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Hello everyone! Every time I tried to find out anything about my flintlock, I found this source to be, by far, the most knowledgeable. If you all could help me find any more information about my family rifle, that would be amazing! Also, a rough value would be much appreciated!
History: purchased many years ago by my ancestors in North Carolina, been in the family since new.
Markings: Kingsland and Co. Warranted by the flintlock, LONDON written on the barrel, TK and some other makings on the barrel that I’m not sure about, AH written on stock.
General shape: trigger doesn’t work. Never attempted to touch it up in any way, very good overall condition.
 

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Is it a smoothbore?


There's just something about this that says Fowler to me. R. Kingsland & Co. is the lock maker. Their locks are not uncommon in either flintlock, or percussion.
 

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Early term for shotgun. Made to hunt fowl. There's no rear sight, is there, or am I just not seeing one. Smooth bore and no rear sight, combined with general stock shape says fowler to me.

It could be a smoothbore and still not be a fowler, and a rifled barrel precludes it being a fowler.

The other thing that says fowler to me is the shape of that flat butt plate. That is classic fowler shape.
 
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These were made from the mid 1830s until the early 1840s.

Kingsland made commercial locks which were used by gunmakers on both sides of the Atlantic.

I'm betting this is a smoothbore, roughly 75 caliber, based on the barrel markings, as this was also a commercial barrel used on both sides of the Atlantic.

Similar "Kingsland" muskets usually go for between $850 and $1,400 in this condition - towards the the higher price if a place of origin can be verified.

Beyond that I'm afraid I can't give you much information. It is a very basic Kentucky pattern long gun which could place its manufacture anywhere from Connecticut to Alabama to Illinois, or even in Britain.

After the War of 1812 the British got on a big kick of producing their own "Kentucky" clones, and the popular fiction of the 1830s and 1840s in Britain was full of American pioneers and "Red Indians" using their Kentucky rifles.
 

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If you're curious about the markings that you can't read, lightly rub chalk over the area. It should leave the markings dark so you can read them. For a better explanation you can Google grave rubbing. It's the same general thing.
 
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