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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
To the point of looking at stripped uppers.
Not sure If I am realy going to need a forward assist on a gun that will be cleaned regularly.
What are the arguments for and against a forward assist???
 

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Don' really have a pro or con, but I kinda look at them as I do CCWing; better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.
I agree whole heartedly. I'll take mine WITH thank you.
 

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I use my forward assist often. not because my AR had a feeding problem but when ever I chamber a round quietly because I am walking into my hunt area, I hit the FA to make sure the bolt is closed. I also use it after checking to make sure a round is chambered. a slick side AR upper looks cool and I have thought about using one in a build but in the end I would rather have the FA if needed than not have it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I use my forward assist often. not because my AR had a feeding problem but when ever I chamber a round quietly because I am walking into my hunt area, I hit the FA to make sure the bolt is closed. I also use it after checking to make sure a round is chambered. a slick side AR upper looks cool and I have thought about using one in a build but in the end I would rather have the FA if needed than not have it.
I can see where a forward assist would come in handy hunting.Especially if I am doing what we call mooching (slowly, quietly sneaking through the woods,sometimes tracking) while hunting hogs. Or, if I decide to convert to the allowed 450 bm, for deer in Ohio. I could get to my blind then engage slowly using the forward assist to finish. This would be a lot quieter.
On the other hand would not be much use, If hunting ground hogs, long distance coyotes, and shooting targets only.
 

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Not for me! I have the mechanical aptitude of a rotten orange. I can barely field strip a few of my guns to thoroughly clean them. I ain't about to start trying to assemble one. One of my newer guns had a defective trigger. I emailed the company and said well, how can we fix this. The guy said well, we could send you all the parts and you could replace everything in the trigger assembly. I said I don't have to have an engineering degree to do this, do I? He said oh no, it's easy. Here's an address to a Youtube video that takes you through it step by step. Parts came I watched the video. It asked for tools I didn't have, warned multiple times you have to watch this step closely or the spring will go SPROING, and shoot halfway across the room. I shut it down, to all the parts down to my local gunsmith, and said you do it. 4 days later he called, said gun was ready, $75. Paid him took the gun home. Yesterday took the gun to the range, and all the trigger problems were gone. I would almost guarantee that if I had attempted it, I would have heard no bang when I pulled the trigger. My last upper purchase was a COMPLETE upper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I'm just one of those guys that has to do things the hard way.;)Been ordering my AR a piece at a time.
Have asembled my lower on the kitchen table. Using a Brownels exploded view, and Military M16 handbook. With a cheap armorers wrench.(THAT I HAD TO FILE TO FIT THE NUT), a hammer, cheap needle nose plyers, a match book cover, freezer tape and a standerd punch set.
And yes, had to go to hardware store and buy a nother roll pin, (bent the first one).:oops:I had 2 sproing incidents.One that required me and kid cleaning the kitchen-dining room for 2 hrs to find a detent.
Just don't have the sense to save up about the same amount of money, and buy it in one piece.;)
Just gotta know how everything works. See all the parts and such. Once, tried to take apart the cat, but dad caught me before I got too far.;);) :D:D:D
 

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Depends on how you are going to use the gun. Didn’t see this as a drawback on the original sporter series but if given a choice would have one.

You can always push the BCG forward manually with your thumb using the flat spot. This is harder than using the forward assist though.

Although I’d be careful if chambering a round through the F/A required a great deal more pressure than my thumb could provide in sliding the bolt forward. Something is wrong — could be fouling or gunk — or could be something more dangerous.
 

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I accidentally ordered an upper without the area for a forward assist. I got another one but unsure which way I am going to go. As far as putting in the detent and springs, on the lower, if possible put the front end of the lower in a large zip lock bag and put in the detent. If it doesn't catch, the bag will have it.
 

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I prefer mine without one.
if a round isn't going to chamber shoving it in harder has never solved the problem for me.
[it usually just makes things worse]
it's easier to jack out the offending round making sure it still has it's bullet in place.
 

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I go with the forward assist. Yeah, a clean gun with good ammo, would probably never need one. But if you need to get the shot off, and the gun had gotten a little dirty- or whatever - a whack on the FA should seat it. I compete in 3 gun matches and like the extra assurance. And if I were in a SHTF situation, I definitely want the FA. Plus the AR is designed to have it.
Just my 2 cents. YMMV
 

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Previous closed-bolt self-loading service rifles in the U.S. arsenal—M1 Garand, M1/M2 Carbine, M14—had reciprocating operating rods that allowed the shooter to exert forward force when necessary. Many other combat rifles—notably the AK—have such a capability. On the AR-15, the charging handle only engages the bolt carrier group in rearward movement; other than the forward assist, there is no good way to put manual forward pressure on the bolt. The way I see it, it doesn’t hurt to have it, and in certain situations, it can be very useful.
I put them in every AR that I put together, it adds a whopping $13 to the total cost.
 

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I prefer mine without one.
if a round isn't going to chamber shoving it in harder has never solved the problem for me.
[it usually just makes things worse]
it's easier to jack out the offending round making sure it still has it's bullet in place.
The forward assist is good at turning a stuck round into a very stuck round.

I have them on most of my lowers. I don't use them, but that's how receivers come now and they don't hurt anything. Flat side receivers look sharp though...
 

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I preffer a FA and dust cover.
That said the FA is probably not necessary.
If your going without one go ahead and get side charging upper. most of them have the charging handle fixed to the bolt so you can exert forward pressure on it that way if need be.

I personally think it'd be nice to have a side charging AR, however it kinda opens up the upper to allowing in debris. there is no good way to keep it sealed up like the rear charging handle design.

For a bench or target gun its a non issue, but if its going to be used in the field maybe its not a good idea.

as a side note; Personally I have always felt that is the one thing that I would change about the Stoner design is the charging handle/operation. its awkward, only engages rearward and idk, i just feel like there should be a more positive and intuitive charging operation.
 

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While I agree that more often than not the forward assist (if needed) is more likely to make things worse than fix a situation, if you have no other options it might just save your butt. All of my Uppers have them and they don't really impact function or add enough extra weight to matter, so really it's more a matter of preference and the fact that if you get an upper without one and you ever decide to sell it it's marketability generally won't be a good as an upper with one since 99% of the folks out there want all the bells and whistles and will have never had the discussion that we're having in here. Just my 2c's worth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
[QUOTE="EtherialOne, post: 2196134, member: you ever decide to sell it it's marketability generally won't be a good as an upper with one since 99% of the folks out there want all the bells and whistles and will have never had the discussion that we're having in here. Just my 2c's worth.[/QUOTE]

I get it, Not planing on selling it but you never know.Guess I should go with it, for the same reason I put a ambidextrious sling attachment on the gas tube. Probably won't ever need it, but no measurable difference in cost don't add that much weight and may change my mind one day. Besides might be nice to have when sneeking though the woods.
 

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IIRC the gun was not designed to have it. Field problems inspired its addition.
Yes, it was thought the original design might possibly need some assistance going into battery so the design was modified to include the forward assist. But it was still put on there by a design.

Whether a person wants their rifle to have an FA or not is purely a personal matter. I view it much like the slide release on a semi-auto handgun. My normal method of loading a round into the chamber is to pull back the slide and release it like a slingshot. Most of the time I don't need the slide release. But there are some times when it's nice to have it.

As for an AR, I can think on at least one advantage of not having the FA. Some rifles are built to be as light as possible. Skeletonized bolt carrier, lightweight buffer, titanium pins, lightened grip, pencil barrel, etc, etc. A slick slide upper would save a few more ounces.
 
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