For true rifle accuracy....

Discussion in 'The Powder Keg' started by oneastrix, Oct 17, 2002.

  1. oneastrix

    oneastrix G&G Newbie

    Is single stage better than progressive? I have an RL550B, but my Dad swears by a Lee single stage for rifle.......
     
  2. jerry

    jerry Since 03-15- 2002 Forum Contributor

    26,665
    25,484
    USA
    I believe any advantage would be in the powder measure/throw. Different types, ball, stick etc. will throw differently in different scenerios. Hand weighed is allways almost dead nuts on. Give credit to Dillon where credit is due. They have excellent throwers. Good basics habbits are still important in both operations. Trimmed brass, clean brass, properl adjusted dies, consistent components etc. you get the idea.
     

  3. Once you get the progressive set up and measure each round in the process progressive can be accurate.

    You need to constantly measure powder charge.....case length...bullet seat etc. as you go along.

    Most recommend checking every fifth round...or there abouts.

    Personally, when I reloaded using and old RCBS Rockchucker (going back many, many moon ago) I reloaded small lots for hunting and home defense. Consequently, checked nearly every round.
     
  4. FEG

    FEG Guest

    517
    2
    I think that a single-stage is better, if only because it encourages you to weigh each charge by hand.

    I shoot a few calibers that are just not feasible on a progressive. I am not buying the Dillon plate, special dies, etc. for something like .303 or 7.62x54. I shoot maybe 100-150 .303 rounds a year. (I may be exaggerating, and it's less than 100 some years.) I shoot mostly Barnaul and mil surp in 7.62x54, and I load maybe 500 rounds a year, tops. (Again, that was the first year; I am on a pace for more like 300 this year.)

    I enjoy loading for these calibers, and it takes handloading to fully realize the potential of an M-44, IMHO. Also, a Lee Challenger and 2 die sets cost less than a shellplate, if I recall correctly.

    I only have a single stage, so I may be biased!
     
  5. jarcp

    jarcp Guest

    253
    2
    As far as accuracy goes, I'd have to agree that a single stage is better. I have a Lee progressive, that I use like a single stage when I'm not loading up plinkers.
     
  6. jerry

    jerry Since 03-15- 2002 Forum Contributor

    26,665
    25,484
    USA
    Good points above posts.
    When I sit to load 1000 45's for plinking I want them to go boom with a fair amount of quality and safety of course.

    Shooting mabe 100 rounds of .308 through a BDL every year. I like to get into every minute detail especially the powder measuring. Slinging several hundred rounds of .223 at a 55 gal drum? Mabe back to progressive. Also mentioned to conduct accuracy checks on the progressive, good idea. I do this with my shotgun loader. I guess it would be ideal to have the bst of both worlds. A nice single stage press is allways usefull no matter how you load.
     
  7. dave375hh

    dave375hh Guest

    586
    1
    Weighing every charge is important in small cases like the .22 hornet, or the .222, .223 size. But once the powder charge goes over 35 grains a good powder measure used carefully will give you accurate charges that effect you loads much less than many other factors. Bullet run-out and seating depth matter much more than a couple tenths of the powder charge in larger cases. Benchresters use custom made measures, but they throw their charges not weigh them.

    As to the original question, I've never found my Dillon wanting in the accuracy dept. But when I load the serious rifle stuff I use a Redding ultra mag single stage press and mostly Redding dies(some RCBS, and Hornady dies also). The only Lee stuff I use is their auto prime, their push-through bullet size dies, and three 6cav molds.
     
  8. Indy

    Indy G&G Newbie

    I have two RL550Bs and love them. They are very consistant. However,(here he goes) there is a lot to be said about individual loads on a single stage press. I have a RCBS jr. which was the first I bought. I use it to load for my NM M1A and Ruger No.1. The pistol ammo and the other rifle ammo is loaded on the Dillions. If I load for matches I use the RCBS. In comparing .223 loads between the presses, if I use non-extruded powder there isn't any difference. I have the Dillions set up to load large and small primers respectively. It's such a pain to change it the primers around. So for I have three powder measures to lessen the changes between calibers. My plan is to have a powder measure per die insert. As you can tell I am basically a lazy person who would rather be shooting than reloading.
    Indy
     
  9. jarcp

    jarcp Guest

    253
    2
    dave375hh, What do you mean that handloaders throw their charges rather than weigh them? Are you saying they load by volume rather than weight?
     
  10. dave375hh

    dave375hh Guest

    586
    1
    I was talking about Benchrest shooters. They weigh the charges to set up the measure then after that just throw the charges at that setting, untill they buy a different lot of powder. No, I'm not speaking of volumetric charging.
     
  11. oneastrix

    oneastrix G&G Newbie

    Good info guys....I haven't even broken the RL550B out of its packaging. My Dad sent it to me a while back and toild me to hang onto it until he could visit and teach me a thing or two about safety first. If Dad says it, i do it...always been that way.

    He was talking about teaching me on a Lee single stage so I would understand everythig that goes into the process first..
     
  12. Ayteeone

    Ayteeone Guest

    33
    0
    I've not noticed any difference between types of machines as far as accuracy goes. Some machines are easier to use, and there are questions of durability. What I've found is that the steps I take for loading my .308 ammo pretty much make a progessive a non-issue, as I check many more things than the progressive allows for. For the 30/30 the progressive is great, I treat them like handgun ammo.
     
  13. oneastrix

    oneastrix G&G Newbie

    Those are the two rounds that I want to re-load. isn't that a coincidence!
     
  14. Ayteeone

    Ayteeone Guest

    33
    0
    For the .308 I take time to do a lot of the little things like case mouths, necks, primer pockets, weighing charges, case length, etc. My last batch of 100 gave an SD of 9 fps, which for me justifies the effort. I have used Redding, Hornady, and Lee dies, and am happiest with the Lee, mostly for the consistency of the crimp. My 110FP and 10FCM both respond well to this level of detail.
    For 30/30 I simplify the process, limiting extra effort to safety checks such as case length. This doesn't get shot past 200yds other than for fun, and I like to shoot a bunch of it, so the extra time isn't worthwhile.
     
  15. Calvin

    Calvin G&G Evangelist

    I have had a Lee single-stage for over 15 years and have never had one problem from it. It's a GOOD press-not a great one. I also have the Rock Chucker and like it, too. I bit the bullet 3 years ago and got a Lee Pro-1000. I use it to reload my rifle plinking ammo, but I still prefer to use a single-stage for my handgun loads, as I duplicate my duty loads.
     
  16. After reading all the responses, it sounds like I did good. I ordered the Lee single stage "anniversary special". It comes with everything needed to start except the dies.
    Should be here next week. That should keep me busy in the winter months when its too cold to go shooting.
    Anybody have a preference to the brand of dies they use? I know the Lee dies are about $10-$20 cheaper than other brands. Is there enough of a difference to justify the higher costs? I plan on getting at least 4 different sets so the extra cost would add up quickly.
     
  17. oneastrix

    oneastrix G&G Newbie

    What do you like to reload Snakebite?
     
  18. I'm going to reload the 6.5x55 Swede, 8mm, 7.62x54 and I thought I'd also try the .45 Colt.