Gun and Game Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, this is probably something of a random question.

I've always been a fan of Jim Corbett's books. I think he was a fascinating character. In Man Eaters of Kumaon he talks about a .275 Rigby that was given to him. On doing a little net research I found out this was what the Bitish called a type of Mauser that was retooled by Rigby.

As I looked for some that were still around, I noticed some pretty high prices on these guns.

Are there any relatively low priced .275 Rigbys still around? Is there another name for them in the Mauser line?

I'm working on getting my C&R and would love to look into one of these.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,562 Posts
HI shollis I can't help you with your question but I can WELCOME you to Gun and Game.
I would think these guns were custom built useing the Mauser boltaction.
If you want one surplus Mauser actions are available today and theres several barrel manufactures that can sell/make you a barrell. The same is true with finding a stock theres plenty of manufactures of rifle stocks and this might be the cheapest way to attain a rifle like you described.
Otherwise you could be out a small fortune buying the ginuine artical.
My 2 cents...A.H
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the welcome.
I'm actually traveling to Russellville/Dardanelle this evening to visit in-laws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,562 Posts
Wow you have a long drive to make ! I live in So. Arkansas, don't be surprised if you see snow, the weather man predicted flurrys in that area last night.
Be careful...A.H
 

·
Resident Sasquatch
Joined
·
9,496 Posts
A.H. is right, originals are rare and pricey, unless you happen to run across someone who doesn't know what they've got. A (slightly) cheaper approach would be to have one built on a good 98 action. This will be expensive as well if it's done right, but will be cheaper than an original.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, toolman. I guess that dream will go on the back burner for a while.
Getting a Nagant and scoping it is stressing my play budget as it is...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
Some references say the .275 Rigby is identical to the 7x57 Mauser. I don't know if that is precisely true, but the ballistics look the same. You could try to find a Mauser sporter in 7x57, or you could re-barrel something like an Interarms Mark X. They are fairly common and relatively inexpensive. I have built several rifles on Mark X actions. They came out nice. Genuine Mauser 98s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,239 Posts
I doubt it

Some guns like the one you mentioned get a great deal of collector interest. Note the caliber itself failed in the greater marketplace. It is what one one would call a "niche" collectable. A few guns and a few collectors keep the price high.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
.275 Rigby = 7x57mm Mauser

The cartridge is known by at least four names: Spanish Mauser, 7mm Mauser, 7x57 and in England as the .275 Rigby.
The 7mm Rifle Cartridge
--------------------------------
In Great Britain the 7x57 became so popular that the John Rigby Company adopted it as the .275 Rigby.
7x57 Mauser
--------------------------------
The 7x57mm Mauser cartridge, also known as the 7x57mm, 7 mm Mauser, 7 mm Spanish Mauser and .275 Rigby, was developed by Mauser as a military cartridge in 1893.
7x57mm Mauser - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
--------------------------------
In 1899 the Rigby .275 calibre (7x57mm) Mauser system and Rigby .350 calibre Express Rifles were introduced.
The History of John Rigby & Co.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top