set up are a good start. You may want to look for a .0001" read indicator as well..they are available and deals can be found. A good quality V-block would be helpful...
 

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Standard micrometer and digital gauge (both bought from Dillon) have served me well--as has their SDB setup which throws powder (at least with universal) very consistently. I haven't had to alter the calibration on the powder bar hardly at all since I got it where I wanted it. I think a digital scale is quite a boon, but the balance beams one work too.

With the progressive, I just start by running a bunch of empties through the powder station and get a starting average as well as variation between loads for maybe 10 rounds or so. If it looks good (which it has so far) I let 'r rip and pull an occasional cartridge from the bullet seating station every now and again to QC. I also do a gross error check on the powder level before seating the bullet.

A small mirror would be helpful there because the powder level is at a funky angle to view and sometimes hard to see. But with the loads and universal powder I've never had an issue.

The Lee powder scoops work quite well for the rifle cartridges (I weigh each on the Dillon digital scale which is portable and can be battery powered). It's REALLY close using RL-7 with the scoop that comes with the die set and I can trickle from the scoop. They also make a cheap (12 dollar) set of volumetric scoops and have a paper powder slide rule thing for different charges.
 
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