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i acquired 2 disassemble Mauser receivers, all the wood for both just no barrels, I’m looking to sell them, I’m just not sure where to sell them and if it’s legal too sell complete disassembled receivers, if I’m okay to sell them could anyone tell me the best place to do so or maybe someone on here would be interested, one is a 1895 manufactured in Loewe Berlin that shoots 8mm And the others a Ankara k. Kalf 1941 that shoots 7mm not sure on the value of on these, if anyone could lead me in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated
 

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I am cornfused! Disassembled receivers do not have bolts, triggers or trigger guards with magazines!
 

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I'm guessing that those would be Chilean and Turkish Mauser receivers :) . You can sell them and someone can correct me if I'm mistaken but even though those are completely disassembled receivers they're still finished receivers so you'd have to have your local FFL dealer ship them to someone else's FFL dealer that wants to buy them where they would go through the process of filling out a form 4473 and being approved to pick them up. As far as the older Chilean Mauser receiver goes I think you may be able to ship it to someone's house if they have a terio and Relic (C&R) liscense because it's over 100 years old. I would do a general search on GunBroker 4 Chilean Mauser receiver and Turkish Mauser receiver and then go to Advanced Search and checking the completed listings to get a better idea of what they may go for, unfortunately I don't think they'll be worth too much but then again I could be wrong.
 
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I just saw a 38 K Kale barreled receiver on Gunbroker. It had the "buy it now" option for $120.00. It was a stripped rec, the barrel had the front sight, and rear base. You should reassemble what you have, and sell them as complete assembled actions.

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Both receivers can be sent to an FFL or someone with a C&R License. The 95 and the Turk Ankara K. Kale usually don't go for as much as other Mauser actions. They are less sought after. I collect Mauser rifles and parts and very familiar with them. Are you sure the K. Kale is 7mm. Many were 8mm large ring action and have small ring barrel threads. I have barreled quite a few and built sporter rifles on those actions.
 

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I'm guessing that those would be Chilean and Turkish Mauser receivers :) . You can sell them and someone can correct me if I'm mistaken but even though those are completely disassembled receivers they're still finished receivers so you'd have to have your local FFL dealer ship them to someone else's FFL dealer that wants to buy them where they would go through the process of filling out a form 4473 and being approved to pick them up. As far as the older Chilean Mauser receiver goes I think you may be able to ship it to someone's house if they have a terio and Relic (C&R) liscense because it's over 100 years old. I would do a general search on GunBroker 4 Chilean Mauser receiver and Turkish Mauser receiver and then go to Advanced Search and checking the completed listings to get a better idea of what they may go for, unfortunately I don't think they'll be worth too much but then again I could be wrong.

If they actually are Chilean or Turkish then they would most likely be antiques. The Chilean Mausers should be marked "Loewe Berlin" and were made before 1895, making them antiques and therefore no license would be needed. The Turkish Mauser has a roughly 90% chance of falling into the same category. The original contract was completed before 1898 even if the receivers are marked "193_ Ankara," with one exception. There were some late model carbines and rifles which had receivers actually made by Ankara in 1938, but you can look up the markings on these and pick them out from the others.
 

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The Chilean should be marked Ludwig Loewe and if a Model 1895 should have been made after 1895 and not before. Unless you can prove the year manufactured you still have to have at least a Curio&Relic license to buy. If not sure than look at the receiver for the year. If you have the complete actions or receivers with bolt and trigger and trigger guard then you can get up to $150 max. Usually about $125 each
 

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No cuts or welds anywhere in the receiver to prevent it's return as a firearm? If so, yeah it would be legal. It's a working receiver that's a no no. You could only sell it then to a 001 License holder.
 
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The Chilean should be marked Ludwig Loewe and if a Model 1895 should have been made after 1895 and not before. Unless you can prove the year manufactured you still have to have at least a Curio&Relic license to buy. If not sure than look at the receiver for the year. If you have the complete actions or receivers with bolt and trigger and trigger guard then you can get up to $150 max. Usually about $125 each
It could not have been made any later than 1896 no matter what, as the factory became DWM after that. You do not need a curio and relic license for this as the ATF considers it an antique. They even have that exact rifle as one of their examples of an antique rifle in their official literature. No C&R is necessary, and if you don't believe me take it up with the ATF and tell them their literature is wrong.
 

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Crap, I forgot the 100 year rule. Though that means there are a lot of 1911's out there that should be classified antique.
 
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Unless you live in a state or country that outlaws such transactions, you can sell it, in person, to anyone that can legally own it.

If I didn't know much about them.
1) Put them back together, so I could see what I had.
2) Do some research on how to inspect vintage firearms. 3) Take them to a gun show, and find out what they're charging for similar items, in similar shape, and decide what I would take.

Who am I kidding, I'd build a 250-3000, 7x57mm or 6.5x55mm rifle using the 95, and a 338-06, 35 Whelen, 30-06, or any of a dozen more options with the 98. The hard part for me is deciding what to build.

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Crap, I forgot the 100 year rule. Though that means there are a lot of 1911's out there that should be classified antique.

It isn't a 100 year rule, though one senator was trying to get that passed. It is the pre-1898 law: https://www.atf.gov/firearms/firear...rms-national-firearms-act-definitions-antique

The part that has always confused me about the law, and which no ATF agent has ever been able to successfully explain to me is the part about ammunition not available through regular commercial channels or produced in the U.S.. By that definition there are almost no pre-1898 fixed-ammo weapons that could be considered antique.

Even stranger is that there are literally hundreds of .22 rifles, 45-70 rifles, 45 Colts and Schofields, .38 S&W, 38-40, 7mm Mauser, 7.65 mm Argentine, and 30-40 Krag guns out there for which ammunition can be found at nearly any gun shop and a lot of box stores.
 

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It isn't a 100 year rule, though one senator was trying to get that passed. It is the pre-1898 law: https://www.atf.gov/firearms/firear...rms-national-firearms-act-definitions-antique

The part that has always confused me about the law, and which no ATF agent has ever been able to successfully explain to me is the part about ammunition not available through regular commercial channels or produced in the U.S.. By that definition there are almost no pre-1898 fixed-ammo weapons that could be considered antique.

Even stranger is that there are literally hundreds of .22 rifles, 45-70 rifles, 45 Colts and Schofields, .38 S&W, 38-40, 7mm Mauser, 7.65 mm Argentine, and 30-40 Krag guns out there for which ammunition can be found at nearly any gun shop and a lot of box stores.

Forget that second part. I found where the ATF clarified that any weapon made before 1898 is an antique regardless of caliber, but that the ammunition rule applies only to replicas or guns made after that time.

"Thank you for your recent inquiry to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF). This is in response to your email in which you inquired about the term Antique firearms.

As defined in 18 U.S.C. § 921(a)(16) the term “antique firearm” means —
A. any firearm (including any firearm with a matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap, or similar type of ignition system) manufactured in or before 1898; OR
B. any replica of any firearm described in subparagraph (A) if such replica —
i. is not designed or redesigned for using rimfire or conventional centerfire fixed ammunition, or
ii. uses rimfire or conventional centerfire fixed ammunition which is no longer manufactured in the United States and which is not readily available in the ordinary channels of commercial trade; or
iii. any muzzle loading rifle, muzzle loading shotgun, or muzzle loading pistol, which is designed to use black powder, or a black powder substitute, and which cannot use fixed ammunition. For purposes of this subparagraph, the term ‘antique firearm’ shall not include any weapon which incorporates a firearm frame or receiver, any firearm which is converted into a muzzle loading weapon, or any muzzle loading weapon, which can be readily converted to fire fixed ammunition by replacing the barrel, bolt, breechblock, or any combination thereof.

The way this definition is to be read is that if the firearm was manufactured (e.g. made, completed NOT started production) on or before 1898, then it is considered to be an antique firearm. OR if the firearm is a replica (no matter the year it was manufactured) and the ammunition used is no longer available through commercial channels, then that firearm is considered to be an antique.

Based on your email, and applying the above definition, if you have a firearm manufactured in 1903 and used ammunition no longer available through commercial channels, then your firearm would have an antique status.

We trust the foregoing has been responsive to your inquiry. Should you have additional questions, please contact your local ATF office. A listing of ATF office phone numbers can be found athttp://www.atf.gov/content/contact-us/local-atf-office

Regards,
Rinell Lawrence
Firearms Industry Programs Branch, ATF"
 
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