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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Story that I am currently reading Birchbark was used as a cast for a broken arm. According to the story fresh bark was soaked and then wrapped around the broken limb and secured in place. As it dried it apparently hardened much like current day plaster casts would. Anybody ever hear of this technique?
 

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blue fox: Sir; continued 😁


K’i – Birch tree, our people used the sap of a birch tree for colds, pain and headache. The first layer closer to the tree under the birch bark is boiled and taken by the teaspoon for headache. (Not too much) We used the birch bark for “Tilh” birch baskets, for picking berries and cooking. Birch bark was also used for birch bark canoes. The paper of the birch tree was used by our native people to light fires. The birch tree bark was used for someone with a broken leg; the birch bark was used to set the broken bones. You take the top birch off a birch tree and set on the broken leg and set the birch on fire while it is on the leg and it should set as hard as a cast.
 

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I've had birch soda before. It's kind of like cream soda, only sweeter.

I'd like more information on how exactly the birch bark is prepared for use as a cast. Which layer(s) are used, and how they are overlapped to make the cast. Are there any diagrams or more detailed instructions out there for this? This is a piece of survival knowledge worth knowing.
 

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Story that I am currently reading Birchbark was used as a cast for a broken arm. According to the story fresh bark was soaked and then wrapped around the broken limb and secured in place. As it dried it apparently hardened much like current day plaster casts would. Anybody ever hear of this technique?
I've heard of using birch as a splint, wrapping with cloth or hide, and stiffening the wrap with acorn starch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've had birch soda before. It's kind of like cream soda, only sweeter.

I'd like more information on how exactly the birch bark is prepared for use as a cast. Which layer(s) are used, and how they are overlapped to make the cast. Are there any diagrams or more detailed instructions out there for this? This is a piece of survival knowledge worth knowing.
What I read was in a fictional story by Jean Auel. She did not go into much detail other than fresh birch bark being soaked, then put on and allowed to dry. I suspect that the fresh outer layers would be used for a cast. I have also read before that the inner layer (cambium?) is edible.
 

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The Tree Expert
One day two old trees noticed a young sapling starting to grow between them and the first tree commented I believe you have noticed that young sapling in the ground between us, can you happen to tell if it is a son of a beech or a son of a birch. The old second tree said I cannot tell if it is a son of a beech or a son of a birch but perhaps we can ask the woodpecker that sits in the tree on the other side of the trail.
So one of the trees called over to the woodpecker, Hey Mr. Woodpecker, you are a tree expert, can you tell us if that little sapling below is a son of a beech or a son of a birch. The woodpecker said he could not tell from his location but would fly down and check. So he did fly down and looked over the sapling and conducted a thorough inspection and flew up to discuss his findiings with the two old trees.
The woodpecker responded with bold authority - I can tell you both that the sapling is neither a son of a beech nor a son of a birch but it is the finest piece of ash I have ever put my pecker into.

In keeping with the OPs qustion about the usefulness and medicinal benefits of different woods, can anyone tell me what a piece of ash is good for?
I don't think Euell Gibbons is around any longer to chime in.
 

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Euell Gibbons!?? Candidate for "Most Obscure Reference of the Month" right there!! Well done!
He used to tell us about how good Grape Nuts tasted...like Wild Hickory Nuts.

Chef Duane...you have inadvertently disclosed how old you really are ;) so you grew up in the same era that Euell was on TV. I know you tried Grape Nuts just so you get an idea of what Wild Hickory Nuts tasted like. Well, are you still eating them????? I've got a box in the pantry....more for the fiber than for taste.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Interesting to see the thread drift here. I like it. I have read a lot of stuff that say most parts of cattails a safe to eat.
 

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Sunday, 14 August, is National Creamsicle Day. And I'm going to the grocery store later today and pick up a box of Creamsicles. AAArrrrghhhh, the Kroger's grocery store doesn't carry them, I will buy a pint of Orange Sherbet and a pint of French Vanilla ice cream and eat it in a bowl. My wife and daughter are on a diet, I'm not...more for me. 😋

On 15 August - Celebrate Chanting at the Moon Day - or howling if you would prefer. Invite the neighbors and make it a block party.

Wood plays an important part in both events....popsicle sticks, and you can beat sticks together while chanting. It will make you feel better...promise.
 

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He used to tell us about how good Grape Nuts tasted...like Wild Hickory Nuts.
Chef Duane...you have inadvertently disclosed how old you really are ;) so you grew up in the same era that Euell was on TV. I know you tried Grape Nuts just so you get an idea of what Wild Hickory Nuts tasted like. Well, are you still eating them????? I've got a box in the pantry....more for the fiber than for taste.
I have forgone the Grape Nuts and gone directly to whole psyllium husk with OJ in the morning. Gets the job done quicker!! I remember when that stuff generically called "granola" came out. Yes, I tell kids that I was born during the Eisenhower Administration. They think he was right after Lincoln! LOL!

Liquid Font Material property Poster Publication
 

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I'm rather skeptical. I have little doubt that you could construct a fairly effective splint from birch bark, but I'm not buying soaking it to form it. Birch bark is naturally waterproof. It is so water resistant that birch firewood will rot rather than season unless you split it, preferably into quarters. I grew up in birch country. We used it for fire starter, yes you can split the layers and use it for paper. The natives of course built canoes out of it. They also boiled water in it. You can form a pot, and the bark will transfer the heat to the water. The water will absorb enough heat to prevent the bark from catching fire.
Below is a link to a PDF listing was the natives used birch bark. Again, I don't see a way birch bark could be forced to take water.

 

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Answering a question raised earlier in the thread, ash wood is used for tool handles, from hand tools to rakes and shovels. The Native Americans, not having access to yew as did Robin Hood and his Merry Men, used ash to make their bows, because the wood is elastic. (By this, I mean it tolerates being deformed from its original shape when the bow is drawn, and then returns to its original shape when you release the arrow, the mechanical energy of the draw being transferred to the arrow via the bowstring.)
 
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