FN-49 and stripper clips

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by Holiday, Jun 20, 2002.

  1. Holiday

    Holiday Guest

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    Greetings, folks! I just bought my first FN-49 and have a couple of questions. My rifle is an Egyptian contract model in 8mm Mauser. First, what type of stripper clips does this rifle use? I have tried some five round Turkish(I think) clips and while they work, they are far from perfect. Second, what years were these rifles made? My serial number is a four digit and starts with 82(82xx). My rifle has a crown-type crest on the reciever. Any help will be appreciated!:D
     
  2. Goose52

    Goose52 Guest

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    Holiday - Left you another answer over on FAL Files but in regards to the production date of your rifle I'll contibute the following.

    The trends in my data base, and a few secondary sources, lead me to believe that the Egyptian contract was the second production contract for the FN-49, following the Venezuelan contract. Production probably started on the Egyptians in late '49, perhaps early 1950. With an 8XXX number, my guess is that your rifle off the line by early to mid 1950. King Farouk was deposed in July 1952 and abdicated in favor of his son, but by 1953 the Egyptian monarchy was abolished and the monarchical “Crownâ€￾ crest would have been discontinued at this point (or perhaps later upon the completion of pre-existing weapons contracts). There are 35,900 Crown-crested Egyptians (that we know of so far) and production of these could have been completed by as early as 1951. Probably starting about midway through the Egyptian contract, the 2nd 4000 Vennies came off the line as well as the start of production for the 125,000 rifles in 30-06 and the 5500 in 7.65.

    This hypothesis is based, as I said above, on just a few references in print, but more on observation of design changes to the rifle itself. For instance, only the 1st 4000 Venezuelan contract rifles, and all of the Egyptians, had NO lock screw on the rear guard screw. Service in the field showed that the rear guard screw has a tendency to loosen after firing a number of rounds (this is variable depending on how good the bedding is). All other, probably subsequent, contract rifles incorporated a rear lock screw to prevent this condition. This feature, the transition of the firing pin safety stop design, and a few others constitute the "clues" to try to piece this together.

    HTH

    Goose
     

  3. Holiday

    Holiday Guest

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    Thanks, Goose! The info here and on the other post are welcome. I really appreciate it! Now, lets slide on over to the Fal-files and see whats up over there.....:target: