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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This barreled action was purchased about 30 years ago when I bought a bunch of "Gunsmith Specials" from a now defunct local gunshop. I got a bunch of M-N magazines, bolt parts, and a handful of barreled actions with no wood or metal fittings for the wood furniture. I socked them away and sold off a bunch of stuff but I remember looking at this rifle and thinking it needs work as parts are broken and/or missing. I did a cursory search and determined it is in fact a Finnish Model 28, the same model rifle Simho Hayha carried. I looked around for parts for a M28 and they are not readily available and the special parts I needed I was unable to find.
The parts that were missing/broken and needed to be repaired were the bolt handle and the cockkingpiece. Both had sustained damage probably in a warehouse environment. The bolt handle was mangled and at the time it looked like a recent issue, dragged by a forklift, happened during shipping....anyones guess. The cockkingpiece was damaged as well, yet it came off the bolt ass'y with no binding and the firing pin wasn't damaged, I checked it in a V-block..I had a spare cockkingpiece and it was installed and the bolt handle was handled in a different manner. The ball of the handle is what saw the brunt of the damage, I decided to remove the handle but leave a .125" shoulder to indicate off of. It was centered in the mill and it was drilled and reamed to about .006" bigger than the new and longer rounded handle. I tinned the shank of the new handle and fluxed the reamed hole. I used an Oxy-02 setup and it worked well. I used some old silvaloy and comet flux from Brownells.
About 8-1/2 years ago I found a Boyds Prairie Hunter hardwood stock for $54, I bought it and it sat. They claimed the stock would fit Finnish military barrel contours, nope! and the bottom metal(magazine) needed some opening. The barrel extension on the Neuhaussen barrel is thicker and will need to be fit the barrel channel is too narrow and will need to be opened up as well. I took some pictures of the bolt with its new longer bolt handle and replacement cockkingpiece. As stated the barrel needs to be properly inlet but I included a picture of the rifle with the barrel sitting too high but you get the idea...
I know a lot of collectors and purists will wish this was a return to original; but it just was not possible, the nosecap was cut off, it was missing parts that are not readily available. If I could have I would have. The barrel and sights are still intact as is the trigger assembly with the "mouse-trap-spring" and bellville washer. The trigger pull is awesome.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
These are a very interesting variant of the M91 series, found this over at RMN...
The M28 was an upgrade to the Finnish Army M27 and the replacement for the Civil Guard's M24. With the Finnish Army adopting the M27, the Finnish Civil Guard, Suojeluskunta, or White Guard, took the Army's M27 and made some minor design changes, resulting in the M28. The rifle's acceptance was finalized in 1928. Regardless of the barrel manufacture, all M28s were assembled in the Sako factory, Sujeluskuntien Ase-Ja Konepaja Osakeyhtio. Due to the limited numbers manufactured, loss, Finnish conversions, and the attrition rates during the Winter War, the Continuation War, and the Lapland War, the M28 is one of the more rare variants of Finnish rifles. SIG Barrel: produced from 1928 until 1930 and again in 1932. These barrels were made by the Swiss firm "SIG", Schweizerische Industrie-Gessellschaft. Manufacturer's marking is in script located below the wood line. The barrel is dated, a small square is stamped with a 27, 28 or a 29 inside of it, it is located on the bottom of the barrel shank. An estimated 20,000 M28s had these barrels.
The Rear Sight
  • The sight base, a modified Konovalov style, was calibrated and re-stamped in meters on the right side, it had an extra step added for a 200 meter battle sight. The Russian arshin was commonly stamped out.
  • The M28's rear sight plate has 2 screws attaching the plate from the bottom. The M27 had 2 screws attaching the plate from the rear of the sight.
  • The M28's sight groove is “U” shaped, while the M27 had a V-cut sight plate.
  • The "protective ears" of the M27's rear sight, which, from all accounts, is to help prevent side impact damage, are not present on the M28.
The Front Sight
The front sight is drift adjustable, the blade is dovetailed in the base, it is equipped with “protective ears” much like the M27.
  • The front sight bases of the M27 and the M28 look very much the same, but there is a minor difference: they are installed differently, the small set screw that holds it is front-facing on the M28, while the same style set screw is rear-facing on the M27.
Trigger
The M28 maintained a similar trigger design as the M24, using a coil spring (commonly called "mouse trap spring") to help improve the trigger pull and assist with the overall accuracy.

Markings
The oval shaped SYT stamp is generally located in the right side finger grooves. This is the Civil Guard acceptance marking indicating a successful M91 stock conversion. All barrels will have 2 to 3 =S= stamps that also show Civil Guard acceptance. It is common to find a <-(KE)-> stamp, which is the inspector's initials stamp, "Kosti Eakola". Other inspector stamps are known to have been used, usually just a single letter. Civil Guards' district numbers are stamped on the right side barrel, identifying the district it was initially issued in. Some rifles have been found with 2 district stamps, with the first being lined out. The left side contains the rifle serial number. SIG- and Tikka-produced barrels are stamped with an "SY" stamp indicating the Civil Guard designation. In October 1944, the Civil Guard was disbanded and all Civil Guard arms were then turned over to the regular army, which is why many M28s will have the [SA] stamping.

It is too bad that my rifle is not complete at issued, it is now a sporter but the metal fittings have not been altered with the exception of the bolt handle and the cockkingpiece/safety. I inlet the stock today and she fits nicely...Next is to pillar bed and glass bed the action...
 

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I know a lot of collectors and purists will wish this was a return to original; but it just was not possible,
Collectors be damned (at least in this case). You took a rifle that could no longer do what it was designed to do and returned it to service. You now have a fine looking rifle that you can enjoy. Nicely done. The collectors can have the next one.
 

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Have to hand it to the Nordic folk, they make some high quality firearms. Just to name a few: Sako is excellent from Finland (not to mention Sako's sidekick, Tikka). If you mortgage your home you might be able to afford a VO Vapen from Sweden (talk about a work of art!). Then there are the deadly Kongsberg Gruppen sniper mausers manufactured in Norway. And as if their rifles didn't bring enough renown, Denmark is where the famous Harkila brand of hunting equipment is made, and of course Finland is home to the incredible Savotta backpacks/rucksacks (for my money, the best on the planet). For such a small population area those Scandinavians are pretty danged amazing...
 

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That stock is almost too nice for the rifle. Good luck finishing it out, I look forward to a final report.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I got the inletting finished using chisels, gouges, scrapers and lamp soot. I had to remove a bit of wood as the barrel extension has a different profile than an M91/30. There is a taper and then it blends into the barrel. I used a small vinegar bottle with a slit cut in it for a flat wick, I put about a shot glass worth of lead birdshot into the bottom for ballast and add a small quantity of kerosine. Using the headless guidescrews I made to locate the stock repetitively, the area in question was smoked by the soot of the lamp and then put back into the stock, the areas that are sooted are removed and the process is repeated...Now I have to strip the metal of its finish and start the polishing...The stock is still in contact in a couple of areas but that is easily remedied if need be, the barrel now sits at about the right height in the stock. I plan on shooting it to see how it groups before doing any bedding work or pillar bedding.

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