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I have come to realize how much I dislike black synthetic stocks; two of my shotguns have them. It doesn’t bother me when I’m using them. But when I look at them hanging in the rack next to the wood ones, I think, “Man those are ugly”. I have even thought of painting them. I could get rid of them, but they are good guns. I guess it’s like driving a Ford and you’re a Chevy man.
 

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I gotta admit that I derive great glee in loathing synthetic stocks.

Synthetic stocks have some advantages. They are low maintenance and can lend stability characteristics for the enhancement of dependable accuracy.

They're just so nasty looking though and an offense to the eye!

I'll put up with walnut.
 

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I agree, they are ugly, but when I'm shooting a rifle for accuracy, I much prefer a synthetic stock. Now it has to be a good one, but all of my (non former military) rifles have them. Also, I'm hard on my guns so when I ding one of my wood stocks it makes me cry.
 

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Depends on which kind of gun it's on.

Synthetics are fine for a working shotgun used in a critter gitter or HD or SD role.

I find some of the stock lengths too long and an M4-like adjustable/collapsible better depending on mission.

I like some fine looking wood too and on the coach guns it looks nice. As it does on the levers and M1s. But on bang up guns synthetics seem to hold up better and I don't feel bad when they get torn up a bit.

So for me it comes down to purpose.
 

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I am old school and like a fine wood stock particularly in black walnut. I however have quite a few Black rifles with the plastic hardware. Ii sort of view them different though as a survival rifle and like the plastic. I also have a few muzzle loaders and a Savage shotgun with plastic stock with the tactical look. I have a few plastic stocks on custom Mauser rifles I built but I camo painted them
 

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I agree, they are ugly, but when I'm shooting a rifle for accuracy, I much prefer a synthetic stock. Now it has to be a good one, but all of my (non former military) rifles have them. Also, I'm hard on my guns so when I ding one of my wood stocks it makes me cry.
Dings in a wooden stock are called character marks, just means it's been used, not necessarily abused
 

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I'm against them for purely aesthetic reasons. I, too, like them for field work.

My .308 Hunting rifle is that ugly green that the Ruger American Predators come in. Looks terrible, but it is unbelievably accurate with off the shelf ammo...
My hunting shotgun has a stupid camo plastic stock. Looks like crap, but it doesn't scratch or show wear.
My hunting .22 has a stupid camo skeletonized plastic stock. Looks like crap, but it doesn't scratch or show wear.

All three of the stocks are lighter than wood would be, which isn't a big deal until you're a mile in with 3 or more thousand-foot elevation changes involved, at which point ounces add up. I also don't have to worry about weather changes pressing on the action or barrel with any of these.

It's a trade-off for sure. I just wish the plastic looked better.
 

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Oh I love the appearance of a fine quality wooden stock with some gorgeous bluing, but the practical part of me greatly appreciates the functionality and the constant repeatability of a good quality synthetic or composite stock and a durable matte finish of some sort on the metal. Virtually unaffected by handling, hauling, extremes of heat & cold, conditions varying from monsoons to arid desert droughts, etc for my lifetime and far beyond.
 

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The only thing I use synthetic stocks for is reclaiming Bubba'd rifles. It makes them functional again without spending a fortune. The days when you could find Boyds aftermarket walnut stocks on eBay for cheap are LONG past!
 

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I have no issues with a well designed synthetic stock, my Beretta 1201 has a well thought out synthetic stock design. It offers excellent cheek weld and put you right on the iron sights...I replaced the synthetic stocks on my .223 Savage Edge with a Boyd's laminate. I like to use the rifle sling for steadiness and on the Edge I could see the stock moving when pressure was applied to the sling...that could effect accuracy and/or change point of impact. I have probably switched out 4 stocks from polymer to laminate due to the "polymer being bendy", I did on my .243 Mossberg, .308 Mossberg...I have switched a wooden Mini-14 to the Hogue overmold and I like it much better than the slippery wooden stock piece of birch. I will probably redo the stock and add some stippling in the needed areas.The Mini-14 stock as issued leaves a bit to be desired and this one is a retired prison gun and obviously saw a bit of time in a tower and an outside patrol vehicle...I have a Marlin .223 heavy barrel varmint rifle that has a well designed polymer stock. It is reinforced and does not bend and it has traditional lines that offer good cheek weld and right at the low mounted scope level.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Maybe if they offered them in different colors besides black. like the Crickett's rifles do.

I did notice the rifle I'm looking at is 1/2 lighter in the synthetic stock version.
 

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If you look around there are very well made synthetic stocks that do not bend are light in weight and in any color you can think of. The cheap injection molded stocks tend to be too flexible; a good quality stock like an HS Precision, or a McMillan stock and there are a bunch of others out there too. They will be more expensive than a molded one but will offer many accuracy proven features.
Some are pillar bedded some have an aluminum chassis built into the stock...can't paint all synthetics with the same brush. Look around you'll see what I mean...
 
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If you look around there are very well made synthetic stocks that do not bend are light in weight and in any color you can think of. The cheap injection molded stocks tend to be too flexible; a good quality stock like an HS Precision, or a McMillan stock and there are a bunch of others out there too. They will be more expensive than a molded one but will offer many accuracy proven features.
Some are pillar bedded some have an aluminum chassis built into the stock...can't paint all synthetics with the same brush. Look around you'll see what I mean...
Ii am not much on the plastic stocks that come on these newer 22 rifles. Also after market stocks like the Butler Creek and others. I have used the Hogue and Mcmillan stocks which are composite but not plastic. They are more expensive and come in Pillar bed also. They are fiberglass and rubber outer . I used these on custom rifles I built to reduce weight. Thing is you can get them in so many finishes and patterns and colors.
 
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