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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

When I initially bought my Mosin M44 carbine, I figured it would have good accuracy potential as it's a bolt action.

Though it's good at what it does, I doubt I'll ever shoot it better than 1" at 100yds, and that's rested with a 'scope and all, and with the bayonet removed. I figure I have a chance then. I've only broken 2" at that distance, and only achieved that once. On a good day. When all the stars were aligned. Rested.

This morning I decided to go see what this weather dumped on us. I usually take a long gun with me as my Taurus is not as accessible with a heavy coat or gloves. Though I try not to wear gloves, they do become a necessity after it drops into the 20s.

The Beretta/Taurus design is a good one for use with gloves, but it's actually getting it in hand that's a challenge, and I don't like the time involved. So I usually carry a rifle.

My Romanian 1969 trainer usually gets that honor, but being a five shot .22, it is a little underpowered for me. The shotgun is just too heavy and not worked over for foul weather anyway.

So, I grabbed the M44 and four rounds of soft point 203gr ammo. I figured that stuff could handle anything that may need handling, and it's the stuff that shoots best from my barrel.

I donned a camo head net that I just bought, and some nice, thick camo gloves. They go well with the camo coat I've had for years.

The head net did a good job at keeping me from inhaling the sleet that was coming down, and the gloves were very warm.

I was absolutely thrilled at the way the M44 handled. While it feels clumsy when shooting in the summer, it dawned on me that this thing was set up for the fine motor impairment which comes with a reduced sense of touch. The safety worked perfectly, the straight bolt handle didn't pinch the glove material between the knob and stock like my M1969 with its turned-down handle does at times, and the trigger guard allows ample room for the thickest of gloved fingers to operate the trigger. Even the sights are more conducive to cold weather - I aimed into the wind, and even with my eyes tearing, I could make out a rough sight picture that would have dropped a deer or a Nazi out to about 100yds.

I loaded it, and loading cartridges singly was not a problem. I was even able to easily operate the door on the bottom of the magazine with the gloves in place when I was ready to unload it again.

This is hands-down the most friendly cold weather firearm I've ever handled, and I think that it will become my knocking around gun for the duration of the winter, unless I'm intentionally going after something that requires less power, like small game.

Josh <><
 

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Jeezo pete Josh, every forum I go to I see you there today!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well Gando, I'm signed up with just about all of them. Christmas break from college combined with a near-blizzard snow storm have me cooped up and bored.

Josh <><
 

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Retired IT Dinosaur Wrangler
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Josh, between "General Winter" and the Mosin-toting Russky soldaten, the Nazis stood little chance! :eek:wned2:

The Finns knew a good thing when they saw it too. :)
 

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Gotta love those Mosins!! :)

*****************************************************
All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing
 

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...and this is why it's always on the list of TOP 10 SHTF GUNS. :wink1:
 

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Russian Design Philosophy

From what I can tell, the Russians have the same design philosophy when it comes to weapons as Starkist does to tuna fish: they don't want weapons that look nice, they want weapons that shoot good. The Moisin-Nagant and its derivative M44; the SKS; the AK-47. None of them are pretty. In terms of aethethics, they don't make the grade. But any one of them will keep right on shooting in conditions that would make any post-M14 US battle rifle, adopted or proposed, stop working. Not an opinion; simple fact.

In my opinion, this puts them light-years ahead of the US Army jerks that have spent uncounted millions coming up with gimcracks and add-ons that desperately try to correct the inherent problems of the M16 and its derivative M4 carbine, and ditto the 9mm service pistol that politics forced on the Army instead of the reliable and man-stopping M1911A1. American weapons designers could learn an awful lot by studying the design philosophies of Moisin, Nagant, Simonov and Kalashnikov - and John Browning and John Garand, too.

It's why my first .30 caliber rifle was an SKS, and why I'll be buying an M44 as soon as I can find a good one. It's not that I have anything against US-made weapons like the M-1 Carbine or the Garand or the Springfield; I just can't afford them right now. I can buy a lot of ammo for the difference in price between a Garand and an SKS. It's all very well to have a classic rifle, but it's even nicer if you can afford to shoot it regularly.
 

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Well Gando, I'm signed up with just about all of them. Christmas break from college combined with a near-blizzard snow storm have me cooped up and bored.

Josh <><
I'm cooped up from a total knee replacement, so I hear ya.
 

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The Moisin-Nagant and its derivative M44; the SKS; the AK-47. None of them are pretty. In terms of aethethics, they don't make the grade.
Though we all know it's a matter of opinion, I respectfully disagree on all counts. I believe the 91/30 sniper is a gorgeous rifle and very balanced visually. Same goes for the Tabuk sniper rifle; essentially a long-barreled AK with a skeletonized buttstock. Then there's the ROMAK-3/FPK/PSL which, as we all know from the stickied thread, is really an AK in 7.62x54R caliber... that thing's just got SEXY written all over it.

I think there's something to be said for "battle-ready aesthetics" that most people seem to look over.
 

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I wholeheartedly agree with JAC! Beauty is after all, in the eye of the beholder.
You have a typo as well Cyrano, that should be "not a fact; simple opinion". I also believe Mosin, Simonov et al, would b quite amazed at the simplicity and engineering of Mr Stoner's design which borrowed many design features from great weapons from around the world! Me thinks you should do some more reading and fire these rifles, before making such broad statements.
 

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I wholeheartedly agree with JAC! Beauty is after all, in the eye of the beholder.
You have a typo as well Cyrano, that should be "not a fact; simple opinion". I also believe Mosin, Simonov et al, would b quite amazed at the simplicity and engineering of Mr Stoner's design which borrowed many design features from great weapons from around the world! Me thinks you should do some more reading and fire these rifles, before making such broad statements.
+ 1
 

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While I agree with you fellows for the most part about the M44's ease of cold weather handling, I have to admit that the only problem I had with mine when I did my rapid fire video was that I had to re shoot the scene twice because in my attempt to rapid fire it, my glove got caught in the bolt twice, with almost disastrous results. I finally took my gloves off in order to complete the attempt. Fingerless gloves may have prevailed in this case...and before anybody can say anything...I was shooting to hit my target, and I did hit my target 3 out of 5 times. I can't help but wonder if field soldiers had the same problem with their gloves, or if they wore specially designed gloves to shoot their Mosins. Surely they were engaged in rapid firing of their weapons and not watching the bolt every shot. One thing for certain. I won't wear loose fitting gloves when I shoot my M44 again.
 

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Ewwwwww.....glove goulash. :yuck:
 
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