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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This evening I was shredding up a roast that I had in the pressure cooker and when I poked my forks into the meat I felt something solid. As I pulled the meat apart I saw copper. When I pulled it out it was a picture perfect mushroomed 300gr .375 caliber bullet.

To back up a bit, last year I shot a wild Angus bull. He was roughly 1000-1200lbs and as lean as lean can get. Anyways I shot him from about 150yds on a quartering away shot and the bullet didn’t exit. I’m guessing now that the shot entered the lungs and smashed through the shoulder and ended up in my roast.
I shot him with my 375 Ruger African with a 300gr Sierra Game King at about 2700fps. Retained weight is 262.6gr ,87.5% retention and mushroomed out to .89”.
Sierra told me that these bullets were meant for the 378 Weatherby and to hard for the H&H or Ruger. I will have to disagree with that.





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I have raised Angus bulls, never heard of a wild one, as bulls go they are pussycats. Guess if they never saw humans they might get shy.

Game kings have always been a good bullet, that one sure worked well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have raised Angus bulls, never heard of a wild one, as bulls go they are pussycats. Guess if they never saw humans they might get shy.

Game kings have always been a good bullet, that one sure worked well.
There is a herd of feral cattle that has escaped many years ago. They are about as wild as they get.

I’ve taken more game with Sierra bullets than any other at this point. They have always worked for me


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There is a herd of feral cattle that has escaped many years ago. They are about as wild as they get.

I’ve taken more game with Sierra bullets than any other at this point. They have always worked for me


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I have helped herd lost cattle many times in my life including 3 nights ago when 7 Angus escaped from a farm a mile away and were having a great tome in town, running through nice yards. I have an atv and many years pushing them horseback and on atvs and of course by foot. The guys trying go push them with cars and trucks had zero control. These were steers, none over about 1000 pounds.. However, a couple of them tried to test me but jumping the atv at them kept them off of me. About a half hour later I pushed them back to where they came.

That said, once they get much over 1000 pounds, cow or bull, if they choose to be aggressive, they can hurt people and you cannot control them on highways. The safest way is often to shoot them. Not very popular in town, so that seldom happens. Problem is a black Angus on a highway at night is a risk to everyone. Your 375 would solve that problem. Guess you just take a flat bed truck and front end loader when you hunt them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have helped herd lost cattle many times in my life including 3 nights ago when 7 Angus escaped from a farm a mile away and were having a great tome in town, running through nice yards. I have an atv and many years pushing them horseback and on atvs and of course by foot. The guys trying go push them with cars and trucks had zero control. These were steers, none over about 1000 pounds.. However, a couple of them tried to test me but jumping the atv at them kept them off of me. About a half hour later I pushed them back to where they came.

That said, once they get much over 1000 pounds, cow or bull, if they choose to be aggressive, they can hurt people and you cannot control them on highways. The safest way is often to shoot them. Not very popular in town, so that seldom happens. Problem is a black Angus on a highway at night is a risk to everyone. Your 375 would solve that problem. Guess you just take a flat bed truck and front end loader when you hunt them?
When I was younger my father owned a meat processing plant. On Tuesdays and Thursdays we would slaughter. There were a few times that I remember where some Rancher would wrangle a steer or two that broke away from the herd and became wild. We had one break out of the stock pens and go on a rampage through town and by the time they caught up to him he was headed towards an Elementary school with children at play. He was put down and brought back by a Front loader. Another time there was a steer that got loose inside the plant and wreaked havoc on the kill floor injuring a few of the employees. He broke through the bollards bending the galvanized steel posts to get out of the Kill stall. After that larger ones were installed and filled with concrete.

When I hunted this Bull it was on foot but we were able to drive a truck within about 50yds of him where he fell. If I had my side by side there it would have been an easy drive right up to him and work on him. We cut him up and would carry out the quarters. The rear quarters were the challenge and took us both to lift them to where you could shoulder him, breaking your back in the process :p :p .
I used the 375 Ruger because I wanted something that generated some serious energy in the 5,000ftlb range and would stop him quickly. The friend I was with used a 45-70 to kill his a year prior. He said he had to take multiple shots to drop it and it kept moving further and further away from where they could get a vehicle to. He told me if I had something big to bring it so it wouldn't be a repeat of his pack out.

I'm not saying that the 45-70 isn't capable if killing a Bull or large animal so don't anyone think that's the case.
 

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The Bearded Butchers out of Creston, Ohio did a fairly detailed video on their YouTube channel a few months ago about the actual operations of the back of house at their shop. They've got one of those knocker deals to incapacitate cattle but they climb up by the platform so they're about 4 ft. above the animal and it let it have a round of .270 Winchester when they do bison.
 

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When I was younger my father owned a meat processing plant. On Tuesdays and Thursdays we would slaughter. There were a few times that I remember where some Rancher would wrangle a steer or two that broke away from the herd and became wild. We had one break out of the stock pens and go on a rampage through town and by the time they caught up to him he was headed towards an Elementary school with children at play. He was put down and brought back by a Front loader. Another time there was a steer that got loose inside the plant and wreaked havoc on the kill floor injuring a few of the employees. He broke through the bollards bending the galvanized steel posts to get out of the Kill stall. After that larger ones were installed and filled with concrete.

When I hunted this Bull it was on foot but we were able to drive a truck within about 50yds of him where he fell. If I had my side by side there it would have been an easy drive right up to him and work on him. We cut him up and would carry out the quarters. The rear quarters were the challenge and took us both to lift them to where you could shoulder him, breaking your back in the process :p :p .
I used the 375 Ruger because I wanted something that generated some serious energy in the 5,000ftlb range and would stop him quickly. The friend I was with used a 45-70 to kill his a year prior. He said he had to take multiple shots to drop it and it kept moving further and further away from where they could get a vehicle to. He told me if I had something big to bring it so it wouldn't be a repeat of his pack out.

I'm not saying that the 45-70 isn't capable if killing a Bull or large animal so don't anyone think that's the case.
I do not think most people have a clue how strong they are. I steer wrestled a bit as a young man. One rodeo, after my event I was asked to work the stalls for the bull riding event, at a rodeo in Abilene, Texas. After a ride, the two pickup men would push the bulls to one end of the area where they would exit and we would push them back to holding pens. Something went south and they had two bulls in the area at one time and a rider dumped on the ground. Two pickup men and one clown could not control two angry bulls after some poor cowboy just hit the ground hard. So I opened an end gate and yelled for them to bring the bulls my way, well one big Brahma, well over 1700 pounds came in and I waited for the other to close the gate. It did not work. The big guy turned around and started back out. So the runs to the holding pends were about 5 feet wide, heavy wood fences, with a post about every 4 feet. I took a 2 inch pipe about 8 feet long and ran it through the run, the bull hit it hard, there was about 3-4 feet of gap between the pipe and the next two posts. And I was on the wrong side. That 2 inch pipe caught me in the belly and threw me like a rag doll. Another cowboy was trying to help and opened the gate behind me, bad move, in the frantic move of angry bulls. Others in the holding area burst into the chutes and two were headed my way, about to trample me. Another cowboy interviened and shut that gate in the nick of time. I just laid there breathless and hurt. Pretty funny really. The cowboy in the arena came out fine, because both of the bulls were coming after me, one still in the area, the other one that hit the pipe. So, I learned a lot about handling bulls that night, at age 19. It is easy, you just stay out of their way and do not ever trust anyone else to know what to do. It was my mistake to try and block the bull as I did .

I have been on the ground with angry bull s several times since then. The few times I was afraid, I quickly got to a tree, just in case I needed to climb one, lol. I have also been in a remote area with an angry bison once. I climbed up a rock as big as a truck and stayed there until it left. My buddy was about 50yards away and took pictures as I scurried up that Boulder. He labeled that picture of me on top of that rock as 'the fastest man alive'..You had to be there.

I have always thought of myself as pretty brave, however, it only takes one to dispell that myth. I share your respect for the big bullshat have gone wild, just never seen one, yet..
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Bearded Butchers out of Creston, Ohio did a fairly detailed video on their YouTube channel a few months ago about the actual operations of the back of house at their shop. They've got one of those knocker deals to incapacitate cattle but they climb up by the platform so they're about 4 ft. above the animal and it let it have a round of .270 Winchester when they do bison.
We used a Bolt gun that took a blank to drive the bolt into the back of the animal's head/neck juncture. It would instantly incapacitate them by severing their spine from the brain.
For pigs we would use an old single shot bolt action 22 rifle and do the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I do not think most people have a clue how strong they are. I steer wrestled a bit as a young man. One rodeo, after my event I was asked to work the stalls for the bull riding event, at a rodeo in Abilene, Texas. After a ride, the two pickup men would push the bulls to one end of the area where they would exit and we would push them back to holding pens. Something went south and they had two bulls in the area at one time and a rider dumped on the ground. Two pickup men and one clown could not control two angry bulls after some poor cowboy just hit the ground hard. So I opened an end gate and yelled for them to bring the bulls my way, well one big Brahma, well over 1700 pounds came in and I waited for the other to close the gate. It did not work. The big guy turned around and started back out. So the runs to the holding pends were about 5 feet wide, heavy wood fences, with a post about every 4 feet. I took a 2 inch pipe about 8 feet long and ran it through the run, the bull hit it hard, there was about 3-4 feet of gap between the pipe and the next two posts. And I was on the wrong side. That 2 inch pipe caught me in the belly and threw me like a rag doll. Another cowboy was trying to help and opened the gate behind me, bad move, in the frantic move of angry bulls. Others in the holding area burst into the chutes and two were headed my way, about to trample me. Another cowboy interviened and shut that gate in the nick of time. I just laid there breathless and hurt. Pretty funny really. The cowboy in the arena came out fine, because both of the bulls were coming after me, one still in the area, the other one that hit the pipe. So, I learned a lot about handling bulls that night, at age 19. It is easy, you just stay out of their way and do not ever trust anyone else to know what to do. It was my mistake to try and block the bull as I did .

I have been on the ground with angry bull s several times since then. The few times I was afraid, I quickly got to a tree, just in case I needed to climb one, lol. I have also been in a remote area with an angry bison once. I climbed up a rock as big as a truck and stayed there until it left. My buddy was about 50yards away and took pictures as I scurried up that Boulder. He labeled that picture of me on top of that rock as 'the fastest man alive'..You had to be there.

I have always thought of myself as pretty brave, however, it only takes one to dispell that myth. I share your respect for the big bullshat have gone wild, just never seen one, yet..
My good friend's mother married a rancher who raised cattle. One weekend he and I were visiting and while we were there we witnessed two big bull's fighting to get out of their pens that they were in like it was tooth picks. Big timber posts snapping like nothing. They were trying to get to the cows that were in season. There was another instance where another bull was in a back pasture and got a smell of cows in season and he ended up tearing up a few barbed wire fences so he could get to the ladies. They had to put him down because he was so wrapped up in the wire and had one thing on his mind.
When a Bull is angry or looking for love it's best that you are not in close proximity of him trying to prevent him from his goal.
 

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one thing a cow ain't scared of is a man on foot.
we get some feral cows up in the hills from time to time and you just don't know when your gonna run across one.
i'd rather deal with a bear, you can generally run them off with a rock.
those cows and especially the bulls just stare at you until you feel sorta comforted nothing is gonna happen, then the big mistake happens,, turning your back on them.
the stare is them turning over what they wanna do about you being there, and they don't make up their mind till you've moved past.
 

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one thing a cow ain't scared of is a man on foot.
we get some feral cows up in the hills from time to time and you just don't know when your gonna run across one.
i'd rather deal with a bear, you can generally run them off with a rock.
those cows and especially the bulls just stare at you until you feel sorta comforted nothing is gonna happen, then the big mistake happens,, turning your back on them.
the stare is them turning over what they wanna do about you being there, and they don't make up their mind till you've moved past.
I have a Boone and Crocket mule deer on my wall thanks to cows. I was hunting in the national grasslands near Gillettte, Wyomng. It is open range with local cattle there by lease. About 50 cattle started following me. Throwing rocks at them did not help, they just keep following and bellowing for a feed sac. About a half mile from the ruck I could see a big buck standing about 150 yards off just watching me and my 50 cows try to sneak down a gully.. He left, but a 180 grain core lock broke his neck from behind before he got far. So I dressed him,, then went an got my truck and all the while these 50 cows were there. By the time it was over that 50 cows had probably doubled. Pretty frustrating, but their cover probably was what sealed the deal...
 

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chuckle..
the last elk i shot was almost the same deal.
except i was walking slowly through the trees when i 'woke up' a bunch of yearling steers laying about chewing their cud.
i started talking to them asking where the elk where [making a joke of the whole thing] when they moved off and started walking towards a small herd of elk i couldn't see.
i popped out of the trees right behind them on a grass/sagebrush slope and the cows walked single file right past the elk. the elk watched them go past like they had the green light i stopped and popped the lead cow from maybe 100yds. away.
she dropped and the rest of them just stood there not knowing what to do still looking at the cows still walking up the next ridge.
i walked right up to them on the same trail as the cows used, and they had no idea i was even there until i got about 20yds. away then they took notice right quick.
 

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I like hunting in areas with cattle. not only do they provide cover (like said above) but they keep the underbrush cleared making it much easier to walk and walk quietly. but they can be a pain sometimes like when they mob the feeders and eat all the corn before the hogs & deer come in. and I have been chased by bulls too many times. but down here there is usually plenty of trees & fences to climb. the cattle now days are all branded and fairly docile but years ago we still had some of the wild 'yellow hammers" and they were truly wild and mean. they were especially scary during archery only season. knowing you couldn't stop one by shooting it made it very necessary to use the wind to get around them.
 
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