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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seem to have always wanted a Webly in .455 Thinking of building a No 2 in .38. Someone displayed some Webly ammo at a gun show, very few to say, looked like something out of the French Revolution period. Question-is the .38 cal avalaible? Not near my cook books, would it be hard to convert another caliber casing to subsitute casing to subsitute for original. I would hate to build it to find out ammo is a no no. Thanks
 

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Seem to have always wanted a Webly in .455 Thinking of building a No 2 in .38. Someone displayed some Webly ammo at a gun show, very few to say, looked like something out of the French Revolution period. Question-is the .38 cal available? Not near my cook books, would it be hard to convert another caliber casing to subsitute casing to subsitute for original. I would hate to build it to find out ammo is a no no. Thanks
The Enfield No2 is not a Webley, they look alike but are not the same. The No.2 can be had in a couple of configurations. The No.2 which was capable of DA/SA firing and the No.2* which was DA-only. They are chambered in .38S&W which is readily available as loaded ammo and components are available as well. When you say
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I would hate to build it to find out ammo is a no no. Thanks
what do you plan on doing to it? I'd leave it alone as it is a fairly anemic load and the top break design doesn't allow any high pressure loads.
Here are a couple of pics of mine the top one is an Enfield No.2 bottom is a Webley Mark IV.

 

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I picked up an Enfield Model 2 Mark I** (...spurless hammer, no transfer bar) made by a Scotish Automaker in 1943 for $205 a few months ago.
 

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I picked up an Enfield Model 2 Mark I** (...spurless hammer, no transfer bar) made by a Scotish Automaker in 1943 for $205 a few months ago.
I just got around to taking this Enfield to the range. It was an interesting shoot. It shot well, but the little .38 Short(.38 x 200) wouldn't knock down the steel targets.

I'm thinking that the smartest thing a British Tank crew could do would be to STAY IN THE TANK!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Looks like I need to study more on the Webleys K75RT. I was not familiar that the No 2 took S&W short. I guess the bullet on display looked so old it threw me. I have read that the 455 Webley will accept the 45 acp with half/full noon clips. Is this correct. Always liked the 45 acp. carried it in my M1A1 Thompson and greaser in the Nam. Police dept. issued 45 S&W in 45 long colt. I carry the ole 1911A1 for self defense. One day I will!!!!! own a Webley in .455. I've reloaded for about 25 years and never/ever load anything hot. Strickly by the book.
 

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I just picked up a great little book off of Ebay for 14.50 GBP.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Will have to shop. Those 455s arn't cheap. Almost picked up a N02 at gun show.
 

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Originally the Enfield revolver came in .380 (not ACP) Enfield cartridge. The Geneva convention declared the round unsuitable for war-I think because it was a higher velocity round and did considerable damage. So they went with .38 S&W and so the Enfield revolver can shot both round types. I had one but the thing was never accurate beyond say 50 yards due to the .38S&W low velocity. Nice gun to shoot though and reliable and tough.
 

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I just picked up a great little book off of Ebay for 14.50 GBP.
This was an interesting read.

It seems the good folks at Webley & Scott had their design "hijacked" by the procurement folks.

It talks a lot about issues with the ammunition and the concerns regarding the Geneva convention. The concern was that they were afraid that the round nose lead bullet would flatten out on impact like a "dumb-dumb" bullet which was prohibited by the Geneva Convention.

After firing a box of .38 S & W through mine, I'm not really sure how on earth they considered it to have adequate stopping power; although, I understand that the .38/200 cartridge used by the British had a slightly heaver bullet. These were later sold commercially in the US as .38 S&W "Super Police".

It also analyzes the reason the Australian effort to produce the revolver was a failure.

As I said ... an interesting read.
 

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Originally the Enfield revolver came in .380 (not ACP) Enfield cartridge. The Geneva convention declared the round unsuitable for war-I think because it was a higher velocity round and did considerable damage. So they went with .38 S&W and so the Enfield revolver can shot both round types. I had one but the thing was never accurate beyond say 50 yards due to the .38S&W low velocity. Nice gun to shoot though and reliable and tough.

I think lots of guys on here would be happy with 50 yards accuracy!

I had both a .38 Enfield & a .455 Webley, and with either I would be hard pushed to hit a man sized target at 50 feet with them let alone 50 yards. (I can shoot fairly well with normal pistols) There was also a helluva difference in firing .38 S&W rather than the correct 200/380 round, it did pack quite a punch.
On another note my father in Law used the 200/.380 ammo in a single shot Rook rifle he had rechambered. It was his deer rifle for many years after the war and in use up until the 70's/80's. I don't know how many he took with it but I would estimate 5-10 every year and these are the large Scottish Red deer, but he was an expert stalker so most of the shots were probably taken at less than 70 yards.
 
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