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I understand the theory behind Faraday Cages, but what I don't understand is why? Let's say you do it right and build a great Faraday Cage. You put your family's cell phones in there and your walkie talkies, and maybe a tablet.....but here are my questions?


1. Do you think your gonna be soothsayer and know when that EMP is going to hit? I doubt it.
2. Do you think anyone else you'd hoped to call will have a Faraday Cage and have their equipment in it at the time of the EMP? Nope!
3. Say you put a radio in there and had it in at THE time. The 'radio' network is gonna get smashed by the EMP, so why bother?

The only thing that might work (and I'm not sure by any means) is if you had two walkie talkies in there, they might be able to pick up one another...from maybe a mile???
 

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I don't understand why people worry about an EMP.

1. The most likely cause of EMP is a nuke, and if that's the case its "Better learn yoga quick so I can KMA goodbye"
2. A mass online attack on our networks and banks has the same results, is cheaper, can be done without the kind of budget needed for a EMP or nuke attack, and our government has shown time and again that there will be no retaliation.
3. A random solar flare could knock us all into the 1950s, and there's nothing we could do about it.

I'm more worried about the Democrats destroying our technology and economy than I am an EMP. One is a reality, and the other is a hypothetical.
 

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Take a look at the wave of the future...
The Air Force Is Developing An 'EMP Missile' To Fry North Korea's Nukes

And what the other World Power is doing...

If you don't protect some electronic stuff, you will never know:
What time it is...
You will get to walk everywhere or ride a bike
Pace Makers kaput
Insulin pumps - nope...
Water Wells, electric pumps won't work so if you didn't have your well configured for a hand pump you will be thirsty
If you don't have books to educate, How-to, fix things, discuss natural remedies...you will suffer and your children/grand children will be uneducated.
And if you're afraid of the dark - too bad.

Get yourself some wind up watches to stash in the Faraday Cages you plan to build, and a couple of calendars so you will at least know when to celebrate Christmas.
 

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I don't understand why people worry about an EMP.

1. The most likely cause of EMP is a nuke, and if that's the case its "Better learn yoga quick so I can KMA goodbye"
2. A mass online attack on our networks and banks has the same results, is cheaper, can be done without the kind of budget needed for a EMP or nuke attack, and our government has shown time and again that there will be no retaliation.
3. A random solar flare could knock us all into the 1950s, and there's nothing we could do about it.

I'm more worried about the Democrats destroying our technology and economy than I am an EMP. One is a reality, and the other is a hypothetical.
This is about the size of it!
 

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Ah yes, the preparation for doomsday. If it really is truly doomsday then there is no preparation that will help. My philosophy about doomsday is quite simple;

I prefer to be directly beneath the god damned bomb.

"What's yer' favorite planet?? Mine's the Sun. When that baby blows we're ALL gonna' fry!!" Will Ferrell as Harry Carey on SNL.
 

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I talked to some engineers at Los Alamos nat. lab about en EMP attack. They said an EMP attack would take us back to 1880's. Considering the one year lead time for large sub-station transformers now, those would not be available after an EMP attack as they are built by computer control. Worried about an EMP attack, BUY A HORSE!
 

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Worried about an EMP attack, BUY A HORSE!
You have to feed and water a horse - I'll skip.
As far as giving up on life, not until the Good Lord calls me. I will adapt and press on. As people die off from giving up, I'll just occupy their land and raise food. Teach others how to raise food, make things, and start a really cool Hippie Commune and recolonize the planet. :unsure:
 

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3. A random solar flare could knock us all into the 1950s, and there's nothing we could do about it.
If we suffered an EMP from a solar flare and ONLY got knocked back into the 1950s, I'd be delighted. In the 1950s we still had AM and FM radio, electromechanical switching in the phone system, engines with no computerized anything in them, and hard-wired phones that were nowhere near as vulnerable to the effects of a solar flare as are cellphones.

But if we got a solar flare powerful enough to cause electromagnetic effects like the Carrington Event of 1859 or better, we'd be more likely to be knocked back into the 1880s. Think it through.

Almost all equipment made in the last 20 years has computer chips in it. The chips get fried. This knocks out phones, cars, modern aircraft - essentially, the entire transportation network ceases to work, except for some ships, probably the older ones that are on their last legs. 18-wheelers? Gone. Trains? Gone. Fly-by-wire air transports? Gone. You now have the problem of how to feed the urbanites when food can't be moved to where they are.

Most cars built after 1985 won't run because they all have onboard computers to get the engine to work efficiently. Anyone here ever see the episode of Fast 'n Loud where Richard Rawlings took the engine out of a 2015 Dodge Hellcat prototype and put it under the hood of a 1967 Dodge Dart? The Gas Monkeys had one helluva job to get the engine to run at all, because the Dart was analog and the Gen III V8 Hemi was computerized; and they had almost as much trouble getting the instruments in the cockpit to work, for the same reason. Any automobile with an engine control unit (read: computer) and electronic fuel injection ain't gonna run, because the ECU will be an ex-parrot. (One of the reasons I was so fond of my 1990 Mercedes 350SDL was she had an old-style mechanical fuel injection system that would still have worked in a post-EMP world.) The only vehicles that will work are the ones you see at old car shows, and you can't feed a city with those. The only locomotives that will run at first are the few preserved steam engines, and same comment. I predict the yankee gummint, if it can get its head out of its butt quickly, is going to go to the explorers of the abandoned and find out where the old diesel locomotive are moldering away and make it a priority to get them running again. It can be done; there are YouTube videos of old time railroad fans doing it, and with the resources of the yankee gummint it would not be hard. But it would not be waving a magic wand, either; it would take time. So we are back to the problem of feeding the useless mouths in the urban areas.

Modern containerships with slow-stroke marine diesels could still sail, though without radars and radios. So could tankers. The tankers could run their pumps and send the cargo into storage tanks ashore; everything there can be done by hand, no computers required. The containerships would have the problem of being dependent on shoreside cargo cranes, though I expect those could be hot-wired. The real problem would be getting the boxes off the dock and to where the cargo is needed.

In World War II, there were standard gauge railroad tracks on the docks to move the cargo right alongside the ships, which would take it aboard using their own cargo gear. I think some of those tracks still survive, so a switching engine could pull flatcars someplace where they could be either assembled into a consist a real locomotive could move to where they were needed, or into warehouses for unloading and shipment using the few trucks that still run. But the modern container berths built from the ground up after the Container Revolution knocked out the boomships don't have those tracks. They would have to be laid, and they would have to be tied into the existing rail network, and that would take time. Meanwhile, the city-dwellers are rioting, starving to death, and trying to overrun the rural folks who are doubtless shooting most of them dead. Not a pretty picture.

The United States in the 1880s had less than 10% of its population living in cities, and all the cities were immediately adjacent to farmlands. 90% of the population lived on farms. Most production was consumed locally, with the exception of grain and meat animals. Remember Carl Sandberg's poem, "Chicago"?

Hog Butcher for the World,
Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat,
Player with Railroads and the Nation's Freight Handler;
Stormy, husky, brawling,
City of the Big Shoulders.


But if Chicago had magically vanished a century ago, it would have been an annoyance, not a disaster. Cities like Cleveland, St. Louis, South Bend, and Buffalo could have taken up the slack in railroading and shipping wheat and flour; and with the advent of the reefer car cities in the hailstone and sarsaparilla belt could have become the new slaughterhouse city feeding the eastern United States. That is not the case today. 90% of Americans live in the cities. Everything depends on the existing transport systems continuing to run smoothly and continuously.

I remember reading in an economics class that no major city anywhere rarely has more than three or four days-worth of food for its population on hand. The cities depend on a continuous flow of food from outside the city limits. One example is the Berlin Airlift. For 15 months, the Western Allies supported the occupied city of West Berlin entirely by air, and broke the Soviet blockade that made the operation necessary. The daily average was 4,500 tons of cargo, with the record being just under 13,000 tons (a special stunt conceived by "Tonnage" Tunner, the mastermind of the Airlift). The city and its people survived ... with severe rationing of everything, including electricity and heat. I'm not sure how the complacent urbanites of today would react to a situation like that, which would be a distinct possibility in an EMP event. Realistically, I would expect food riots and a breakdown of social order within 10 days.

The world, never mind the United States, is not prepared for a major EMP event, whether caused by the detonation of a hydrogen bomb at high altitude, or a gigantic solar flare. It would be a major catastrophe, and just might kick off the Last World War as nations battled for resources, mostly food resources. Scary stuff.
 

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If we suffered an EMP from a solar flare and ONLY got knocked back into the 1950s, I'd be delighted. In the 1950s we still had AM and FM radio, electromechanical switching in the phone system, engines with no computerized anything in them, and hard-wired phones that were nowhere near as vulnerable to the effects of a solar flare as are cellphones.

But if we got a solar flare powerful enough to cause electromagnetic effects like the Carrington Event of 1859 or better, we'd be more likely to be knocked back into the 1880s. Think it through.

Almost all equipment made in the last 20 years has computer chips in it. The chips get fried. This knocks out phones, cars, modern aircraft - essentially, the entire transportation network ceases to work, except for some ships, probably the older ones that are on their last legs. 18-wheelers? Gone. Trains? Gone. Fly-by-wire air transports? Gone. You now have the problem of how to feed the urbanites when food can't be moved to where they are.

Most cars built after 1985 won't run because they all have onboard computers to get the engine to work efficiently. Anyone here ever see the episode of Fast 'n Loud where Richard Rawlings took the engine out of a 2015 Dodge Hellcat prototype and put it under the hood of a 1967 Dodge Dart? The Gas Monkeys had one helluva job to get the engine to run at all, because the Dart was analog and the Gen III V8 Hemi was computerized; and they had almost as much trouble getting the instruments in the cockpit to work, for the same reason. Any automobile with an engine control unit (read: computer) and electronic fuel injection ain't gonna run, because the ECU will be an ex-parrot. (One of the reasons I was so fond of my 1990 Mercedes 350SDL was she had an old-style mechanical fuel injection system that would still have worked in a post-EMP world.) The only vehicles that will work are the ones you see at old car shows, and you can't feed a city with those. The only locomotives that will run at first are the few preserved steam engines, and same comment. I predict the yankee gummint, if it can get its head out of its butt quickly, is going to go to the explorers of the abandoned and find out where the old diesel locomotive are moldering away and make it a priority to get them running again. It can be done; there are YouTube videos of old time railroad fans doing it, and with the resources of the yankee gummint it would not be hard. But it would not be waving a magic wand, either; it would take time. So we are back to the problem of feeding the useless mouths in the urban areas.

Modern containerships with slow-stroke marine diesels could still sail, though without radars and radios. So could tankers. The tankers could run their pumps and send the cargo into storage tanks ashore; everything there can be done by hand, no computers required. The containerships would have the problem of being dependent on shoreside cargo cranes, though I expect those could be hot-wired. The real problem would be getting the boxes off the dock and to where the cargo is needed.

In World War II, there were standard gauge railroad tracks on the docks to move the cargo right alongside the ships, which would take it aboard using their own cargo gear. I think some of those tracks still survive, so a switching engine could pull flatcars someplace where they could be either assembled into a consist a real locomotive could move to where they were needed, or into warehouses for unloading and shipment using the few trucks that still run. But the modern container berths built from the ground up after the Container Revolution knocked out the boomships don't have those tracks. They would have to be laid, and they would have to be tied into the existing rail network, and that would take time. Meanwhile, the city-dwellers are rioting, starving to death, and trying to overrun the rural folks who are doubtless shooting most of them dead. Not a pretty picture.

The United States in the 1880s had less than 10% of its population living in cities, and all the cities were immediately adjacent to farmlands. 90% of the population lived on farms. Most production was consumed locally, with the exception of grain and meat animals. Remember Carl Sandberg's poem, "Chicago"?

Hog Butcher for the World,
Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat,
Player with Railroads and the Nation's Freight Handler;
Stormy, husky, brawling,
City of the Big Shoulders.


But if Chicago had magically vanished a century ago, it would have been an annoyance, not a disaster. Cities like Cleveland, St. Louis, South Bend, and Buffalo could have taken up the slack in railroading and shipping wheat and flour; and with the advent of the reefer car cities in the hailstone and sarsaparilla belt could have become the new slaughterhouse city feeding the eastern United States. That is not the case today. 90% of Americans live in the cities. Everything depends on the existing transport systems continuing to run smoothly and continuously.

I remember reading in an economics class that no major city anywhere rarely has more than three or four days-worth of food for its population on hand. The cities depend on a continuous flow of food from outside the city limits. One example is the Berlin Airlift. For 15 months, the Western Allies supported the occupied city of West Berlin entirely by air, and broke the Soviet blockade that made the operation necessary. The daily average was 4,500 tons of cargo, with the record being just under 13,000 tons (a special stunt conceived by "Tonnage" Tunner, the mastermind of the Airlift). The city and its people survived ... with severe rationing of everything, including electricity and heat. I'm not sure how the complacent urbanites of today would react to a situation like that, which would be a distinct possibility in an EMP event. Realistically, I would expect food riots and a breakdown of social order within 10 days.

The world, never mind the United States, is not prepared for a major EMP event, whether caused by the detonation of a hydrogen bomb at high altitude, or a gigantic solar flare. It would be a major catastrophe, and just might kick off the Last World War as nations battled for resources, mostly food resources. Scary stuff.
Oh, WE'D probably get kicked back much further, but Russia still has pretty recent technology running on vacuum tube, and SE Asia still hasn't forgotten how to do things without technology, and Cuba and India would barely register a change.

Basically all the developing nations would hit between the 1930s and 1950s. Former and current Communist countries that have been slow to change would be in the 1970s, or even their version of the early 90s (a friend of mine bought an early 90s Russian HiFi with a CD player and everything STILL runs on tubes and switches).

Western Europe and America would be back to the 19th Century, but without the relevant skills.

The worst hit would be the rich Middle Eastern countries. Suddenly their militant, Jihadi neighbors might have an advantage. I imagine that they would revert to largely medieval standards - but more like Europe in the middle ages than Islam.
 

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Buy a galvanized trash can with lid, drill a small hole in the lid and upper end below where the lid seats on the can and install grounding cables. Add a clip to the end so you can hook it to a ground point. Then line the inside of the can with a couple of cardboard sheets around the side and base. That way, anything you place in the Farady Cage will not be touching metal directly. There you have it. The reason for the grounding cable is so the can won't arc in the house and could cause a fire. Watch this video and you will understand it's not difficult to protect some things. Don't need to crawl inside unless you have a pace maker installed.

 

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Anyone ever been to one of those places where they set up Tesla coils and you can volunteer to sit in a Faraday cage?
Yeah. Years ago (25+) in a different career I worked in Silicon Valley and my wife and I lived in SF proper. The Exploratorium museum in SF had a Faraday Cage demo setup. Pretty cool. They also had many other >science< experiments and demos you could play with. Of course, that was when science was based on facts and before Cali went completely bat54i7 crazy.
 
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